Portal:Current events/September 2012

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2012
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September 2012 was the ninth month of that leap year. The month, which began on a Saturday, ended on a Sunday after 30 days.

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from September 2012.

Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Environment and health
  • Tent cabins in Yosemite National Park, U.S., are closed after officials notify 3,100 recent visitors of an outbreak of Hantavirus. (Los Angeles Times)
  • A nuclear reactor in Belgium shows up to 0.3 m-depth signs of erosion weakening the 1.2 m outer reinforced concrete mantle, three times deeper than previously reported. The owner and the nuclear regulator deny any risk since the reactor was already shut down due to another issue. (Le Soir)
  • Now middle-aged victims of Thalidomide (Softenon, Contergan)'s mutilating effects on embryos say the first ever apologies from the manufacturer Grünenthal GmbH are "insulting". (AFP via The Globe and Mail)
International relations
  • 16th Summit of the Non-Aligned Movement in Tehran:
    • The summit is closed with accepting a 600-page final document that mainly focuses on the Palestinian issue as well as on Iran's nuclear energy program, but makes no mention of the Syrian civil war. A Chinese state commentary qualifies the summit as an "important" diplomatic "accomplishment from Iran", having hosted "leaders and delegates of over 100 countries". (PressTV) (AP via Times Online) (Xinhua)
    • The closing document reaffirms the determination of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) to transform the global management system based on the principles of justice, peace and amity. (PressTV) (SunStar)
    • The seventeenth summit is to be held in Venezuela. (The Himalayan Times)
Politics and elections
Science
  • Scientists find that middle-class children in Flanders are 15 times more often diagnosed with a learning disorder than poor children. (De Morgen)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • The Moody's agency changes its outlook on the European Union's Aaa credit rating from stable to negative. (Bloomberg via New York Times)
Disasters
  • The North Korean state news agency says Typhoon-15 (Bolaven) left 48 people dead and caused major damage. (KCNA)
Health and environment
  • Lebanon bans smoking in closed public places like restaurants and cafés. (The Daily Star)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • Swaziland virgins perform an annual reed dance, paying homage to the king, pleasing tourists and compatriots. (Reuters)
Science and technology
  • Cracks in 3 of the 21 wooden beams of a European Parliament hemicycle roof lead to the temporary closure, among others, of the plenary debate room; parliamentary operations are reportedly unaffected. (European Voice) (Public Service Europe)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • Airbus expects a worldwide total demand for 28,200 civil aircraft by the year 2031, more than doubling today's fleet in operation. (MSN Malaysia)
  • Cabin crew for the German airline Lufthansa go on strike causing disruption to hundreds of flights. (Reuters)
  • McDonald's plans to open two fully vegetarian fast food restaurants at the pilgrimage sites of Vaishno Devi and Amritsar, north India. (Financial Times) (Financial Times)
Disasters
  • A passenger bus traveling between Marrakesh and Ouarzazate crashes in a ravine in southern Morocco, killing at least 42 people and injuring up to 25 others. (AFP via Hindustan Times)
International relations
Law and crime
  • A South Korean court orders the government to compensate a fisherman with 2.5 billion won (€ 1.75 million); he was falsely accused of spying for North Korea. (Yonhap)
  • Egypt's former culture minister Farouk Hosny is to face corruption charges. (AFP via Google News)
  • Osvaldo Rivera is the suspect jailed in Camden County, New Jersey for the stabbing to death of a 6-year-old boy and the attempted murder of the boy's 12-year-old sister. Authorities say he was high on PCP-laced marijuana. (AP via Yahoo! News)
  • Police in Cambodia say The Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Svartholm, who was arrested on Sunday, "is to be deported", saying it's up to Sweden to decide where and not specifying when. There is no extradition agreement between the two countries. (BBC)
  • The AntiSec hacker operation publishes 1 million edited Apple iOS unique device identifiers of the 12 million it claims to have "obtained" from a FBI laptop. (Silicon Republic) (Al Jazeera English) (The Guardian)
  • A court in Bahrain upholds the sentences of Arab Spring opposition figures condemned for plotting to overthrow the Western-allied government. Eight of the twenty opponents are confirmed imprisoned for life. (AP via Google News)
  • The United States Department of Justice files papers in court documenting BP's "gross negligence and willful misconduct" over the April 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. (Reuters)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • Scientists develop a "magic carpet" with optical fibers to help prevent elderly people from falling by a warning when it detects unusual footsteps. (Daily Mail)
  • Beijing and Shanghai place orders for the world's longest bus, the 101 foot (31 m), five-axle, four-steering-axle, three-tiered AutoTram. It carries 256 passengers and costs about $10 million a piece. Due to advanced electronics, it is said to be as maneuverable and precise as a conventional bus. (Daily Mail)
  • The opening date of the new airport serving the Berlin area is delayed again, until late October 2013. (The Local)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements is published. For the first time, a browsable, analysable overview of the four million regulatory regions, or functional elements of the human genome found up to now, is made available to the general public. At least 80% of the human genome is biologically active, rather than mainly junk DNA as once believed. (ENCODE) (Nature)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
Law and crime
International relations
Politics and elections
Religion and spirituality
  • A Christian lobbyist's kin defend him after he claims homosexuality reduces life expectancy more than smoking and should therefore be discouraged. He himself states he "was not comparing homosexuality with smoking at all." (Sydney Morning Herald) (SBS)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
  • Some details emerge, but no suspect nor a motive, about Wednesday's murder of four people in the foothills of the French Alps. (CBS News) (CNN)
  • A former Premier League football youth star is jailed for life with a minimum term of 10 years after being convicted of murdering his girlfriend, who sustained at least 60 stab wounds to the head and body. (BBC)
Politics
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
  • A tractor is hit by a train in central Romania, killing eight passengers in the tractor trailer. (Bucharest Herald)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
  • The Hong Kong government backs down on plans to introduce Chinese patriotism classes in its schools after weeks of protests. (Radio Television Hong Kong) (BBC)
Science and technology
Sports
Armed attacks and conflicts
  • Syrian civil war:
    • A main water supply pipe serving central Aleppo is allegedly struck by a government air strike. Hundreds of thousands of inhabitants are left without drinking water. The Aleppo governor says "sabotage" damaged "two pumps serving three districts" and repair work is ongoing. Food, cooking gas and electricity are reported to be in short supply. (The New York Times) (AP via CBC) (Xinhua)
    • Two car bombs explode near a hospital in Aleppo that was recently turned into an army barracks. At least 17 people are reported killed and more than 40 others injured. (Reuters)
    • Russia calls for a government of Syrian unity. (AFP via Yahoo! NZ News)
  • A wave of attacks kill more than 100 people and injure 350 others across Iraq on the day the death sentence against Tariq al-Hashimi is made public. (AP via CBS News)
  • Local authorities report that suspected Taliban abduct and then kill six civilians in the Maidan Wardak province of Afghanistan. (Long War Journal)
International relations
  • Nestor Louis Michel calls Rwandan President Paul Kagame a "great leader" ("groot leider"). Kagame has been accused of war crimes during Rwanda's invasion of the DR Congo in 1996, and of having led a subsequent proxy war against the DR Congo by arming the CNDP until January 20, 2009. Congo currently accuses Rwandan defence officials of supporting a new destabilisation of East Congo. Louis Michel urges the international community for "more time" to "objectivate the facts first" before taking any action. (De Zondag, p. 12-13, in Dutch)
  • Closing their annual summit, APEC leaders report progress in Vladivostok over environmental and trade barrier issues; some territorial issues remain unsolved. (Wall Street Journal)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • Elections for the 70-member Legislative Council are held in Hong Kong. Forty seats are elected by direct popular vote, the remainder are attributed by the "functional constituencies": business and special interest groups. China has promised a fully popular vote by the year 2020; the roadmap is still being laid out. (BBC) (Xinhua) (Pakistan Today) (Washington Post)
  • Tens of thousands of Japanese people demonstrate for the closure of Futenma airbase (MCAS) in crowded Ginowan, Okinawa. They also protest the deployment of twelve MV-22 Osprey aircraft. They consider the plane as the "most dangerous" in the world. (Star Advertiser) (AFP via Google News)
Sports
Science and technology
  • The Indian space agency puts into orbit its heaviest foreign satellite yet, in a streak of 21 consecutive successful PLSV launches. (Hindustan Times)
Armed attacks and conflicts
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
  • Floods and landslides caused by heavy rain kill at least 29 people in northern and central Vietnam. (AP via Seattle PI)
  • Hurricane and tropical storm warnings are issued for parts of the Canadian province Newfoundland and Labrador as Tropical Storm Leslie approaches. (National Hurricane Centre)
  • Three people are killed and several others seriously injured after a coach taking people home from the Isle of Wight-based music festival, Bestival 2012 crashes in Surrey, England. (BBC)
Health and environment
International relations
Law and crime
  • Three boys aged eight and nine are killed when a bazooka grenade, left over from a war in Cambodia, explodes. (AP via ABC News) (Jane's)
  • Tariq al-Hashimi rejects the charges leading to his death sentence in Baghdad on Sunday. He, being a Sunni, claims to be a "target" of Shiite prime minister Nouri al-Maliki. He refuses to return to Iraq for an appeal as long as, according to him, the judicial system is "corrupt". He claims to put the verdict "on his chest as a medal". Al-Qaeda says "black days" are ahead. The reaction of Iraqi people on the street generally welcomes a fair rule of law but is wary of political influencing and sectarianism. (ABC News) (Euronews)
  • According to a parliamentary answer by the ministry of health, the value of a life lost during a clinical trial is 2.2 lakh rupees ($ 4,000) in India in 2011. This number is the average compensation paid for deaths during clinical trials. No rules governing compensations for clinical trial-related injury or death have been approved by the Parliament of India yet. (IRNA)
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed attacks and conflicts
  • A car bomb targeting Yemen's defence minister, Mohammed Nasser Ahmed, kills at least twelve people, including seven bodyguards of the minister and five civilians in Sana. (The New York Times)
  • In Somalia, more than fifty Al-Shabaab fighters are killed as African Union Kenyan peacekeepers, and the Somali National Army, continue their march towards the port city of Kismayo. (Xinhua)
  • War in Afghanistan (2001-present):
    • Taliban bombard Bagram Air Base. They kill three people and destroy a helicopter, wounding three personnel on board. (USA Today)
    • A suicide bombing in Herat province kills six people including the bomber. (USA Today) (Dawn) (Khaama)
  • A suicide bombing in front of a police station in the western Istanbul suburb of Sultangazi kills a policeman, the bomber, and injures several others. The leftist group Dev Sol claims responsibility. (BBC)
  • 2012 Benghazi attack: Militiamen storm the US consulate in Benghazi. Reports indicate it has been burned down and looted. AFP reports a source saying rocket-propelled grenades were fired at the consulate. The U.S. Ambassador in Libya, J. Christopher Stevens, and three other people are killed. (BBC) (Reuters) (AFP via MSN Philippines) (Reuters) (AFP via Star Africa) (Wall Street Journal) (CNN)
  • Three people are found shot dead in a car near Corte, on the French island of Corsica. (The Telegraph)
  • Two people are shot dead at close range in the center of Milan. Hours later, another shooting in plain view shakes the financial capital of Italy. (Reuters)
Business and economy
  • Moody's warns the United States that it faces a downgrade in its credit rating before 2014 if the government fails to act on managing its debt. (Los Angeles Times) (AP via Boston.com) (Forbes)
  • Japan's Minister of State for Financial Services Tadahiro Matsushita is found dead in his home in Tokyo. His death has been ruled a suicide and may further complicate matters for the ruling party which has been battered by internal divisions and parliamentary gridlock. Finance minister Jun Azumi has been named to succeed Matsushita. (CNN via Financial Times) (Reuters via Kyodo News) (Wall Street Journal) (Daily Yomiuri)
Disasters
  • At least 29 people are killed and 11 injured after a bus runs off a mountain highway in western Nepal. (AP via NineMSN)
International relations
  • Senkaku Islands dispute:
    • China dispatches two Chinese Marine Surveillance patrol boats to the islands in order to "safeguard its sovereignty" over the territory. (CNN) (Xinhua)
    • Japan formally nationalizes three of the disputed Senkaku Islands. (The Japan Times), (Mainichi Shimbun)
    • China's Ministry of Defence says the nationalization of the disputed Senkaku Islands by Japan is "illegal and invalid"; that it would closely monitor the "evolution of the situation" and "reserve the right to take reciprocal measures". (Xinhua)
    • The Chief Cabinet Secretary of Japan, Osamu Fujimura, said transferring the islands' ownership from an individual to the state government should pose no problem to any other country or territory. (The Japan Times), (RTTNews)
    • China summons Japanese ambassador Uichiro Niwa to lodge a protest over Japan's nationalization of the Senkaku Islands. Beijing warned it will take "necessary measures" to protect its claim on the islands. (Bloomberg) (The Hindu)
    • Taiwan recalls its envoy to Japan in protest. (CNA via Focus Taiwan)
    • Japan announces that Shinichi Nishimiya will succeed Uichiro Niwa. (Daily Yomiuri) (Asahi Shimbun)
    • United States Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs Kurt M. Campbell urges both Japan and China to not escalate tensions; reminds both nations that they are the "cockpit of the global economy", that the "stakes could not be bigger", and for leaders from both countries to "keep that squarely in mind". (Reuters)
Law and crime
  • Newly declassified documents confirm that the United States deliberately ignored Soviet involvement in the 1940 Katyn massacre, despite credible evidence to the contrary provided no later than 1943. While until 1945 this choice could be explained as World War II grand strategy, it is not known why the White House remained silent on the matter until now. (AP via New York Daily News)
  • A White House spokesperson says that a Presidential executive order is being considered to ensure the United States' cybersecurity if Congress remains deadlocked over a "CISPA" law. (Russia Today) (Federal News Radio)
  • Sources tell the Frankfurter Allgemeine newspaper that the German military spying agency MAD tried to recruit Uwe Mundlos in 1995. Mundlos refused to cooperate and subsequently participated in ten terrorist murders with the nazi group NSU. He died in 2011; police say he committed suicide. (Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung)
  • Egypt presses formal charges against Gamel and Alaa Mubarak, sons of ousted president Hosni Mubarak, and Ahmed Shafiq, a recent presidential candidate, over alleged illegal acquisition of land. An arrest warrant has been issued against Shafiq, now a resident in the United Arab Emirates. (The Daily)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
  • Police in Bosnia and Herzegovina arrest 25 people on suspicion of multiple murders, drug-trafficking and robbery in the biggest crackdown on organised crime since the Bosnian War. (IOL)
  • A Cambodian journalist is found murdered in the boot of his car, after reporting on illegal logging. (Bangkok Post)
  • Aseem Trivedi is granted bail and freed on 13 September 2012. (Times of India)
  • Previously unseen files relating to the 1989 Hillsborough disaster are released to the public. They show police failings, and attempts to shift the blame for the tragedy onto football fans. British Prime Minister David Cameron says he is "profoundly sorry" for what happened. (The Guardian) (BBC)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
International Relations
  • 2012 diplomatic missions attacks:
    • Protestors breach the walls of the U.S. embassy compound in Sana'a, Yemen. Yemeni police fire warning shots in the air and four people are killed. The Egyptian ministry of health says 224 people are injured in demonstrations around the embassy in Cairo. In Kuwait, 500 people gather and chant near the embassy. (BBC) (AFP via Google News)
    • The U.S. deploys destroyers and surveillance drones to Libya to hunt for those responsible for the attack in Benghazi. U.S. officials say they are investigating whether the protests over a film privately produced in the US denigrating the prophet Muhammad were used as a cover by the attackers, rather than being spurred by them. The Libyan Deputy Interior minister says there were two parts in the attack - the second attack was on the safe house of which the location was previously leaked. (CNN) (AP via Detroit News)
    • The US consulate in the suburbs of Berlin, Germany, is briefly evacuated due to suspicions over the contents of an envelope. (Reuters)
    • More details emerge about the privately produced anti-Islam film that sparks unrest in the world. Sam Bacile is also the name a Washington-based activist assumed to initiate forwarding the link last week. One reporter points to the suspected real name of "Abano(u)b Basseley". (Wall Street Journal)
    • In short, Pastor Terry Jones and Copt Washington-based lawyer Morris Sadek are two of the promoters of the film. (AFP by Google)
    • An other person, named Nakoula Basseley Nakoula, self-identified manager of the company that allegedly produced the film, is identified by a security official. (Wall Street Journal) AP via (Columbus Dispatch) (AP via Politico) (Youtube)
  • Newly-appointed Japanese ambassador to China, Shinichi Nishimiya, is found collapsed on a street in Tokyo and hospitalized. (CNN) (Kyodo News)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge begin legal action after the magazine Closer published topless pictures of the Duchess taken during a holiday to France last week, and which their spokesman describes as “a grotesque and totally unjustifiable” invasion of privacy. (BBC) (The Telegraph)
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Science and technology
  • HTV-3 detaches from the ISS for a burial in the Pacific Ocean. ATV 3 thrusts the ISS' orbit two kilometers up. TMA-04M will land on 17 September. ATV-003, named Edoardo Amaldi, is planned to disconnect on September 25th and burn up itself and a load of trash in the atmosphere over the same ocean. (RIA Novosti) (RIA) (ESA)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Syrian civil war:
    • One of Assad's relatives, who was a Syrian Air Force officer, defects from the Syrian government. (Ynet News)
    • Special envoy Lakhdar Brahimi says the Syrian crisis is a "very, very serious and dangerous" threat of breaching world peace. (Ynet News)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Environment and health
International relations
  • Senkaku Islands dispute:
    • Anti-Japanese protests spread in China over the disputed Senkaku Islands. (Al Jazeera)
    • Reports surface of Japanese nationals in China being physically assaulted by Chinese protesters. (Kyodo News via The Japan Times) (Associated Press)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • Chinese Vice President and Paramount Leader-designate Xi Jinping is shown on television for the first time in weeks, debunking rumours of serious illness. (Xinhua) (AFP via Google News)
  • Tens of thousands protest against Putin in Moscow. (Businessweek)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Environment and health
International relations
  • Senkaku Islands dispute:
    • Anti-Japan protesters in China ransack Japanese businesses; set fire to a Panasonic plant in Qingdao. (Bloomberg) (Reuters) (Kyodo News via The Japan Times) (Los Angeles Times)
    • Japanese prime minister Yoshihiko Noda condemns the anti-Japan protests in China. (Wall Street Journal)
  • Japan's ambassador designate to China, Shinichi Nishimiya, dies after suddenly collapsing outside his home in Tokyo on Thursday. (Kyodo News via The Japan Times) (Times of India) (Reuters)
  • US Defence Secretary Leon Panetta urges China and its neighbours not to engage in "provocative behaviour" over maritime border disputes. (Los Angeles Times)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Ugandan police release theatre producer David Cecil on bail after charging him in connection with the staging of The River and the Mountain, a play which references homosexuality. His court date is 18 October, with a two year jail sentence possible. (The Guardian)
  • Writer Sir Salman Rushdie expresses doubt that his 1988 novel The Satanic Verses would be published today because of a climate of "fear and nervousness". (BBC) (The Guardian)
Business and economy
Disasters
  • Typhoon Sanba makes landfall in South Korea near the port of Yeosu causing the cancellation of flights and other transport services; one person is reported dead. (Sky News Australia) (Yonhap)
  • At least 13 people, including ten Indians, are killed in a bus accident in Jubail, Saudi Arabia. (IBN)
International relations
Law and crime
Media and people
Politics and elections
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
  • A fire at a gas facility in Mexico's state-owned oil company, Pemex, claims 26 lives in the border city of Reynosa, Tamaulipas. (AFP)
International relations
  • U.S. presidential candidate Mitt Romney claims Palestinians are committed to the destruction of Israel. (BBC)
  • Senkaku Islands dispute
    • People in over 180 cities of China attend protests sparked by Japan's nationalization of the Senkaku Islands and the 81st anniversary of the Mukden Incident. (Kyodo News via The Japan Times) (Global Times)
    • Japanese companies shut down or scale back production in China for the duration of the protests. (Los Angeles Times) (The Japan Times) (AFP via The Australian)
    • Japanese Coast Guard ships await the arrival of 1000 Chinese fishing boats dispatched by China to the waters around the Senkaku Islands in order to assert its claim on the territory. (The Japan Times)
    • Japan's former ambassador to China, Yuji Miyamato, has emerged as the leading candidate to replace the late Shinichi Nishimiya, who died last Sunday. (Kyodo News via The Japan Times)
    • China says it reserves the right to further action against Japan over the Senkaku Islands, but adds that it hopes for a "peaceful and negotiated solution" to the issue. (Kyodo News via Mainichi Shimbun)
    • Ten Chinese surveillance ships sailed into the contiguous zone off the Senkaku Islands, following a similar incursion by a fishery monitoring ship earlier in the day. (Yomiuri Shimbun)
Law and crime
  • Bahrain's public prosecution charges seven police officers with torturing Shia medics to obtain confessions during the ongoing Bahraini uprising. (Al Jazeera)
  • Two mass graves are discovered in the Tana Delta region of Kenya. (BBC)
  • Two police officers are killed in Greater Manchester. (The Guardian)
Politics and elections
Science
  • Following the world's first mother-to-daughter uterus transplants at the University of Gothenburg two women may now be able to give birth using the wombs in which they were carried. (BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • Teachers go back to work in Chicago after the union leadership votes to suspend its strike while the membership reviews a tentative pact with mayor Rahm Emanuel. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The Czech Republic temporarily imposes a ban on hard liquor after a spate of deaths related to bootleg hard alcohol poisoning. (Los Angeles Times)
Environment and health
  • The cabinet of Yoshihiko Noda reverses a pledge made by the Japanese government earlier in the week to end reliance on nuclear power by the 2030s. (Kyodo News and Jiji Press via The Japan Times)
International relations
  • Senkaku Islands dispute:
    • A man turns himself in to police after throwing smoke bombs into the premises of the Chinese Consulate General in Fukuoka, Japan. (Jiji Press via Yomiuri Shimbun)
    • Police in Hong Kong arrest a man accused of attacking a Japanese couple near the Tsim Sha Tsui promenade on Monday. (Kyodo News via The Japan Times)
    • China's Xi Jinping denounces Japan's nationalization of the Senkaku Islands as a "farce" and that Tokyo should "rein in its behavior." (Reuters via Asahi Shimbun) (Jiji Press)
    • Demonstrators in Taipei gather before Taiwan's Legislative Yuan building chanting anti-Japanese slogans and burning Japanese flags. (Jiji Press via The Japan Times)
    • Protesters in Beijing surround a car transporting US ambassador to China Gary Locke and attack it as it tried to make its way into the gate of the Japanese embassy. (Los Angeles Times)
    • Beijing informs its citizens via mass-text messages that it has imposed a ban on any further anti-Japan protests. (Yomiuri Shimbun)
    • Over 700 Chinese fishing vessels are operating in the contiguous zone surrounding Japan-controlled waters around the Senkaku Islands. The Japan Coast Guard is monitoring the situation. (Kyodo News via The Japan Times)
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Trade unions in India hold a strike over plans to open up supermarkets to international competition. (BBC)
  • AU Optronics was fined $500 million for a global LCD screen price-fixing conspiracy. (AP via Seattle Post-Intelligencer)
Environment and health
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
International relations
Politics and elections
Arts and culture
  • During a Green Day performance at Las Vegas' IHeartRadio music festival, Billie Joe Armstrong became agitated onstage and stopped the band's set midway through their performance. In an expletive-filled rant, Armstrong criticized the event's promoters for allegedly cutting short the band's performance before smashing his guitar and storming off stage.
Science
Armed attacks
  • 2012 diplomatic missions attacks:
    • Demanding the disbandment of armed groups, hundreds of demonstrators attack Ansar al-Sharia and Islamist militia compounds in Benghazi, Libya. Eleven people die in the clashes. Libyan authorities re-take control of deserted strongholds. (AP via ABC News) (AFP via Libération) (The Jerusalem Post)
    • The Libyan government asks the population to discriminate among "legitimate and non-legitimate" militias; Raf Allah al-Sahati, Feb. 17 and Libya Shield are supposedly "legitimate" militias. (AP via ABC News)
  • Syrian civil war:
    • An online video appears to claim that the Free Syrian Army moved its headquarters from Turkey to "liberated areas" inside Syria; Reuters says in Idlib or Aleppo. (BBC) (Reuters)
    • The National Coordination Body, an internal civilian opposition umbrella group in Syria, is to hold a conference in Damascus on Sunday. According to Xinhua, the 28-party conference is cancelled due to internal divisions. (Reuters) (Xinhua)
    • The Lebanese Armed Forces say the Free Syrian Army attacked a Lebanese army border post on Friday. (Daily Star)
    • Activists say dozens of civilians are killed throughout Syria by the Syrian government's artillery shelling of cities. (Bloomberg via Businessweek)
  • Eight people die in clashes between Zaydi rebels and Salafis. The Zaidis oppose the nomination by Al-Islah of new provincial leaders in northern Yemen. (Belga via HLN) (Middle East Online)
Arts and culture
  • The Musée du Louvre in Paris opens a new wing dedicated to Islamic art. It holds 3,000 artifacts from the seventh to the 19th century. An Egyptian Mamluk portal, disassembled in France since 1889, is shown for the first time. (AFP via France 24)
Disasters and accidents
  • The drunken driver of a car, speeding at nearly 200 kilometre (124 miles) per hour, hits a bus stop on Minskaya Street in Moscow. Seven pedestrians who were waiting for the bus were killed. (Ria Novosti) (Xinhua)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Deaths
Disasters and accidents
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • Parliamentary elections are held in Belarus. The opposition sees the vote as undemocratic and boycotts it. (UKPA via Google News)
  • A conference to "rescue Syria" is held in Damascus by the National Coordination Body and around 20 other parties. Twenty eight parties, which are also opposed to the militarization of the conflict, have not participated. The conference calls for a ceasefire and a peaceful political transition to succeed the Assad regime. The armed opposition considers the position as "too lenient on the dictator". (Xinhua) (AP via Washington Post)
Science
  • Researchers find that there are four genetically distinct types of breast cancer. (The New York Times)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • Wang Lijun, the former police chief and vice-mayor of Chongqing, China, is sentenced to 15 years in prison for corruption-related charges and defection. (Global Times) (AP via Google News)
  • Manufacturer Foxconn closes a factory in Taiyuan in China's Shanxi province after a fight breaks out between thousands of workers. (The Sydney Morning Herald)
  • Three bloggers in Vietnam are sentenced to four, ten and twelve years' imprisonment for "anti-state propaganda". (Al Jazeera)
  • Former Israeli minister of industry, trade and labor Ehud Olmert, who is also a former prime minister, is given a fine and a suspended 1-year jail sentence for cronyism while in office. A bribery case related to a housing project in Jerusalem is still being investigated. (Reuters)
  • The US military announces that two US Marines are charged with urinating on Taliban corpses in Afghanistan and failing to stop other misconduct by subordinates. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
Health
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Syrian civil war:
    • Twin explosions near the headquarters of the Syrian Armed Forces in central Damascus kill at least four military guards. (Al Jazeera)
    • Press TV correspondent Maya Nasser is killed by sniper fire while reporting from the scene of twin bomb blasts in Damascus. (The Guardian)
    • Qatar calls for Arab intervention in Syria. (Al Jazeera)
    • Local activists report a massacre of over 40 civilians by the Syrian army in the Damascus suburb of Thiabieh. (TIME)
Business and economy
International relations
  • Russia and Japan schedule a sub-cabinet level meeting for October in Tokyo to discuss the Kuril Islands dispute. (Jiji Press via Yomiuri Shimbun)
  • Senkaku Islands dispute:
    • Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda addresses the UNGA by stating that Japan is committed to a "peaceful solution" to its territorial disputes, but that it intends to "fulfill its responsibility" to protecting its sovereignty. (Yomiuri Shimbun) (NHK World) (AP)
    • China responds to Noda's speech by calling it "self-deceiving" and as a "challenge" to the post-war international order. (Xinhua)
    • Anti-Japan protests are staged outside the UN. (NHK World)
    • ANA and JAL report that over 52,000 seats for flights between China and Japan have been canceled. (Kyodo News via Mainichi Shimbun)
    • Japanese businesses are asked to withdraw their exhibits from the forthcoming Western China International Fair in Chengdu. (Kyodo News via Mainichi Shimbun)
    • Japanese automakers suspend operations in China until after National Day and announce plans to cut output in the country. (Kyodo News)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Health
  • Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Health voices concerns that the novel coronavirus, similar to SARS and reported to have originated from the country, might affect the Hajj, the religious pilgrimage set to occur next month. The ministry suggests that travelers take the necessary precautions. (ABC News)
International relations
  • Senkaku Islands dispute:
    • Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda meets with UN General Secretary Ban Ki-moon, explaining to him that the islands are "Japan's inherent territory" and that "there is no territorial dispute as such". (Yomiuri Shimbun)
    • Tokyo residents demand that the city's municipal government return private donations it had amassed in order to purchase three of the disputed Senkaku Islands. The central government preempted Tokyo's move by acquiring the islands itself earlier this month. (Mainichi Shimbun)
    • Japan's Foreign Minister Koichiro Gemba, states that his country intends to reach out to the international community to seek support for its sovereignty over the disputed islands. (Kyodo News via Mainichi Shimbun)
    • Jia Qinglin meets with Japanese business leaders and lawmakers in Beijing in a bid to ease tensions between China and Japan. (Kyodo News via Mainichi Shimbun) (Xinhua)
    • Former prime minister and newly-elected leader of the LDP Shinzo Abe declares that relations between China and Japan are "inseverable". (Xinhua) (NHK World)
    • President of Taiwan Ma Ying-jeou praises the flotilla of fishermen that sailed to waters around Senkaku Islands earlier in the week in order to assert Taiwan's territorial claim. (NHK World)
    • The UN publicly releases documents from China and Japan detailing their contesting claims. (NHK World)
    • Department store chain Heiwado announce that the costs incurred from damage and looting to its stores in China may reach in excess of $6.5 million. (AFP via AsiaOne) (NHK World)
  • The United States announces that it will seek to lift its ban on imported goods from Myanmar. (Los Angeles Times)
Law and crime
Politics
Science and technology
  • The Mars Curiosity rover, for the first time, discovers what, upon further study, could be determined to be direct evidence of a fast-moving streambed- a past water source- on the planet, moving from speculation to potential proof of past water, a landmark step because such an area would be a logical site for a future base and for the discovery of past life. (Washington Post)
  • Scientists in Japan confirm the 2004 discovery of a 113th element, paving the way for it to be named and included on the periodic table. (Mainichi Shimbun) (Nature##)
Sports
  • The NFL and the NFL Referees Association reach an agreement, ending the referee lockout that has been ongoing since June of this year. (CNN) (AP via Boston Globe)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
Health
International relations
  • Nigeria suspends flights to Saudi Arabia after hundreds of Nigerian women attending the Hajj pilgrimage in Mecca were deported for not traveling with a male escort. (Al Jazeera) (BBC)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
Law and crime
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • At least four Buddhist temples and fifteen homes are burnt by hundreds of Muslims in Bangladesh, angry about a picture allegedly posted on Facebook by a Buddhist man that had allegedly insulted Islam. (Times of India) (BBC)
  • Two opposition politicians and a supporter are shot dead at an opposition rally in Barinas state, Venezuela, a week before the country's presidential election. (Al Jazeera)
  • Syrian Civil War: An Islamist group fighting Syrian government troops says it has captured five soldiers from Yemen, whom it alleges were sent to quell the uprising. (Straits Times)
  • Car bomb blasts kill at least 32 people across Iraq. (Reuters) (BBC)
  • American and Afghan officials announce five people died on Saturday in a clash involving American and Afghan army troops at a checkpoint in Maidan Wardak Province, Afghanistan. The circumstances are unclear. (New York Times)
  • In Kenya, a nine-year-old boy is killed and other children are wounded in a grenade attack on a church in Nairobi. Hours later, two policeman are shot dead in Garissa. Police suspect al Shabaab sympathizers for the attacks. (Reuters)
Arts and culture
  • Singer George Michael cancels the Australian leg of his tour due to "major anxiety", resulting from his recovery from life-threatening pneumonia last November. (BBC)
Business and economy
Politics and elections
  • Bo Guagua, the son of disgraced Chinese politician Bo Xilai, defends his father in his first comments on the political scandal. (Radio Television Hong Kong)
Sport
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References

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