Portal:Final Fantasy

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Introduction

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Final Fantasy (ファイナルファンタジー, Fainaru Fantajī) is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and is developed and owned by Square Enix (formerly Square). The franchise centers around a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs), but includes motion pictures, anime, printed media, and other merchandise. The first game in the series, published in 1987, was conceived by Sakaguchi as his last-ditch effort in the game industry; the title was a success and spawned sequels. The video game series has since branched into other genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm.

Although most Final Fantasy installments are supposedly independent stories with different settings and main characters, they feature identical elements that define the franchise. Recurring elements include plot themes, character names, and game mechanics. Plots center on a group of heroes battling a great evil while exploring the characters' internal struggles and relationships. Character names are frequently derived from the history, languages, and mythologies of cultures worldwide.

The series has been commercially and critically successful; it is Square Enix's best selling video game franchise, with more than 100 million units sold, and one of the best-selling video game franchises. It was awarded a star on the Walk of Game in 2006, and holds seven Guinness World Records in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition 2008. The series is well known for its innovation, visuals, and music, such as the inclusion of full motion videos, photo-realistic character models, and orchestrated music by Nobuo Uematsu. Final Fantasy has been a driving force in the video game industry, and the series has affected Square Enix's business practices and its relationships with other video game developers. It has also introduced many features now common in role-playing video games and has been credited with helping to popularize console-based RPGs in markets outside Japan.

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Selected article

Final Fantasy Tactics (ファイナルファンタジータクティクス, Fainaru Fantajī Takutikusu) is a tactical role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix) for the Sony PlayStation video game console. It is the first game of the Final Fantasy Tactics series and was released in Japan in June 1997 and in the United States in January 1998. The game combines thematic elements of the Final Fantasy video game series with a game engine and battle system unlike those previously seen in the franchise. In contrast to other 32-bit era Final Fantasy titles, Final Fantasy Tactics uses a 3D, isometric, rotatable playing field, with bitmap sprite characters.

Final Fantasy Tactics is set in a fictional medieval-inspired kingdom called Ivalice created by Yasumi Matsuno. The game's story follows Ramza Beoulve, a highborn cadet who finds himself thrust into the middle of an intricate military conflict known as The Lion War, where two opposing noble factions are coveting the throne of the kingdom. As the story progresses, Ramza and his allies discover a sinister plot behind the war.

A spinoff title, Final Fantasy Tactics Advance, was released for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance in 2003 and a sequel to that title, Final Fantasy Tactics A2: Grimoire of the Rift, was released in 2007 for the Nintendo DS. Various other games have also utilized the Ivalice setting, including Vagrant Story for the PlayStation and Final Fantasy XII for the PlayStation 2. An enhanced port of Final Fantasy Tactics, Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions, was released in 2007 as part of Square Enix's Ivalice Alliance project. Overall, the game received positive reviews from gaming magazines and websites and has become a cult classic since its release. As of August 2011, the game had sold over 2.4 million copies worldwide.

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Selected list

Seven thick large paperback books, each with different Japanese writing on the binding, wrapped in plastic, sitting on a shelf in a row

Square, and later Square Enix, has produced a number of different strategy guide books for many of their games, similar to those produced by many other video game companies. Beginning in 1999, Square began to produce a line of companion books that focused on artwork, developer interviews, and background information on the fictional worlds and characters in the games rather than on gameplay details. These books cover many of Square Enix's video game series, but almost two-thirds of them focus on the Final Fantasy series.

The first series of these books were the Perfect Works series, written and published by the Square subsidiary DigiCube. They produced three books between 1998 and 1999 before the line was stopped in favor of the Ultimania (アルティマニア, Arutimania) series, a portmanteau of ultimate and mania. This series of books is written by Studio BentStuff, who had previously written game guides for Square for Final Fantasy VII. They were published by DigiCube until the company was dissolved in 2003, and since then by Square Enix. Dozens of books in the series have been produced since 1999, sometimes with multiple books written per game or revised editions published years afterwards. One of the books, Final Fantasy IX Ultimania Online, was solely published online as part of an experiment by Square with online content delivery. The Ultimania series had sold over 10 million books by July 2007.

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Final Fantasy series

Main series: Final Fantasy • II • III • IV • V • VI • VII • VIII • IX • X • XI • XII • XIII • XIV (A Realm Reborn) • XV
Compilations and collections: I-II • III DS • Collection • Anthology • Chronicles • Origins • Dawn of Souls
Related titles: Mystic Quest • Ehrgeiz • Dissidia (012) • The 4 Heroes of Light • Dimensions • Airborne Brigade • Theatrhythm • Artniks • All the Bravest
Related series: Chocobo • Crystal Chronicles • Fortune Street • Kingdom Hearts • Mana • SaGa • Tactics
Films and animation: Advent Children • Last Order • Legend of the Crystals • The Spirits Within • Unlimited • Kingsglaive • Brotherhood
Overall: Media (Video games) • Character design • Gameplay (Character jobs) • Music
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Related Portals

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Video game series: Mario · Pokémon · Sonic · Zelda

Companies and hardware: Nintendo · PlayStation · Sega · SNK · Sony · Xbox

Related WikiProjects

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Parent project: Gamepad.svg WikiProject Video games

Other projects and task forces: WikiProject Adventure games · WikiProject Anime and manga · Bethesda task force · BioWare task force · Nintendo task force · PlayStation task force · WikiProject Pokémon · Retro games task force · Xbox task force


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