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Portal:Louisville

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Introduction

Louisville montage.jpg

Louisville (/ˈləvəl/ (About this sound listen) LOO-ə-vəl, /ˈlivɪl/ (About this sound listen) LOO-ee-vil, /ˈlʊvəl/ (About this sound listen) LUUV-əl) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the 29th most-populous city in the United States. It is one of two cities in Kentucky designated as first-class, the other being Lexington, the state's second-largest city. Louisville is the historical seat and, since 2003, the nominal seat of Jefferson County.

Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark, making it one of the oldest cities west of the Appalachian Mountains. It is named after King Louis XVI of France. Sited beside the Falls of the Ohio, the only major obstruction to river traffic between the upper Ohio River and the Gulf of Mexico, the settlement first grew as a portage site. It was the founding city of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, which grew into a 6,000-mile (9,700 km) system across 13 states. Today, the city is known as the home of legendary boxer Muhammad Ali, the Kentucky Derby, Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC), the University of Louisville and its Louisville Cardinals athletic teams, Louisville Slugger baseball bats, and three of Kentucky's six Fortune 500 companies. Its main airport is also the site of United Parcel Service's worldwide air hub.

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KFC, or Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a fast food restaurant chain based in Louisville, Kentucky. Founded by Colonel Harland Sanders, KFC is now a division of Yum! Brands. KFC is known mainly for its fried chicken.

The company adopted the abbreviated form of its name in 1991. Three reasons are commonly speculated: de-emphasis of chicken, as the chain was moving to offer other foods; the unhealthy connotations of "fried"; or a shorter name that would be considered more appealing to younger customers. Recently, the company has begun to re-embrace the Kentucky Fried Chicken name, and now uses both Kentucky Fried Chicken and KFC in advertisements. The Kentucky Fried Chicken name can be seen on some buckets of chicken. As of 2007, the company's website uses Kentucky Fried Chicken for the logo in the United States.

The popularity and novelty of KFC has led to the general formula of the fried chicken fast-food restaurant being copied by restaurant owners worldwide.

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Lou Confed South.jpg
Photo credit: C. Bedford Crenshaw
Louisville Confederate Monument is 70 feet tall and made from granite, with bronze statues.

Did you know...

Southern Indiana

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Jefferson General Hospital was the third-largest hospital during the American Civil War, located at Port Fulton, Indiana (now part of Jeffersonville, Indiana) and was active between February 21, 1864 and December 1866. The land was owned by U.S Senator from Indiana Jesse D. Bright. Bright was sympathetic to the Confederates, and was expelled from his position as Senator in 1862. Union authorities took the property without compensation, similar to what happened at Arlington National Cemetery.

Eventually, a man named James Holt came into ownership of the property. At his death he bequeathed the property to his Masonic Lodge, Clark Lodge #40 as a Masonic orphans home around 1915.

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On this day in Louisville history...

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Papa John's Cardinal Stadium is a football stadium located in Louisville, Kentucky, USA and serves as the home of the University of Louisville football program. It opened in 1998, making it the next-to-last football stadium in NCAA Division I-A (now Division I FBS) to open in the 20th century, with SMU's Gerald J. Ford Stadium being the last. The official seating capacity in the horseshoe-shaped facility is 42,000.

A unique aspect of the facility is that there are no bleachers — every seat is a chairback seat. This particular feature is fairly common in European soccer stadiums and the NFL, but is very rare in college football.

Selected biography

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Sue Grafton (born April 24, 1940 in Louisville, Kentucky, USA) is a contemporary American author of detective novels. Grafton began writing when she was 18 and finished her first novel four years later. She continued writing, and completed six more manuscripts. Two of these seven novels were published. While reading Edward Gorey's The Gashlycrumb Tinies, which is an alphabetical picture book of children who die by various means, she had the idea to write a series of novels based on the alphabet. She immediately sat down and made a list of all of the crime-related words that she knew.

This exercise led to her best known works, a chronological series of mystery novels. Known as "the alphabet novels," the stories are set in and around the fictional town of Santa Teresa, which is based on the author's primary city of residence, Santa Barbara, California.

Quotes

  • "It all keeps me busy, I love Louisville. I'll always be in Louisville."Paul Hornung
  • "It's important to support this because of what happened right here. It's like living in Louisville and someone never having been to the Derby. I don't think a lot of people realize what goes on here."Mark Wells
  • "As the state's biggest city, Louisville sets the precedent." – Mike Kuntz

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