Portal:Health and fitness

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The health and fitness portal

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The most widely accepted definition of health is that of the World Health Organization Constitution. It states: "health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity" (World Health Organization, 1946). In more recent years, this statement has been amplified to include the ability to lead a "socially and economically productive life". The WHO definition is not without criticism, mainly that it is too broad. Some argue that health cannot be defined as a state at all, but must be seen as a dynamic process of continuous adjustment to the changing demands of living. In spite of its limitations, the concept of health as defined by WHO is broad and positive in its implications, in that it sets out a high standard for positive health.

The most solid aspects of wellness that fit firmly in the realm of medicine are the environmental health, nutrition, disease prevention, and public health matters that can be investigated and assist in measuring well-being. Please see our medical disclaimer for cautions about Wikipedia's limitations.

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Selected biography

Pauling.jpg

Linus Carl Pauling (February 28, 1901 – August 19, 1994) was an American quantum chemist and biochemist, widely regarded as the premier chemist of the twentieth century. Pauling was a pioneer in the application of quantum mechanics to chemistry, and in 1954 was awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry for his work describing the nature of chemical bonds. He also made important contributions to crystal and protein structure determination, and was one of the founders of molecular biology. Pauling received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1962 for his campaign against above-ground nuclear testing, becoming only one of four people in history to individually receive two Nobel Prizes. Later in life, he became an advocate for regular consumption of massive doses of Vitamin C. Pauling coined the term "orthomolecular" to refer to the practice of varying the concentration of substances normally present in the body to prevent and treat disease, and promote health.

Pauling was first introduced to the concept of high-dose vitamin C by biochemist Irwin Stone in 1966 and began taking several grams every day to prevent colds. Excited by the results, he researched the clinical literature and published "Vitamin C and the Common Cold" in 1970. He began a long clinical collaboration with the British cancer surgeon, Ewan Cameron, MD [1] in 1971 on the use of intravenous and oral vitamin C as cancer therapy for terminal patients. Cameron and Pauling wrote many technical papers and a popular book, "Cancer and Vitamin C", that discussed their observations. He later collaborated with the Canadian physician, Abram Hoffer, MD, PhD,[2] on a micronutrient regimen, including high-dose vitamin C, as adjunctive cancer therapy.

The selective toxicity of vitamin C for cancer cells has been demonstrated repeatedly in cell culture studies. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences [3] recently published a paper demonstrating vitamin C killing cancer cells. As of 2005, some physicians have called for a more careful reassessment of vitamin C, especially intravenous vitamin C, in cancer treatment.

With two colleagues, Pauling founded the Institute of Orthomolecular Medicine in Menlo Park, California, in 1973, which was soon renamed the Linus Pauling Institute of Science and Medicine. Pauling directed research on vitamin C, but also continued his theoretical work in chemistry and physics until his death in 1994. In his last years, he became especially interested in the possible role of vitamin C in preventing atherosclerosis and published three case reports on the use of lysine and vitamin C to relieve angina pectoris. In 1996, the Linus Pauling Institute moved from Palo Alto, California, to Corvallis, Oregon, to become part of Oregon State University, where it continues to conduct research on micronutrients, phytochemicals (chemicals from plants), and other constituents of the diet in preventing and treating disease.

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Reference links

  • Health category on dmoz. Contains sub-categories about nutrition, fitness, …
  • World Health Organization
  • USA Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  • UK National Health Service News
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Health and fitness news

Wikinews health portal
  • July 27: Publisher withdraws book about Nelson Mandela's final days after family complaint
  • April 28: Shrink-wrapped sheep survive: Researchers say 'Biobag' artificial uterus, successful on lambs, may one day be suitable for use on premature human babies
  • April 16: Canada to legalise marijuana to 'make it more difficult for kids to access'
  • March 27: Numerous home pregnancy tests recalled after false negative results reported

Ongoing health news

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Quotes

“Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.”

Mark Twain

"The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in battle."

- Navy SEALs

"He who has health has hope, and he who has hope has everything." [Arabian Proverb]

“Human life needs superhuman health.”

- Leonid S. Sukhorukov

"An apple a day keeps the doctor away."

"Do not spend health to gain money, and then, do not spend money to regain health"

" Honour your Divine Body Temple"

- Fitness Guru Derek Duke Noble

"To sit in a comfortable position or posture for everlasting period is called asana"

- BirenDra ShaH

Health is very important for our life [kailash vishwakarma]


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  • Improve the see also reference sections in health articles
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Topics   (all)

General  – Health care • Health care industry • Health disparities • Mental health • Population health • Preventive medicine • Public health • Complementary and alternative medicine

Self-care – Body composition • Life extension • Longevity • Physical fitness

Nutrition – Calorie restriction • Dietary supplements (Amino acids, Minerals, Nootropics, Nutrients, Vitamins) • Diet (nutrition) • Dieting • Healthy eating pyramid.
Physical exercise – Stretching • Overtraining • Aerobic exercise • Anaerobic exercise • Sport • Walking
Hygiene – Cleanliness • Oral hygiene • Occupational hygiene

Health science – Dentistry • Occupational therapy • Optometry • Pharmacy • Physiotherapy • Speech-Language Pathology

Medicine – Midwifery • Nursing • Veterinary medicineDentistry • Holistic Medicine
Human medicine – Cardiology • Dermatology • Emergency medicine • Endocrinology and Diabetology • Epidemiology • Geriatrics • Hematology • Internal medicine • Nephrology • Neurology • Oncology • Pathology • Pediatrics • Psychiatry • Rheumatology • Surgery • Urology
Illness  – Aging • Alcoholism • Atrophy • Deficiency disease • Depression • Disease • Disorders (types) • Drug abuse • Eating disorder • Foodborne illness • Malnutrition • Obesity • Smoking
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Lists of basic topics   (all)

See also: Biology (below)

Health – Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being. this is a level of functional and (or) metabolic efficiency of a person in mind, body and spirit; being free from illness, injury or pain (as in “good health” or “healthy”). The World Health Organization (WHO) defined health in its broader sense in 1946 as "a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity."

  • Death – cessation of life.
  • Exercise – any bodily activity that enhances or maintains physical fitness and overall health and wellness. It is performed for various reasons including strengthening muscles and the cardiovascular system, honing athletic skills, weight loss or maintenance, and mental health including the prevention of depression. Frequent and regular physical exercise boosts the immune system, and helps prevent the "diseases of affluence" such as heart disease, cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity.
  • Nutrition – provision, to cells and organisms, of the materials necessary (in the form of food) to support life.
  • Life extension – The study of slowing down or reversing the processes of aging to extend both the maximum and average lifespan.
  • Healthcare science – all the sciences related to the overall improvement of physical well-being of humans.
  • Medicine – science and art of healing. It encompasses a variety of health care practices evolved to maintain and restore health by the prevention and treatment of illness.
    • Anesthesia – a way to control pain during a surgery or procedure by using medicine called anesthetics.
    • Clinical research
    • Diabetes – a group of metabolic diseases in which the person has high blood glucose (blood sugar) above 200mg/dl, either because insulin production is inadequate, or because the body's cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both.
    • Dentistry – branch of medicine that is involved in the study, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of diseases, disorders and conditions of the mouth, maxillofacial area and the adjacent and associated structures (teeth) and their impact on the human body.
    • Emergency medicine – medical specialty involving care for undifferentiated, unscheduled patients with acute illnesses or injuries that require immediate medical attention. Emergency physicians undertake acute investigations and interventions to resuscitate and stabilize patients.
    • Obstetrics – medical specialty dealing with the care of all women's reproductive tracts and their children during pregnancy (prenatal period), childbirth and the postnatal period.
    • Trauma & Orthopedics – medical specialty dealing with bones, joints and operative management of trauma.
    • Psychiatry – medical specialty devoted to the study and treatment of mental disorders. These mental disorders include various affective, behavioural, cognitive and perceptual abnormalities.
      • Autism a mental condition, present from early childhood, characterized by great difficulty in communicating and forming relationships with other people and in using language and abstract concepts.
      • Psychiatric survivors movement – is a diverse association of individuals who either currently access mental health services (known as consumers or service users), or who are survivors of interventions by psychiatry, or who are ex-patients of mental health.
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Lists of topics   (all)

Medicine
Acronyms in healthcare • Abbreviations  (for medical organizations and personnel) • Alternative medicine • Pharmaceutical Drugs • Psychiatric drugs (by condition treated) • Psychotherapies • Reference ranges for common blood tests • Surgical procedures • Symptoms
Diseases
Genetic disorders • Infectious diseases • Mental illnesses • Notifiable diseases • Neurological disorders • List of DSM-IV codes
Foods and Nutrition
Antioxidants in food • B vitamins • Beverages • Cuisines (African • Americas • Asian • European • Oceanic) • Diets • Foods (Food origins • Fruit • Herbs and spices • Meat • Nuts • Prepared foods • Seafood • Seeds • Vegetables) • Food additives (Codex Alimentarius) • Macronutrients • Micronutrients • Nootropics (smart drugs) • Poor nutrition
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Related portals   (all)

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Categories

Main categories: Health, Self care, and Healthcare occupations
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