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Portal:Louisville

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Introduction

Louisville montage.jpg

Louisville (/ˈləvəl/ (About this sound listen) LOO-ə-vəl, /ˈlivɪl/ (About this sound listen) LOO-ee-vil, /ˈlʊvəl/ (About this sound listen) LUUV-əl) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the 29th most-populous city in the United States. It is one of two cities in Kentucky designated as first-class, the other being Lexington, the state's second-largest city. Louisville is the historical seat and, since 2003, the nominal seat of Jefferson County.

Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark, making it one of the oldest cities west of the Appalachian Mountains. It is named after King Louis XVI of France. Sited beside the Falls of the Ohio, the only major obstruction to river traffic between the upper Ohio River and the Gulf of Mexico, the settlement first grew as a portage site. It was the founding city of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad, which grew into a 6,000-mile (9,700 km) system across 13 states. Today, the city is known as the home of the Kentucky Derby, Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC), the University of Louisville and its Louisville Cardinals athletic teams, Louisville Slugger baseball bats, and three of Kentucky's six Fortune 500 companies. Its main airport is also the site of United Parcel Service's worldwide air hub.

Selected article

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Cave Hill Cemetery is a 296-acre Victorian era National Cemetery and arboretum located at 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky. It is open daily to the public from 8:00 AM to 4:45 PM (weather permitting). Its main entrance is on Baxter Avenue and there is a secondary one on Grinstead Drive. Both former Louisville mayors, for whom these streets are named (James F. Grinstead and John G Baxter), are buried in Cave Hill Cemetery.

Cave Hill was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Cave Hill National Cemetery, containing military graves, is also on the National Register, added in 1998. Within the National Cemetery two additional items on the National Register: the 32nd Indiana Monument and the Louisville Union Monument.

Over 200 Confederate soldiers are buried in Section O. The original wooden grave markers have since been replaced by stone ones.

There were about 120,000 people interred by 2002, with space remaining for 22,000 more graves.

Selected image

Lou Confed South.jpg
Photo credit: C. Bedford Crenshaw
Louisville Confederate Monument is 70 feet tall and made from granite, with bronze statues.

Did you know...

The Limerick area of Louisville

Southern Indiana

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Culbertson Mansion State Historic Site is located in New Albany, Indiana by the Ohio River. It was the home of William Culbertson, who was once the richest man in Indiana. Built in 1867 at a cost of $120,000, this French Second Empire-style mansion has 25-rooms within 20,000 square feet, and was completed in November of 1869. It was designed by James T. Banes, a local architect. Features within the three-story edifice include hand-painted ceilings and walls, frescoed ceilings, carved rosewood cantilevered staircase, marble fireplaces, wallpaper of fabric-quality, and crystal chandeliers. The tin roof was imported from Scotland. The displays within the mansion feature the Culbertson family and the restoration of the building. The rooms on the tour are the formal parlors, dining rooms, bedrooms, kitchen, and laundry room.

The Culbertson Mansion performs historic restoration rather than renovation to protect the historical integrity of the home. The eventual goal is to return the mansion to its 1869 appearance, barring necessary modern items as electricity and bathrooms.

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On this day in Louisville history...

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Papa John's Cardinal Stadium is a football stadium located in Louisville, Kentucky, USA and serves as the home of the University of Louisville football program. It opened in 1998, making it the next-to-last football stadium in NCAA Division I-A (now Division I FBS) to open in the 20th century, with SMU's Gerald J. Ford Stadium being the last. The official seating capacity in the horseshoe-shaped facility is 42,000.

A unique aspect of the facility is that there are no bleachers — every seat is a chairback seat. This particular feature is fairly common in European soccer stadiums and the NFL, but is very rare in college football.

Selected biography

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Muhammad Ali (born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Jr. on January 17, 1942) is a retired American boxer and former three-time World Heavyweight Champion and winner of an Olympic gold medal. In 1999, Ali was crowned "Sportsman of the Century" by Sports Illustrated and the BBC.

Ali was born in Louisville, Kentucky. He was named after his father, Cassius Marcellus Clay, Sr., who was named for the 19th century abolitionist and politician Cassius Clay. Ali changed his name after joining the Nation of Islam and subsequently converted to Sunni Islam in 1975.

He barely graduated from Louisville Central High, a local basketball power, finishing 369th out of 391 graduating seniors in the class of 1960, and often traveling to fight on weekends. A principal named Atwood argued in his favor, stating to his colleagues that the boy should be given a Certificate of Attendance, given that "...one day he'll be making more money than everyone in this room."

Quotes

  • "It all keeps me busy, I love Louisville. I'll always be in Louisville."Paul Hornung
  • "It's important to support this because of what happened right here. It's like living in Louisville and someone never having been to the Derby. I don't think a lot of people realize what goes on here."Mark Wells
  • "As the state's biggest city, Louisville sets the precedent." – Mike Kuntz

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