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Portal:Louisville

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Louis XVI statue JCC.jpg

Louisville (/ˈlvɪl/ (About this sound listen), locally /ˈl.əvəl/ (About this sound listen) or /ˈlʌvəl/ (About this sound listen)) is the largest city in the U.S. state of Kentucky, and the county seat of Jefferson County. Since 2003, the city's borders have been coterminous with those of the county because of a city-county merger. The city's population at the 2010 census was 741,096. An important internal shipping port in the 19th century, Louisville today is best known as the location of the Kentucky Derby, the first of three annual thoroughbred horse races making up the Triple Crown.

Louisville is situated on the Ohio River in north-central Kentucky at the Falls of the Ohio. Because it includes counties in Southern Indiana, the Louisville metropolitan area is often referred to as Kentuckiana. The river forms the border between Kentucky and Indiana. A resident of Louisville is referred to as a Louisvillian. Although situated in a Southern state, Louisville is influenced by both Southern and Midwestern culture. It is sometimes referred to as either the northernmost Southern city or the southernmost Northern city in the United States.

The settlement that became the city of Louisville was founded in 1778 by George Rogers Clark and is named after King Louis XVI of France.

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The Big Four Bridge is an abandoned six-span railroad truss bridge that crosses the Ohio River, connecting Louisville, Kentucky and Jeffersonville, Indiana. It was completed in 1895, and updated in 1929. It has its largest span at 547 feet (167 m), for 2,545 feet in total. It gets its name from the defunct Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railway, which was nicknamed the "Big Four Railroad". Current plans for the Big Four Bridge include making it a pedestrian walkway, making it only the second one in the Louisville area for pedestrians to cross the Ohio River (the George Rogers Clark Memorial Bridge is currently the only one crossing the Ohio River between Louisville and its Indiana suburbs of New Albany, Clarksville, and Jeffersonville). Access to the Big Four Bridge is currently limited, as the access ways onto the bridge for the general public were removed in 1969, earning the Big Four Bridge the nickname "Bridge That Goes Nowhere".

The Big Four Bridge had one of the biggest bridge disasters in the United States, occurring on December 15, 1893 when a construction crane was dislodged by a severe wind. This caused the falsework support of a truss to be damaged, and the truss – with forty-one workers on it – fell into the Ohio River. Twenty of the workers survived, but twenty-one died. The accident almost cost more lives, as a ferry crossing the Ohio River just barely missed being hit by the truss. Hours later, a span next to the damaged span also fell into the river, but was abandoned at the time, causing no injuries as a result.

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Photo credit: C. Bedford Crenshaw
Louisville Confederate Monument is 70 feet tall and made from granite, with bronze statues.

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Big Four Bridge

Southern Indiana

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Charlestown State Park is an Indiana state park on 2,400 acres (9.71 km2) in Clark County, Indiana, in the United States. The park is on the banks of the Ohio River, 1 mile (1.6 km) east of Charlestown. It was once part of the Indiana Army Ammunition Plant (INAAP), and was donated in separate parcels to the Indiana state government. In 1993, the state of Indiana was given 859 acres (3.48 km2) , and in 1994 was given an additional 1,125 acres (4.55 km2) . When the park opened in 1996, it encompassed 2,400 acres (9.71 km2). With an additional 2,600 acres (10.52 km2) given by the INAAP in 2004, the park has 5,100 acres (20.64 km2), making it the third largest state park in Indiana.

There are still railroad tracks and private houses on the property, and the Indiana state government is still deciding what to do with them. Future developments confirmed by the state for the park include a swimming pool, access to Rose Island via a pedestrian bridge, more trails, improvements to the campground, cabins, and maybe even a state park inn.

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On this day in Louisville history...

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Farmington is an 18-acre historic site in Louisville, Kentucky, was once the center of a hemp plantation owned by John and Lucy Speed. The 14-room, Federal-style brick home possibly based on a design by Thomas Jefferson and has several Jeffersonian architectural features.

The Farmington site was part of a military land grant given to Captain James Speed in 1780. His son, John Speed, completed Farmington on a tract of land in 1816. Built in the Federal architectural style, the house is based on plans by Thomas Jefferson, which are now in the Coolidge Library of Massachusetts Historical Society.

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Don Rosa (born June 29, 1951) is a comic book writer and illustrator best known for his stories about Scrooge McDuck, Donald Duck and other Disney characters. He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. His most famous work is The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck.

Rosa took a chance at more professional cartooning with his creation of the comic strip character Captain Kentucky for the Saturday edition of the local newspaper Louisville Times. Captain Kentucky was the superhero alter ego of Lancelot Pertwillaby. Publication started on October 6, 1979. The comic strip ended on August 15, 1982 after the publication of 150 episodes. After three years with Captain Kentucky, Don decided that it was not worth the effort. He retired from cartooning and did not draw a single line for the next four years. Years later, as his fame grew, his non-Disney work was published by the Norwegian publisher Gazette Bok in 2001, in the two hard-cover books The Pertwillaby Papers and The Adventures of Captain Kentucky

Don remains popular with readers across Europe but considers himself rather obscure in his native United States, an irony worthy of a satirical artist.

Quotes

  • "It all keeps me busy, I love Louisville. I'll always be in Louisville."Paul Hornung
  • "It's important to support this because of what happened right here. It's like living in Louisville and someone never having been to the Derby. I don't think a lot of people realize what goes on here."Mark Wells
  • "As the state's biggest city, Louisville sets the precedent." – Mike Kuntz

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