Portal:Drink

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D r i n k

A portal dedicated to all beverages

The Drink Portal

A drink, in this case a glass of port wine.

Drinks, or beverages, are liquids specifically prepared for human consumption. In addition to basic needs, beverages form part of the culture of human society.

Despite the fact that most beverages, including juice, soft drinks, and carbonated drinks, have some form of water in them; water itself is often not classified as a beverage, and the word beverage has been recurrently defined as not referring to water.

Essential to the survival of all organisms, water has historically been an important and life-sustaining drink to humans. Excluding fat, water composes approximately 70% of the human body by mass. It is a crucial component of metabolic processes and serves as a solvent for many bodily solutes. Health authorities have historically suggested at least eight glasses, eight fluid ounces each, of water per day (64 fluid ounces, or 1.89 litres), and the British Dietetic Association recommends 1.8 litres. The United States Environmental Protection Agency has determined that the average adult actually ingests 2.0 litres per day.

Distilled (pure) water is rarely found in nature. Spring water, a natural resource from which much bottled water comes, is generally imbued with minerals. Tap water, delivered by domestic water systems in developed nations, refers to water piped to homes through a tap. All of these forms of water are commonly drunk, often purified through filtration.

An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of an alcohol includes many other compounds. Alcoholic beverages, such as wine, beer, and liquor have been part of human culture and development for 8,000 years.

Non-alcoholic beverages often signify drinks that would normally contain alcohol, such as beer and wine but are made with less than .5 percent alcohol by volume. The category includes drinks that have undergone an alcohol removal process such as non-alcoholic beers and de-alcoholized wines.

Drink and Beverage WikiProjects

Goblet Glass (Banquet).svg

WikiProject Food & Drink is an association of Wikipedians with an interest in culinary-related subjects. They have come together to co-ordinate the development of food and drink articles here on Wikipedia as well as the many subjects related to food such as foodservice, catering and restaurants. If you wish to learn more about these subjects as well as get involved, please visit the Food & Drink Wikiproject page to see how you can help!

Beyond the general culinary interests, several groups of Wikipedians have banded together for beverage-specific projects covering their favorite types of drinks. If any of these subjects pique your interest, please feel free to visit their projects. These groups would love you to have you participate!

Cocktail-strainer.jpg Stein Glass (Beer).svg Pint Glass (Pub).svg Irish Coffee Glass (Mug).svg Shot Glass (Standard).svg Goblet Glass (Teardrop).svg
WikiProject
Bartending
WikiProject
Beer
Pubs
Taskforce
Beverages
Task Force
WikiProject
Spirits
WikiProject
Wine

Selected article

A bartender
A bartender (barman, barkeeper, barmaid, mixologist, tapster among other names) serves beverages behind a bar in a bar, pub, tavern, or similar establishment. This usually includes alcoholic beverages of some kind, such as beer (both draft and bottled), wine, and/or cocktails, as well as soft drinks or other non-alcoholic beverages. They "tend the bar". A bartender may own the bar they tend or be simply an employee. Barkeeper carries a stronger connotation of being the purveyor i.e. ownership.

In addition to their core beverage-serving responsibility, bartenders also:

  • take payment from customers (and sometimes the waiters or waitresses);
  • maintain the liquor, garnishes, glassware, and other supplies or inventory for the bar (though some establishments have barbacks who help with these duties);
  • In establishments where cocktails are served, bartenders are expected to be able to properly mix hundreds to thousands of different drinks.

Bartenders also usually serve as the public image of the bar they tend, contributing to as well as reflecting the atmosphere of the bar. In some establishments focused strictly on the food, this can mean the bartender is all but invisible. On the other extreme, some establishments make the bartender part of the entertainment, expected perhaps to engage in flair bartending or other forms of entertainment such as those exemplified in the films Cocktail and Coyote Ugly. Some bars might be known for bartenders who serve the drinks and otherwise leave a patron alone while others want their bartenders to be good listeners and offer counseling (or a "shoulder to cry on") as required. Good bartenders help provide a steady clientele by remembering the favored drinks of regulars, having recommendations on hand for local nightlife beyond the bar, or other unofficial duties. They are sometimes called upon for answers to a wide variety of questions on topics such as sports trivia, directions, or the marital status of other patrons.


Selected person

Jim Beam distillery as viewed from the Beam House.
The Beam Family

The Beam family founded and operate the Jim Beam distillery that produces the bourbon of the same name.

During the late 1700’s a group of immigrants from Germany came to America who would leave a lasting impression on the American spirits business. Johannes "Jacob" Beam (1770–1834) found the land rich for farming and began experimenting with the corn and grains that grew on his farm, blending them with the clear spring water that flowed nearby. The mix was run through a still and aged in barrels, producing a liquid that came to become known as bourbon, possibly named after Bourbon County, Kentucky. Jacob Beam sold his first barrels of corn whiskey around 1795. The whiskey was first called Old Jake Beam, and the distillery was known as Old Tub.

David Beam (1802–1854) took his father’s responsibilities in 1820 at the age of 18, expanding distribution of the family’s bourbon during a time of industrial revolution. David M. Beam (1833–1913) in 1854 moved the distillery to Nelson County to capitalize on the growing network of railroad lines connecting states. Colonel James B. Beam (1864–1947) managed the family business before and after Prohibition, rebuilding the distillery in 1933 in Clermont, Kentucky, near his Bardstown home. From this point forward, the bourbon would be called “Jim Beam Bourbon” after the Colonel. T. Jeremiah Beam (1899–1977) started working at the Clear Springs distillery in 1913, later earning the title of Master Distiller and overseeing operations at the new Clermont facility.James B.Beam Distilling Company was founded in 1935 by Harry L. Homel, Oliver Jacobson, H. Blum and Jerimiah Beam. Jeremiah Beam eventually gained full ownership and opened a second distillery near Boston, Kentucky, in 1954. Jeremiah later teamed up with child-hood friend Jimberlain Joseph Quinn, to expand the enterprise.



Selected ingredient

Sacharomyces cerevisiae cells in DIC microscopy.
Yeasts are eukaryotic microorganisms classified in the kingdom Fungi, with about 1,500 species currently described; they dominate fungal diversity in the oceans. Most reproduce asexually by budding, although a few do so by binary fission. Yeasts are unicellular, although some species with yeast forms may become multicellular through the formation of a string of connected budding cells known as pseudohyphae, or false hyphae as seen in most molds. Yeast size can vary greatly depending on the species, typically measuring 3–4 µm in diameter, although some yeasts can reach over 40 µm.

The yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used in baking and fermenting alcoholic beverages for thousands of years. It is also extremely important as a model organism in modern cell biology research, and is the most thoroughly researched eukaryotic microorganism. Researchers have used it to gather information into the biology of the eukaryotic cell and ultimately human biology. Other species of yeast, such as Candida albicans, are opportunistic pathogens and can cause infection in humans. Yeasts have recently been used to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells, and produce ethanol for the biofuel industry.

Yeasts do not form a specific taxonomic or phylogenetic grouping. At present it is estimated that only 1% of all yeast species have been described. The term "yeast" is often taken as a synonym for S. cerevisiae, but the phylogenetic diversity of yeasts is shown by their placement in both divisions Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. The budding yeasts ("true yeasts") are classified in the order Saccharomycetales.

More selected ingredients... Used in Beer, Wine, Distilled beverages Read more...


Drink news

Drink news from Wikinews · Help write more articles!
  • October 17: Police shut down Edmonton pizza restaurant for illegally delivering alcohol
  • April 4: Genetically modified dairy cows produce 'human milk'
  • August 4: Nine dead in shooting rampage at Connecticut beer warehouse
  • May 27: Bottled water concerns health experts
  • February 3: Wikinews Shorts: February 3, 2010

Selected quote

And malt does more than Milton can
     To justify God's ways to man.
— A. E. Housman
A Shropshire Lad LXII. Terence, this is stupid stuff


Did you know...

Selected picture

A classic martini
Credit: Chris Corwin

A classic martini with a twist of lime


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Categories

Category puzzle

The following entries are categories relating to drinks:

Beverages


Drink lists

Topics related to Beverages

The following are topics relating to drinks:

General topics: Bartending  • Bottling • Refrigeration
Alcoholic beverages: Beer • Brandy • Brewing • Caffeinated alcoholic drinks • Cocktails • Distillation • Fermentation • Liqueur • Proof • Schnapps • Vodka • Whiskey • Wine
Soft Drinks: Carbonation • Coffee • Cola • Juice • Root beer • Soda water • Lithia water • Steeping • Tea


Associated Wikimedia

Drink on Wikinews     Drink on Wikiquote     Drink on Wikibooks     Drink on Wikisource     Drink on Wikicommons
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