Portal:Missouri

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Missouri portal banner.jpg

The Missouri Portal

The Show-Me State

Flag map of Missouri

Missouri

Flag of Missouri.svg
Missouri in United States.svg

Missouri (/mɪˈzʊəri/ (About this soundlisten) or /mɪˈzʊərə/) is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern United States, bordered by Iowa, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. With a 2009 estimated population of 5,987,580, Missouri is the 18th most populous state in the nation and the fifth most populous in the Midwest. It comprises 114 counties and one independent city. Missouri's capital is Jefferson City. The four largest urban areas are St. Louis, Kansas City, Springfield, and Columbia. Missouri was originally acquired from France as part of the Louisiana Purchase and became defined as the Missouri Territory. Part of the Missouri Territory was admitted into the union as the 24th state on August 10, 1821.

Seal of Missouri.svg

Missouri mirrors the demographic, economic and political makeup of the nation with a mix of urban and rural culture. It has long been considered a political bellwether state. With the exceptions of 1956 and 2008, Missouri's results in U.S. presidential elections have accurately predicted the next President of the United States in every election since 1904. It has both Midwestern and Southern cultural influences, reflecting its history as a border state. It is also a transition between the Eastern and Western United States, as St. Louis is often called the "western-most Eastern city" and Kansas City the "eastern-most Western city." Missouri's geography is highly varied. The northern part of the state lies in dissected till plains while the southern part lies in the Ozark Mountains (a dissected plateau), with the Missouri River dividing the two. The confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers is located near St. Louis. Read more ...

Selected article

Tiger hotel.jpg

Columbia /kəˈlʌmbiə/ is the fifth-largest city in Missouri, and the largest city in Mid-Missouri. With an estimated population of 102,324 in 2009, it is the principal municipality of the Columbia Metropolitan Area, a region of 164,283 residents. The city serves as the county seat of Boone County and as the location of the University of Missouri. The college town is politically liberal and is known by the nicknames "The Athens of Missouri," "College Town USA," and "CoMO." Over half of Columbians possess a bachelor's degree and over a quarter hold graduate degrees, making it the thirteenth most highly educated municipality in the United States.

Located among small tributary valleys of the Missouri River, Columbia is roughly equidistant from St. Louis and Kansas City. Greater St. Louis is 70 miles (110 km) to the East, and the Kansas City Metropolitan Area is 100 miles (160 km) to the West. Today, Columbia has a highly diversified economy, and is often ranked high for its business atmosphere. Never a strong center of industry and manufacturing, the city's economic base relies on the education, medical, technology and insurance industries. Studies consistently rank Columbia as a top city in which to live for educational facilities, health care, technological savvy, economic growth, cultural opportunities and cost of living. The city has been ranked as high as the second-best place to live in the United States by Money Magazine's annual list and is regularly in the top 100. Residents of Columbia are usually described as "Columbians."

Selected image

The Gateway Arch and downtown St. Louis are recognizable symbols of Missouri.
Credit: Daniel Schwan

The Gateway Arch and downtown St. Louis are recognizable symbols of Missouri.

Missouri news

Wikinews Missouri portal
  • US government to investigate paramilitary policing
  • Wikinews interviews former Matilda's player Sarah Walsh about Australian women's soccer
  • Wikinews interviews American zoologists about pirate perches' chemical camouflage
  • Supreme Court of the United States contemplates same-sex marriage
  • United States re-elects Barack Obama
  • Singer Andy Williams dies at 84
  • Pressure mounts on US Senate candidate Todd Akin to withdraw after controversial rape comments
  • Albert Pujols ends his worst homerun drought
  • St. Louis storm uproots tent; one dead, several injured
  • Deadly tornadoes blast U.S. Midwest leaving 39 dead

Recognized content

Featured articles

Featured lists

Good articles

Featured pictures

Selected biography

Bloody-bill-anderson.jpg

William T. Anderson (1839 – October 26, 1864), better known as Bloody Bill, was a pro-Confederate guerrilla leader in the American Civil War. Anderson led a band that targeted Union loyalists and Federal soldiers in Missouri and Kansas; he became notorious for the number of people he killed and the brutality of his behavior.

Raised by a family of Southerners in Kansas, Anderson began supporting himself by stealing and reselling horses in 1862. After his father was killed by a Union-loyalist judge, Anderson fled Kansas for Missouri. There, he robbed travelers and killed several Union soldiers. In early 1863, Anderson joined Quantrill's Raiders, a pro-Confederate group of guerrillas that operated in Missouri. He proved to be skilled at guerrilla warfare, earning the trust of the group's leaders, William Quantrill and George M. Todd. Anderson's acts as a guerrilla resulted in the imprisonment of his sisters; after one of them died in Union custody, Anderson devoted himself to revenge. He distinguished himself by taking a leading role in the Lawrence Massacre, and later participated in the Battle of Baxter Springs.

In late 1863, while Quantrill's Raiders spent the winter in Texas, animosity developed between Anderson and Quantrill. Anderson, perhaps falsely, implicated Quantrill in a murder, leading to the latter's arrest by Confederate authorities. Anderson subsequently returned to Missouri as the leader of a group of raiders and became the most feared guerrilla in the state, killing and robbing dozens of Union soldiers and civilian sympathizers throughout central Missouri. Although Union supporters viewed him as incorrigibly evil, Confederate sympathizers in Missouri saw his actions as justified, possibly owing to their mistreatment by Union forces. In September 1864, he led his guerrillas on a raid of Centralia, Missouri. Unexpectedly, they were able to capture a passenger train, the first time Confederate guerrillas had done so in the war. His men killed two dozen Union soldiers who had been passengers on the train, and later that day, set an ambush in which guerrillas killed more than one hundred Union militiamen. The day's events became known as the Centralia Massacre; in terms of number of lives lost and brutality shown to captives, it was possibly the most decisive guerrilla victory in the war. A month later, Anderson was killed in a battle against Union militia, to the joy of Union loyalists in Missouri. Historians have been mixed in their appraisals of Anderson: some see him as a sadistic, psychopathic killer, but others argue that the conditions in which he found himself are at least partly to blame for his actions.

Did you know

A tall, brown brick smokestack displays the word "FALSTAFF" down its side and stands to the left of a street.

Subcategories

Select [+] to view subcategories

WikiProjects

Related portals

Things you can do

Missouri topics

State of Missouri

Jefferson City (capital)

Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Wikibooks
Books

Commons
Media

Wikinews 
News

Wikiquote 
Quotations

Wikisource 
Texts

Wikiversity
Learning resources

Wikivoyage 
Travel guides

Wiktionary 
Definitions

Wikidata 
Database

Purge page cache
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Portal:Missouri&oldid=875122955"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Missouri
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Portal:Missouri"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA