Portal:Milan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II - evening.jpg


Introduction

CoA Città di Milano.svg

Milan (/mɪˈlæn, -ˈlɑːn/; Italian: Milano [miˈlaːno] (About this sound listen); Lombard: Milan [miˈlãː] (Milanese variant)) is a city in northern Italy, capital of Lombardy, and the second-most populous city in Italy after Rome, with the city proper having a population of 1,380,873 while its province-level municipality has a population of 3,235,000. Its continuously built-up urban area (that stretches beyond the boundaries of the Metropolitan City of Milan) has a population estimated to be about 5,270,000 over 1,891 square kilometres (730 square miles), ranking 4th in the European Union. The wider Milan metropolitan area, known as Greater Milan, is a polycentric metropolitan region that extends over central Lombardy and eastern Piedmont and which counts an estimated total population of 7.5 million, making it by far the largest metropolitan area in Italy. Milan served as capital of the Western Roman Empire from 286 to 402 and the Duchy of Milan during the middle and early modern age.[citation needed]

Milan is considered a leading alpha global city, with strengths in the field of the art, commerce, design, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, services, research, and tourism. Its business district hosts Italy's Stock Exchange and the headquarters of national and international banks and companies. In terms of GDP, it has the third-largest economy among European cities after Paris and London, but the fastest in growth among the three, and is the wealthiest among European non-capital cities. Milan is considered part of the Blue Banana and one of the "Four Motors for Europe."

The city has long been named fashion capital of the world and the world's design capital, thanks to several international events and fairs, including Milan Fashion Week and the Milan Furniture Fair, which are currently among the world's biggest in terms of revenue, visitors and growth. It hosted the Universal Exposition in 1906 and 2015. The city hosts numerous cultural institutions, academies and universities, with 11% of the national total enrolled students. Milan is the destination of 8 million overseas visitors every year, attracted by its museums and art galleries that boast some of the most important collections in the world, including major works by Leonardo da Vinci. The city is served by a large number of luxury hotels and is the fifth-most starred in the world by Michelin Guide. The city is home to two of Europe's most successful football teams, A.C. Milan and F.C. Internazionale, and one of Italy's main basketball teams, Olimpia Milano.

Selected location article

The Orto Botanico di Cascina Rosa (about 22,000 m²) is a botanical garden maintained by the University of Milan, and located at the end of Via Carlo Valvassori Peroni, Milan, Italy. It is open daily.

The garden was established on disused farmland in 2002 for research and education. Its primary research facilities are three greenhouses that include a total of 10 separate compartments that support modern technology including cryopreservation, molecular testing, etc. Current research includes genetic improvement of rice, and exploration of useful genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. The garden's grounds contain many labeled plants, lawns, a lake, and about 1 km of walking paths. Read more...

Selected pictures

In the news

No recent news

Selected area article

Turro is a district ("quartiere") of Milan, Italy, part of the Zone 2 administrative division, located north-east of the city centre. Before being annexed to Milan in 1918, it was an autonomous comune. The name derives from tur, the Lombard word for "tower". The Milan Metro subway (Line 1) has a stop at Turro. Read more...

Selected environment article

Milan foggy panorama with Velasca Tower.jpg

Milan has a humid subtropical climate (Cfa), according to the Köppen climate classification, or a temperate oceanic climate (Do), according to the Trewartha climate classification. Milan's climate is similar to much of Northern Italy's inland plains, with hot, sultry summers and cold, foggy winters. However, the mean number of days with precipitation per year is one of the lowest in Europe. The Alps and Apennine Mountains form a natural barrier that protects the city from the major circulations coming from northern Europe and the sea.

During winter, daily average temperatures can fall below freezing (0 °C [32 °F]) and accumulations of snow can occur: the historic average of Milan's area is 25 centimetres (10 in) in the period between 1961 and 1990, with a record of 90 centimetres (35 in) in January 1985. In the suburbs the average can reach 36 centimetres (14 in). The city receives on average seven days of snow per year.


Climate data for Milan (Linate Airport, 1971–2000, Extremes 1946–present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 21.7
(71.1)
23.8
(74.8)
26.9
(80.4)
32.4
(90.3)
35.5
(95.9)
36.6
(97.9)
37.2
(99)
36.9
(98.4)
33.0
(91.4)
28.2
(82.8)
23.0
(73.4)
21.2
(70.2)
37.2
(99)
Average high °C (°F) 5.9
(42.6)
9.0
(48.2)
14.3
(57.7)
17.4
(63.3)
22.3
(72.1)
26.2
(79.2)
29.2
(84.6)
28.5
(83.3)
24.4
(75.9)
17.8
(64)
10.7
(51.3)
6.4
(43.5)
17.7
(63.9)
Daily mean °C (°F) 2.5
(36.5)
4.7
(40.5)
9.0
(48.2)
12.2
(54)
17.0
(62.6)
20.8
(69.4)
23.6
(74.5)
23.0
(73.4)
19.2
(66.6)
13.4
(56.1)
7.2
(45)
3.3
(37.9)
13.0
(55.4)
Average low °C (°F) −0.9
(30.4)
0.3
(32.5)
3.8
(38.8)
7.0
(44.6)
11.6
(52.9)
15.4
(59.7)
18.0
(64.4)
17.6
(63.7)
14.0
(57.2)
9.0
(48.2)
3.7
(38.7)
0.1
(32.2)
8.3
(46.9)
Record low °C (°F) −15.0
(5)
−15.6
(3.9)
−7.4
(18.7)
−2.5
(27.5)
−0.8
(30.6)
5.6
(42.1)
8.4
(47.1)
8.0
(46.4)
3.0
(37.4)
−2.3
(27.9)
−6.2
(20.8)
−13.6
(7.5)
−15.6
(3.9)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 58.7
(2.311)
49.2
(1.937)
65.0
(2.559)
75.5
(2.972)
95.5
(3.76)
66.7
(2.626)
66.8
(2.63)
88.8
(3.496)
93.1
(3.665)
122.4
(4.819)
76.7
(3.02)
61.7
(2.429)
920.1
(36.224)
Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm) 6.7 5.3 6.7 8.1 8.9 7.7 5.4 7.1 6.1 8.3 6.4 6.3 83.0
Average relative humidity (%) 86 78 71 75 72 71 71 72 74 81 85 86 77
Mean monthly sunshine hours 58.9 96.1 151.9 177.0 210.8 243.0 285.2 251.1 186.0 130.2 66.0 58.9 1,915.1
Source: Servizio Meteorologico[1][2][3]
Read more...

Selected arts article

La Scala Theatre Ballet School (Italian: Scuola di Ballo del Teatro alla Scala) is one of the leading classical ballet schools in the world and is the associate school of La Scala Theatre Ballet, an international ballet company based at La Scala in Milan, Italy. The school forms part of the theatre's Academy for Performing Arts. Read more...

Selected religion article

Milan Cathedral from Piazza del Duomo.jpg

Milan Cathedral (Italian: Duomo di Milano Italian pronunciation: [ˈdwɔːmo di miˈlaːno]; Lombard: Domm de Milan Lombard pronunciation: [ˈdɔm de miˈlãː]) is the cathedral church of Milan, Lombardy, Italy. Dedicated to St Mary of the Nativity (Santa Maria Nascente), it is the seat of the Archbishop of Milan, currently Archbishop Mario Delpini. The cathedral took nearly six centuries to complete. It is the largest church in Italy (the larger St. Peter's Basilica is in the State of Vatican City) and the third largest in the world. Read more...

Selected sports article

This is the history of Associazione Calcio Milan, commonly referred to as A.C. Milan or simply Milan (Italian pronunciation: [ˈmiːlan]), an Italian professional football club based in Milan, Lombardy. Read more...

Selected education article

The University of Milano-Bicocca (Italian: Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, UNIMIB) is a public university located in Milan, Italy, providing undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate education. Established in 1998, it was ranked by the Times Higher Education 2014 ranking of the best 100 Universities under 50 years old as number 21 worldwide and first in Italy. Read more...

Selected transportation article

An ornate and extensively detailed gray stone classical portico with four sets of twinned columns at the top of which the Italian and European Union flags hang limply; above is clear blue sky. In front is a more modern one-story pavilion with an elevator in front of it inside a circular wall. Some people can be seen walking around.

Milan Central or Milano Centrale is the main railway station of the city of Milan, Italy and is the largest train station in Europe by volume. The station is a terminus and located at the northern end of central Milan. It was officially inaugurated in 1931 to replace the old central station (built 1864), which was a transit station but with a limited number of tracks and space, so could not handle the increased traffic caused by the opening of the Simplon tunnel in 1906.

Milano Centrale has high speed connections to Turin in the west, Venice via Verona in the east and on the north-south mainline to Bologna, Rome, Naples and Salerno. The Simplon and Gotthard railway lines connect Milano Centrale to Bern and Geneva via Domodossola and Zürich via Chiasso in Switzerland. Read more...

Did you know?

Topics


Related portals

Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Wikibooks
Books

Commons
Media

Wikinews 
News

Wikiquote 
Quotations

Wikisource 
Texts

Wikiversity
Learning resources

Wikivoyage 
Travel guides

Wiktionary 
Definitions

Wikidata 
Database

Purge server cache

  1. ^ "Milano/Linate (MI)" (PDF). Servizio Meteorologico. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 14, 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Stazione 080 Milano-Linate: Medie Mensili Periodo 1961–90". Servizio Meteorologico. Archived from the original on June 14, 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Milano Linate: Record mensili dal 1946" (in Italian). Servizio Meteorologico dell'Aeronautica Militare. Retrieved December 11, 2014. 
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Portal:Milan&oldid=850508612"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Milan
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Portal:Milan"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA