Portal:Forestry

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search


Introduction

Forestry work in Austria

Forestry is the science and craft of creating, managing, using, conserving, and repairing forests, woodlands, and associated resources for human and environmental benefits. Forestry is practiced in plantations and natural stands. The science of forestry has elements that belong to the biological, physical, social, political and managerial sciences.

Modern forestry generally embraces a broad range of concerns, in what is known as multiple-use management, including the provision of timber, fuel wood, wildlife habitat, natural water quality management, recreation, landscape and community protection, employment, aesthetically appealing landscapes, biodiversity management, watershed management, erosion control, and preserving forests as "sinks" for atmospheric carbon dioxide. A practitioner of forestry is known as a forester. Other common terms are: a verderer, or a silviculturalist. Silviculture is narrower than forestry, being concerned only with forest plants, but is often used synonymously with forestry.

Forest ecosystems have come to be seen as the most important component of the biosphere, and forestry has emerged as a vital applied science, craft, and technology.

Forestry is an important economic segment in various industrial countries. For example, in Germany, forests cover nearly a third of the land area, wood is the most important renewable resource, and forestry supports more than a million jobs and about €181 billion of value to the German economy each year.

Selected article

Sustainable forest management (SFM) is the management of forests according to the principles of sustainable development.

A definition of SFM was developed by the Ministerial Conference on the Protection of Forests in Europe MCPFE), and has since been adopted by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

FOREST EUROPE and FAO define sustainable forest management as:

The stewardship and use of forests and forest lands in a way, and at a rate, that maintains their biodiversity, productivity, regeneration capacity, vitality and their potential to fulfill, now and in the future, relevant ecological, economic and social functions, at local, national, and global levels, and that does not cause damage to other ecosystems.

The "Forest Principles" adopted at The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 captured the general international understanding of sustainable forest management at that time. A number of sets of criteria and indicators have since been developed to evaluate the achievement of SFM at both the country and management unit level. These were all attempts to codify and provide for independent assessment of the degree to which the broader objectives of sustainable forest management are being achieved in practice. In 2007, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Non-Legally Binding Instrument on All Types of Forests. The instrument was the first of its kind, and reflected the strong international commitment to promote implementation of sustainable forest management through a new approach that brings all stakeholders together.


Selected biography

Heinrich Cotta
Heinrich Cotta, German silviculturist and founder of the Royal Saxon Academy of Forestry, is known as a pioneer of scientific forestry. Cotta was a pioneer of modern forestry, and was a catalyst concerning the transition from "timber production" to forestry as a scientific discipline. He was interested in all aspects of forestry, including studies involving long-term seeding, establishment of forested areas, and tree-cutting based on mathematic practices. Cotta's methodology was based on a geometric survey of the forest, where calculations of the wood mass of individual trees as well as the yield of the entire forested region were made. By way of these calculations an estimate for the monetary worth of a forest could be assessed. In 1804 Cotta was the first to suggest the concept of a "volume table", which was a chart that was introduced decades later to aid in the estimation of standing timber volume.


In the news

  • November 14, 2013: "Forest change mapped by Google Earth". BBC News.
  • May 31, 2013: "East Africa: EAC Moots Improvement of Regional Forestry, Trade". The New Times.* May 24, 2013: "Democratic polemic policies: the new Brazilian forestry code". The World Outline.
  • May 14, 2013: "Rainforest plays critical role in hydropower generation". BBC News.
  • May 9, 2013: "Creating Better Forestry Certification Programs through Competition". Forbes Magazine.
Current events on Wikinews

Things to do


Here are some tasks awaiting attention:

Selected images

Did you know?

...that Dr. Joseph Rothrock is known as the "Father of Forestry" in Pennsylvania, and is the namesake for Rothrock State Forest?
Other "Did you know" facts... Read more...

Subcategories

Category puzzle

Additional categories

Related portals

Topics

WikiProjects

Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Wikibooks
Books

Commons
Media

Wikinews 
News

Wikiquote 
Quotations

Wikisource 
Texts

Wikiversity
Learning resources

Wiktionary 
Definitions

Wikidata 
Database

Web resources

  • Forestry: An International Journal of Forest Research (Oxford Journals). (All 2011-2012 articles are available for free viewing)
  • U.K. Forestry Commissions – Forest Research
  • U.S. Forest Service Research & Development

Purge server cache

Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Portal:Forestry&oldid=892057046"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Forestry
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Portal:Forestry"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA