Portal:Michigan

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The Michigan Portal

Location of Michigan within the United States

Michigan (About this sound/ˈmɪʃɨgən/ ) is a Midwestern state of the United States of America. It was named after Lake Michigan, whose name is a French adaptation of the Ojibwe term mishigami, meaning "large water" or "large lake". Michigan is the eighth most populous state in the United States. It has the longest freshwater shoreline in the world, bounded by four of the five Great Lakes, plus Lake Saint Clair. In 2005, Michigan ranked third for the number of registered recreational boats, behind California and Florida. Michigan has 12,000 inland lakes. A person is never more than six miles (9.7 km) from a natural water source, or more than 85 miles (137 km) from Great Lakes coastline.

The state is the only state to consist entirely of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula of Michigan, to which the name Michigan was originally applied, is sometimes dubbed "the mitten," owing to its shape. When asked where in Michigan one comes from, a resident of the Lower Peninsula may often point to the corresponding part of his or her hand. The Upper Peninsula (often referred to as The U.P.) is separated from the Lower Peninsula by the Straits of Mackinac, a five-mile-wide (8.0 km) channel that joins Lake Huron to Lake Michigan. The Upper Peninsula (whose residents are often called "Yoopers") is economically important for tourism and natural resources. The Upper and Lower Peninsulas are connected by the five-mile-wide (8.0 km) Mackinac Bridge, which is the third longest suspension bridge between anchorages in the world. The bridge has given rise to the nickname of "trolls" for residents of the Lower Peninsula, because they live "under" (south of) the bridge.

Selected article

Tiger's opening day, 2007
The Detroit Tigers are a Major League Baseball team based in Detroit. The Tigers are in the American League Central Division and are the 2006 American League Champions. Since 1992 the team, operating as Detroit Tigers, Inc., a subsidiary of Ilitch Holdings, Inc., has been owned by Mike Ilitch, founder of Little Caesars Pizza and owner of the NHL's Detroit Red Wings.

The Tigers defeated Oakland, 4 games to none in the 2006 American League Championship Series but lost to the St. Louis Cardinals, 4 games to 1 in the 2006 World Series. The Tigers' last won the World Series in 1984, beating the San Diego Padres 4 games to 1. Since 2000, the Tigers have played in Comerica Park which replaced the aging Tiger Stadium.

Selected biography

Henry Benjamin "Hank" Greenberg (January 1, 1911, New York, New York – September 4, 1986), nicknamed "Hammerin' Hank," was an American professional baseball player in the 1930s and 1940s. A first baseman primarily for the Detroit Tigers, Greenberg was one of the premier power hitters of his generation. He hit 58 home runs in 1938, equalling Jimmie Foxx's 1932 mark, as the most in one season by any player between 1927--when Babe Ruth set a record of 60--and 1961--when Roger Maris surpassed it. He was a five-time All-Star, was twice named the American League's Most Valuable Player, and was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1956. Greenberg was also one of the first Jewish superstars in American professional sports. He garnered national attention in 1934 when he refused to play baseball on Yom Kippur, the Jewish day of atonement, even though the Tigers were in the middle of a pennant race.

Selected picture

The Little Sable Point Light Station
Credit: Jjegers

The Little Sable Point Light is located south of Pentwater in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is in the southwest corner of Golden Township, just south of Silver Lake State Park.

Spotlight city

Commandants Quarters Dearborn.jpg

Dearborn is the eighth largest city in the State of Michigan with a population of 98,153. First settled in the late 18th century by French farmers in a series of ribbon farms along the River Rouge and the Sauk Trail, the community grew with the establishment of the Detroit Arsenal on the Chicago Road linking Detroit and Chicago. It later grew into a manufacturing hub for the automotive industry.

The city was the home of Henry Ford and is the world headquarters of the Ford Motor Company. It has a campus of the University of Michigan as well as Henry Ford Community College. Dearborn has The Henry Ford, America's largest indoor-outdoor museum complex and Metro Detroit's leading tourist attraction. Dearborn's large population of Arab Americans adds to the unique culture of the city.

Symbols

Animate insignia
Bird American Robin (Turdus migratorius)
Fish Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)
Flower Apple blossom (Malus domestica)
Game animal White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)
Mammal Wolverine (Gulo gulo luscus) (unofficial)
Reptile Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta)
Tree Eastern White Pine (Pinus strobus)
Wildflower Dwarf Lake Iris (Iris lacustris)

Inanimate insignia
Fossil Mastodon (Mammut americanum)
Gemstone Isle Royale greenstone or Chlorastrolite
Motto "Si quaeris peninsulam amoenam circumspice"
Latin for "If you seek a pleasant peninsula, look about you"
Nicknames
Soil Kalkaska Sand
Songs My Michigan
Stone Petoskey stone

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The skyline of Detroit, Michigan

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