Portal:Music of Canada

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The Music of Canada Portal
This is a sister portal of the Canada and Music portals

Introduction

Music of Canada (by province or territory)

The music of Canada has reflected the diverse influences that have shaped the country. Aboriginals, the French, and the British have all made unique contributions to the musical heritage of Canada. The music has subsequently been heavily influenced by American culture because of its proximity and migration between the two countries. Since French explorer Samuel de Champlain arrived in 1605 and established the first permanent Canadian settlements at Port Royal and Quebec City in 1608, the country has produced its own composers, musicians and ensembles.

The Canadian music industry has produced internationally renowned Canadian artists since the beginning of the 19th century. Canada has developed a music infrastructure, that includes church halls, chamber halls, conservatories, academies, performing arts centers, record companies, radio stations, television music video channels. Canada's music broadcasting is regulated by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC). The Canadian Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences administers Canada's music industry awards, the Juno Awards, which commenced in 1970.

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Drum Dance Festival, Gjoa Haven, Nunavut, 2004
Before European settlers came to what is now Canada, the region was occupied by a large number of Aboriginal peoples Each of the aboriginal communities had (and have) their own unique musical traditions. Chanting - singing is widely popular and most use a variety of musical instruments.

Being resourceful and creative they used the materials at hand to make their instruments for thousands of years before Europeans immigrated to the new world. They made gourds and animal horns into rattles, many rattles were elaborately carved and beautifully painted. In woodland areas, they made horns of birchbark and drumsticks of carved antlers and wood. Drums were generally made of carved wood and animal hides. These musical instruments provide the background for songs and led to aboriginal dances. The Inuit are well-known for Inuit throat singing or katajjaq, an unusual method of vocalizing found only in a few cultures worldwide. The Innu are among the First Nations of Canada. They have maintained a vibrant folk music culture, especially involving dance and percussion-based music. For many years after Europeans came to Canada, First Nations people were forbidden to practice their traditional ceremonies.

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OLP, at the Virgin Festival, 2009
Spiritual Machines is the fourth studio album by Canadian alternative rock band Our Lady Peace, released by Columbia Records in December 2000.

Although not initially intended, the project evolved into a conceptual interpretation of futurist and inventor Raymond Kurzweil's 1999 book The Age of Spiritual Machines. Short tracks of spoken dialog from Kurzweil himself are interspersed among the actual songs on the album. The Kurzweil K250 keyboard, one of his inventions, was utilized throughout the recording of the album.

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Jeff Healey (born Norman Jeffrey Healey, March 25, 1966 - March 2, 2008) was a blind jazz and blues-rock vocalist and guitarist who attained musical and personal popularity, particularly in the 1980s and 1990s. Healey began playing guitar when he was three, developing his unique style of playing the instrument flat on his lap. When he was 17, he formed the band Blue Direction, a four-piece band which primarily played bar-band cover tunes.

His band released the album See the Light in 1988, featuring the hit single "Angel Eyes" and the song "Hideaway", which was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance. While the band was recording See the Light, they were also filming (and recording for the soundtrack of) the Patrick Swayze film Road House.

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"The Ryans and the Pittmans" is a popular Newfoundland folk song. It tells of the romantic entanglements of a sailor named Bob Pittman, and his desire to sail home to finally marry his "sweet Biddy".

The most famous recent version of the song was recorded by Great Big Sea, who are best known for performing energetic rock interpretations of traditional Newfoundland folk songs including sea shanties, which draw from the island's 500-year-old Irish, English, and French heritage.

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Portia White (1911–1968) a Canadian female singer of African descent achieved international fame and success. As a Black Canadian, her popularity helped to open previously closed doors for talented black women who followed. She was declared "A person of national historic significance" by the Government of Canada.

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Canadian music WikiProject

  • The Canadian music WikiProject was created on March 18, 2007, with the purpose of assembling writers and editors interested in Canadian music.
  • The aim of this project is to standardize and improve articles related to the various genres of Canadian music, as well as to create missing articles.
  • To become a member of the Canadian music WikiProject (anyone may join), simply click on the list of members - edit page and add your username.
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