Portal:Jacksonville

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Introduction

Flag of Jacksonville


Jacksonville is the most populous city proper in the U.S. state of Florida, and eleventh most populous in the United States. Originally called Wacca Pilatka by the Seminole and Cowford by the British, the city takes its present name from Andrew Jackson, the first military governor of the Florida Territory and seventh President of the United States.

In 1968, Jacksonville consolidated with Duval County, creating the largest city by area in the contiguous United States. Most of its metropolitan population is within the city limits; with an estimated population of 827,908. The entire metropolitan area had a population of 1,345,596 in 2010. Residents of Jacksonville are referred to as "Jacksonvillians" or "Jaxsons".

The city is in Northeast Florida, centered on the banks of the St. Johns River, about 25 miles (40 km) south of the Georgia state line and about 340 miles (547 km) north of Miami. It is a major military and civilian deep-water port, housing two U.S. Navy bases and the Port of Jacksonville, Florida's third largest seaport. Significant sectors of the local economy include services such as banking, insurance, healthcare, logistics, and tourism

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Featured article

First edition cover of Palmetto Leaves
Palmetto Leaves is a memoir and travel guide written by Harriet Beecher Stowe about her winters in the town of Mandarin, Florida, published in 1873. Already famous for having written Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852), Stowe came to Florida after the U.S. Civil War (1861–1865). She purchased a plantation near Jacksonville as a place for her son to recover from the injuries he had received as a Union soldier and to make a new start in life. After visiting him, she became so enamored with the region she purchased a cottage and orange grove for herself and wintered there until 1884, even though the plantation failed within its first year. Parts of Palmetto Leaves appeared in a newspaper published by Stowe's brother, as a series of letters and essays about life in northeast Florida.

Scion of New England clergy, Stowe keenly felt a sense of Christian responsibility that was expressed in her letters. She considered it her duty to help improve the lives of newly emancipated blacks and detailed her efforts to establish a school and church in Mandarin toward these ends. Parts of the book relate the lives of local African-Americans and the customs of their society. Stowe described the charm of the region and its generally moderate climate but warned readers of "excessive" heat in the summer months and occasional cold snaps in winter. Her audience comprises relatives, friends, and strangers in New England who ask her advice about whether or not to move to Florida, which at the time was still mostly wilderness. Although it is a minor work in Stowe's oeuvre, Palmetto Leaves was one of the first travel guides written about Florida and stimulated Florida's first boom of tourism and residential development in the 1880s.

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Featured picture

US Navy 090425-N-2821G-147 Landing craft, air cushioned (LCAC) assigned to Assault Craft Unit 4 from the amphibious transport dock ship USS Mesa Verde (LPD 19) come ashore near Mayport.jpg
Photo credit: United States Navy

Mayport (April 25, 2009)

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Selected quotation

Claude Yates, 'Yates Manifesto' (1965)
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Featured biography

A. Philip Randolph (1963)
A. Philip Randolph (April 15, 1889 – May 16, 1979) was a leader in the Civil Rights Movement, the American labor movement and socialist political parties.

He organized and led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first predominantly Black labor union. In the early civil-rights movement, Randolph led the March on Washington Movement, which convinced President Franklin D. Roosevelt to issue Executive Order 8802 in 1941, banning discrimination in the defense industries during World War II. After the war Randolph pressured President Harry S. Truman to issue Executive Order 9981 in 1948, ending segregation in the armed services.

In 1963, Randolph was the head of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, which was organized by Bayard Rustin, at which Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his "I Have A Dream" speech. Randolph inspired the Freedom budget, sometimes called the "Randolph Freedom budget", which aimed to deal with the economic problems facing the Black community, particularly workers and the unemployed.

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In the news

Jacksonville items from Wikinews
  • April 14: Zimmerman stands before judge for the Trayvon Martin shooting
  • November 25: Wikinews interviews Darcy Richardson, Democratic Party presidential challenger to Barack Obama
  • September 20: Leonard Skinner, namesake of rock group Lynyrd Skynyrd, dies at age 77
  • April 14: Physicist John Wheeler dies at age 96
  • January 13: New England Patriots go 17-0
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