Portal:Discrimination

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Discrimination

Disclogo1.svg Discrimination within sociology is the prejudicial treatment of an individual based on their membership in a certain group or category. Examples of categories on which discrimination can be seen include race and ethnicity, religion, sex/gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, height, weight, disability, employment circumstances, age, and species.

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Lesbophobia is a term which describes prejudice, discrimination, harassment or abuse, either specifically targeting a lesbian woman, based on her lesbian identity, or, more generally, targeting lesbians as a class. It has also been defined as including "the fear that women have of loving other women, as well as the fear that men have of women not loving them."

Some lesbians use the more general term homophobia to describe this sort of prejudice or behavior, but others believe that the terms homosexual and homophobia do not adequately reflect the specific concerns of lesbians. In particular, some lesbians argue that they experience the double discrimination of both classic homophobia and sexism. The term lesbophobia then distinguishes lesbian-specific discrimination from the male gay experience.

One stereotype that has been identified as lesbophobic is the notion that female athletes are predominantly lesbians. Lesbophobia can also be found among gay men, manifest in the perceived subordination of lesbian issues in the campaign for gay rights

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1943 Colored Waiting Room Sign.jpg

A sign points the way to a "Colored Waiting Room", outside a Greyhound bus station in Rome, Georgia, United States, in 1943. The sign refers to a room where blacks were allowed to wait for the bus; "colored" was the common euphemism for African Americans at the time, especially in the Southern United States, though the term is now considered offensive.

The provision of separate facilities for white people and black people was the result of a series of state laws, collectively nicknamed Jim Crow laws, making racial segregation the rule of law in many Southern states beginning in 1876. While these laws decreed that such provisions were to be "separate but equal", in practice facilities provided for whites were assuredly of better quality and maintenance than those for blacks. Various Jim Crow laws remained in effect until they were made illegal throughout the U.S. by the Civil Rights Act of 1965.

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