Portal:Current events/October 2012

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2012
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October 2012 was the tenth month of that leap year. The month, which began on a Monday, ended on a Wednesday after 31 days.

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from October 2012.

Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
Law and crime
  • A court in Bahrain upholds the jail sentences of nine medics convicted for their role in the country's uprising. (Reuters)
  • The appeal hearing in the Russian band Pussy Riot's case is delayed after one member of the group fired their lawyer. (RIA Novosti)
  • Chinese authorities close down the firm handling dissident artist Ai Weiwei's affairs, possibly saving him from paying the remainder of a 15 million yuan tax fine. (The Guardian)
  • California becomes the first U.S. state to forbid "conversion therapy" for minors, effective January 1st, 2013. (Fox News)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
Health and environment
Law and crime
  • A U.S. Border Patrol agent is shot dead near the U.S.-Mexico border in the state of Arizona. A second agent was shot and is being treated for non-life threatening injuries. (BBC)
  • Several sources claim that a French spy killed Muammar Gaddafi in 2011; the motive to try to conceal Ghadaffi's financial support of Nicolas Sarkozy's 2007 presidential election campaign. A French source dismisses the story as "nonsense". (Hindustan Times) (France 24)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
International relations
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Transport
  • The decision to award the rail franchise for the United Kingdom's West Coast Main Line to FirstGroup is scrapped by the government after what are described as "significant technical flaws" in the bidding process.(BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
Politics and elections
Science
  • GCHQ director Iain Lobban gives a rare public speech in which he speaks of the "enduring lessons" to be drawn from the work of Alan Turing, who reportedly committed suicide. (BBC)
Sport
  • The 2013 Championship draw is made at GAA headquarters in Croke Park. (The Irish Times)
  • The German Formula 1 driver Michael Schumacher announces his retirement from the sport. (BBC Sport)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • Anglo Platinum Limited—the world's biggest platinum producer—fires 12,000 people in South Africa after a strike over working conditions. The corporation has stated that the strikes have cost it 39,000 ounces in output - equivalent to 700 million rand ($82.3 million; £51 million) in revenue. (BBC)
Health and environment
  • At least 47 people throughout the United States are infected with fungal meningitis from contaminated medicine, with five people dying. (CNN)
Law and crime
  • The British High Court rules that Islamist cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri and four other suspected terrorists can be immediately extradited to the United States to face trial on charges of terrorism. (BBC) (CNN)
  • A torture case related to the 1950s Mau Mau uprising is allowed to proceed in a British court. (BBC)
  • Los Angeles Police Department fails to obtain a search warrant when a federal judge in Texas blocks their attempt to obtain 1970's tapes of conversations between a Manson family member and his attorney. LA Police believe this evidence could help solve more than a dozen murders.(FoxNews)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Law and crime
  • A court in the Vatican finds Pope Benedict XVI's former butler Paolo Gabriele guilty of theft for stealing and leaking confidential documents and sentences Gabriele to 18 months' imprisonment. (BBC)
  • A 46-year-old man is charged with the murder of April Jones, who disappeared near her home in Machynlleth, Wales, on October 1. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
Life and death
  • Antisa Khvichava, a woman regarded as the oldest person of all time, dies. (Radio Free Europe)
Politics and elections
Religion and spirituality
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Mexican Drug War: Initial reports from the Mexican Navy indicate that Heriberto Lazcano Lazcano, the top leader of the most dangerous Mexican criminal organization known as Los Zetas, may have been killed in a shootout. The forensic tests are currently on their way to confirm his identity. (USA Today)
Business and Finance
Health
  • Scientists warn of the dangers of using liquid nitrogen in drinks after a teenage girl from the United Kingdom required emergency surgery upon consuming a cocktail containing the substance. (The Telegraph)
Law and crime
  • Partial replacement of members of the European Court of Justice takes place in Luxembourg. (Court of Justice)
  • Police in Nigeria arrest 13 people in connection with the lynching of four university students who were accused of stealing laptops and mobile phones in Rivers state. (BBC)
  • Thirty five people are killed after the Nigerian military opened fire after a bomb struck their convoy in Maiduguri; both civilians and military personnel are believed to be among the dead after the suspected Boko Haram attack. (Reuters)
Politics and elections
Science
Society
Armed conflicts and attacks
International relations
Law and crime
  • Penn State child sex abuse scandal:
    • An audio recording of Jerry Sandusky is released in which he "wonders what they've won". (AP via Boston Globe)
    • After the court's declaration that Sandusky is a violent sexual predator, the presiding judge sentences him to at least 30 years imprisonment. During sentencing, the judge acknowledges Sandusky's "positive work" but further states that it served only to hide his true character. Sandusky's lawyer vows to lodge an appeal against the ruling. (The Patriot News) (CNN)
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Syrian civil war: Rebels claim control of the strategic town of Maarrat al-Nu'man on the main road linking Damascus to Aleppo. (Al Jazeera)
  • A Syrian passenger plane is forced by Turkish fighter jets to land in Ankara due to the allegations of carrying weapons. (BBC)
Business and economy
  • BAE and EADS announce their merger talks are cancelled over political disagreements. (New York Times)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Religion and spirituality
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • Oil giant Shell is sued by Niger Delta farmers in a civil court in The Hague, claiming oil spills ruined their livelihoods. Shell says it is difficult to carry out repairs because of local insecurity. (BBC)
Disasters
  • Heavy rain in the United Kingdom causes flash flooding in the coastal village of Clovelly, Devon, damaging homes and pulling up cobbles in the street. (BBC)
Health
  • The Marie Stopes organisation is to open the first private clinic to offer abortions to women in Northern Ireland from 18 October. (BBC) (RTÉ)
  • Seven prisoners from Amasya Prison in Turkey say that they began "indefinite and irreversible" hunger strikes on October 5, and their health is at serious risk. (Dicle Haber)
International relations
Law and Crime
Literature
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • Standard & Poor's downgrades South Africa's long-term foreign currency sovereign credit rating from 'BBB+' to 'BBB' and the long-term local currency rating from 'A' to 'A-'. (RIA Novosti)
International relations
  • The European Union wins the 2012 [[Nobel Peace Prize]; "for over six decades [having] contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe". (The Telegraph)
Law and crime
  • The British government is dragged into the nationwide scandal surrounding former BBC presenter and DJ Jimmy Savile, who faces hundreds of allegations surrounding his conduct in the presence of teenage girls. (The Guardian)
  • The UK's largest independent investigation into police wrongdoing will be conducted following a damning report into the 1989 Hillsborough disaster. (BBC)
  • The high court of Botswana overturns a customary law which prevented women from inheriting the family home. (IRIN)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Gerhard Richter's Abstraktes Bild, painted in 1994 and formerly owned by rock star Eric Clapton, sells for $34 million - an auction record for a work by a living artist. (BBC)
Business and economy
History
  • Residents of Los Angeles watch in awe as U.S. Space Shuttle Endeavour inches through the city on a giant trolley, bound for a museum. Hundreds of trees in its path are chopped down. (BBC)
International relations
  • Syria announces Turkish civilian flights over Syrian territory are banned, days after Turkey intercepted a Syrian flight that was suspected to be carrying illegal cargo. (BBC)
Law and crime
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Law and crime
Politics
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Syrian civil war: An Armenian plane destined for the Syrian city of Aleppo is searched by Turkish authorities after being grounded in the east of the country. (National Turk)
  • Internationally celebrated teenage activist Malala Yousafzai is sent to the UK for further treatment after being shot in the head by a Taliban gunman. (Reuters)
  • Gunmen kidnap five aid workers and their driver in southeastern Niger. (AP via Google News)
  • The Philippine government and the largest rebel group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front, sign a peace pact. (Al Jazeera)
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • The Portuguese government announces details of its draft budget for 2013, as protests continue against austerity. (BBC)
Disasters and accidents
  • Seven people are treated in hospital for injuries after a bus carrying 56 college students crashes and overturns near the English coastal town of Poole. (BBC)
International relations
Politics and elections
Transport
  • Virgin Trains is asked to continue running the rail franchise for UK's West Coast Main Line following the cancellation of a deal to award the contract to another company when errors were made in the way in which the process was conducted. (BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Senkaku Islands dispute: Seven People's Liberation Army Navy warships are spotted by Japanese helicopters outside Japanese territorial waters near Yonaguni. (Japan Daily Press)
  • Saudi Arabia’s official news agency reports that a hand grenade explosion at the King Abdulaziz military academy in Riyadh kills one cadet and injures nine. (AP via Boston Globe)
  • Several structures were set ablaze and as many as 24 militants were killed after suspected bombing Boko Haram attacks rocked the Nigerian city of Maiduguri. (BBC)
  • Two suspected al-Qaeda members and two government-aligned tribesmen are killed during an attack on a border checkpoint in Abyan, Yemen. (Reuters)
  • A United Nations expert panel reports that although the two governments deny it, Rwanda and Uganda continue to support the March 23 Movement. (Reuters)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Human rights
International relations
Law and crime
Disasters and accidents
  • A 4.0-magnitude (originally, 4.6) earthquake strikes Hollis Center, Maine, roughly 20 miles west of Portland, Maine, the state's largest city. At 3.1 miles deep, it is a shallow earthquake, felt in Maine, southwestern Connecticut, and eastern New York state. There were reports of very minor damage and cellular phone outages, but no serious property damage, injuries, or deaths. (NBC)
Politics and elections
Religion and diplomacy
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Law and crime
Politics and Elections
Science and Technology
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • American weekly news magazine Newsweek announces it will cease print publication on December 31 and will move to an online-only format. (CNN)
  • Trading of Google stock on NASDAQ is temporarily suspended after it drops 9% following an inadvertent early release of its quarterly report showing a 20% decline in profits. (BBC) (Bloomberg)
Politics and elections
Law and Crime
  • The Boy Scouts of America release documents containing over 15,000 pages relating to allegations of sexual abuse by over 1200 scout leaders between 1965-1985.(New York Times)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
  • A tour bus went off the highway and crashed in northwest Arizona late Friday at around 8:00 PM PDT, killing the bus driver (who was believed to have suffered a medical incident), and leaving at least four of the passengers with serious injuries. About 45 other passengers were hurt less seriously, and some were not hospitalized. The bus was northbound on Highway 93 near Willow Beach, Arizona and the Nevada state line, southeast of Las Vegas. (NBC)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • Respect MP George Galloway writes to British home secretary Theresa May and makes a complaint to the police about his secretary Aisha Ali-Khan, claiming that she was working as an "agent" for a Metropolitan police counterterrorism officer who was running a "dirty tricks" campaign against him. (The Guardian)
  • Chief Whip of the British Conservative Party Andrew Mitchell resigns over remarks he made to police officers in Downing Street, and following a lengthy political row over the issue. (BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
International relations
  • The SV Estelle', a schooner attempting to breach the Israeli blockade of Gaza claiming to deliver humanitarian aid, is boarded by Israeli soldiers and diverted to the port of Ashdod by Israeli naval ships; Israel says no aid is found aboard. Passengers offer no resistance. (The Irish Times) (The Times of Israel)
  • Jewish-American linguist, philosopher and human rights campaigner Noam Chomsky visits Gaza for the first time and attends a seminar alongside Gazan thinkers and intellectuals. (Press TV)
Politics
  • Tens of thousands of protesters march through London, Glasgow and Belfast in a series of demonstrations against UK government austerity measures. (BBC) (CNN) (RTÉ)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2012 Beirut bombing: Lebanese security forces fire shots into the air and tear gas at crowds, as protesters attempt to breach government offices of prime minister Mikati in response to a car bomb that killed intelligence chief Wissam al-Hassan. (Jerusalem Post)
  • Hundreds of protesters in Libya storm the grounds of the country's parliament building to protest the ongoing siege in Bani Walid. (Reuters)
  • Police fire tear gas and stun grenades at an anti-government protest in Kuwait; protesters were demonstrating against changes to voting laws. (Al Jazeera)
  • A firefight in Guinea-Bissau kills six people. (BBC)
  • Syrian civil war: Car bombs explode in predominately Christian neighborhoods in Damascus and Aleppo, killing at least 13, as talks between the Assad and U.N. peace envoy Lakhdar Brahimi continue. (Wall Street Journal)
Arts and culture
Religion and diplomacy
Law and crime
  • A shooting at a spa in Brookfield, Wisconsin, USA, leaves four people dead, including the shooter. (BBC) (NBC)
  • Sharmeka Moffitt, 20, a female from Winnsboro, Louisiana, sustains burns to over 60% of her body in what was initially believed to be a possible hate crime after she had claimed, through relatives, to have been set afire by three unknown at large male hoodie-wearing assailants in Winnsboro's Civitan Park. It turned out she is believed by police to have set herself on fire and to have written the slur on her car (she has since opened her eyes and blinked to communicate with relatives at Louisiana State University Hospital Shreveport, where she underwent surgery). (Shreveport Times) (MSN) (MSN)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • The Israeli air force strikes a rocket launching squad in the northern Gaza Strip, reportedly killing three, following rocket fire on southern Israel from Gaza and a mortar attack on an IDF patrol near the border. (Al Jazeera) (The Times of Israel)
  • Riot police in Kuwait attack demonstrators with teargas, stun grenades and batons. (Al Jazeera)
  • Syrian civil war: A Jordanian soldier dies during a gunfight between Jordanian troops and Islamic militants attempting to cross the border into Syria. (CTV News)
  • 2011–2012 conflict in Lebanon: The Lebanese Army launches an operation to quell the sectarian violence in Beirut triggered by the assassination of Wissam al-Hassan. (Voice of America)
  • Police authorities in South Africa admit the shooting of 34 miners by police "may have been disproportionate" to the danger faced by those in charge. (Al Jazeera)
Arts and culture
  • A Kindle user from Norway has her account wiped and all her paid-for books deleted by the American multinational electronic commerce company Amazon.com. (The Guardian)
Business and economics
  • A former Goldman Sachs employee blows the whistle on the investment bank having routinely taken advantage of charities and pension funds to increase its profits. (The Guardian)
  • The chairman of the U.S. central bank, the Federal Reserve, likely will not stand for re-election to that post. Ben Bernanke has reportedly told friends he will leave when his term ends in January 2014 regardless of who wins the Presidential election campaign. (New York Times)
International relations
  • The UK doubles its number of RAF armed "drones" operating in Afghanistan and, in a new development, drones are to be controlled from terminals and screens on British soil. (The Guardian)
  • France plans to use drones in Mali. (The Guardian)
Law and crime
  • Six Italian scientists and an ex-government official are convicted of multiple manslaughter and sentenced to six years in prison over the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake after prosecutors accuse them of being "falsely reassuring" before the event. (BBC) (The Guardian) (Al Jazeera)
  • Pussy Riot members Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova are exiled to remote prison camps located in Perm and Mordovia, home to parts of the Soviet-era gulag system. Their exact locations are unknown, even to their lawyers and family members. They had petitioned to be held in Moscow which would have allowed them to watch their young children grow. (The Guardian)
  • Peter Rippon, the BBC Newsnight editor responsible for dropping an investigation into allegations of sexual abuse against Jimmy Savile, steps aside from his role with immediate effect. (The Independent) (BBC)
  • The body of a female found late Monday in a recycling container in Clayton, New Jersey is preliminarily determined to be that of missing 12-year-old girl Autumn Pasquale according to police (NBC)
Politics and elections
  • Okinawa's legislative assembly passes a resolution expressing "overwhelming indignation" at the alleged rape of a Japanese woman by two U.S. soldiers, the latest of 5,747 crimes on record allegedly involving U.S. personnel over the past 40 years, and condemns the worsening criminal activity of foreign troops on the island. (Al Jazeera)
Sport
  • U.S. former professional road racing cyclist Lance Armstrong is stripped by the International Cycling Union of his seven Tour de France titles and banned for life from participating in UCI-sanctioned events. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • A football fan is jailed after an attack on former England international goalkeeper Chris Kirkland during a match last week. Twenty-one-year-old Aaron Cawley was filmed on live television jumping from the stand and striking Kirkland with both arms on the head following a goal during the league match at Hillsborough. Kirkland, who described the assault as like being "hit by a ton of bricks", was thrown off balance, crashed to the ground against his goal area and required treatment for his injuries. (The Guardian) (The Daily Telegraph)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • At least one person is killed and two others are wounded in an Israeli artillery attack in the northern Gaza Strip. (Al Jazeera)
  • Iraqi insurgency: At least eight people are killed in car bombings and mortar attacks across various districts in Baghdad, Iraq. (BBC)
  • A young Pakistani man, whose father was killed by drones alongside 40 others in March 2011, seeks to block the sharing of British intelligence with the CIA. This represents the first serious legal challenge in the English courts to Britain's involvement in the drones campaign. (The Guardian)
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters
  • A fire at a hospital in the southern Taiwanese city of Tainan kills at least 12 people and injures up to 60 others. (BBC)
  • A "very loud explosion" and a "huge fire" at a military factory in Khartoum are being treated as suspicious. (BBC)
  • Following yesterday's conviction of scientists for their failure to predict the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake, Luciano Maiani—head of Italy's disaster body—resigns in protest at the harsh treatment of his colleagues. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • A surfer is killed in southern California following an attack by a great white shark. (BBC) (CNN)
Innovation and technology
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Siege of Bani Walid (2012): Militias loyal to the Libyan government capture the town of Bani Walid after days of battle, with locals claiming that 130 civilians have died under artillery shelling attacks from militia forces. (The Daily Beast) (Reuters)
  • Israel targets rocket launching sites in Gaza in response to over 80 rockets being fired into Israeli territory by militants, causing deaths and injuries. (BBC) (The Times of Israel)
  • Sudan blames the explosion at a munition factory south of Khartoum on an Israeli airstrike. (Al Jazeera)
  • Syrian civil war: The UN peace envoy Lakhdar Brahimi states in Cairo that the Syrian government has agreed to a ceasefire during the four-day Muslim holiday, Eid al-Adha. (The Telegraph)
  • A journalist based in Somaliland is killed by gunmen while returning home from work. (BBC)
Innovation and technology
International relations
  • After years of delays and disputes over cost and design, and amid references in newspapers to Germany's rejection of asylum applications by Roma from Kosovo and comments from the country's interior minister alleging "increasing abuse of asylum from countries in the Balkans", Angela Merkel unveils a memorial near the Reichstag to members of the Roma community killed during the Nazi Holocaust. (BBC)
Law and crime
Politics
Religion and diplomacy
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Syrian civil war: The Syrian government announces via its state media that it will suspend military operations from Friday to Monday, during this year's Muslim Eid al-Adha holiday, as part of a ceasefire proposal by U.N. special envoy Lakhdar Brahimi. (CNN)
Business and economics
  • Official GDP figures indicate the 2012 Summer Olympics helped the UK economy emerge from recession in the three months from July to September, with growth of 1.0%. (BBC)
  • Costa Coffee—the world's second-largest coffeehouse chain—pulls out of Totnes, the Devon town that prides itself on having independent shops. (BBC) (ITV) (The Huffington Post)
Disasters
Law and crime
  • A rape claim against a major Irish celebrity is investigated. The victim was made pregnant during her ordeal. (Irish Independent)
  • A jury fails to reach a verdict in the retrial of a policeman thought to have racially abused a suspect in the aftermath of the 2011 England riots. (BBC)
  • Scotland Yard says that the number of potential victims in the Jimmy Savile sexual abuse scandal has risen to 300. (The Daily Telegraph) (The Guardian)
  • A New York Police Department officer, 6-year employee Gilberto Valle III along with an unnamed co-conspirator, is charged with allegedly conspiring to cross state lines and kidnap, torture, cook, and eat women (at least 100 names and pictures, some with physical descriptions, were found on his computer). He could get up to life in prison. (MSN)
Politics and elections
Religion and diplomacy
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Writer Javier Marías rejects the Spanish government's National Novel Prize, awarded for his novel Los enamoramientos, saying "All my life I have managed to avoid state institutions, regardless of which party was in government, and I have turned down all income from the public purse. I don't want to be seen as an author who is favoured by any particular government." (The Guardian)
Law and crime
  • China blocks the website of the New York Times and searches on social media after it published an investigation into the finances of Premier Wen Jiabao. (Al Jazeera)(New York Times)
  • Russian leftist protest leader Sergei Udaltsov is charged with plotting "mass disorder" and could face a 10 year prison sentence if convicted. (RIA Novosti)
  • Former Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi is sentenced to four years imprisonment for fiscal fraud. (AGI)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Iraqi insurgency: A series of attacks across Iraq kill 46 and injured 123 others. (BBC)
  • Several injuries occur as police use rubber-coated steel bullets and tear gas to disperse people at the Olympia Stadium in Rustenburg, South Africa. (Al Jazeera)
Business and economics
  • Thousands of people join protests against budget cuts in Madrid and ask that the government quit. Riot police greet the demonstrators. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
  • Jimmy Savile sexual abuse scandal:
    • The family of disgraced disc jockey and television presenter Jimmy Savile makes its first public statement since his reputation was destroyed by a sexual abuse scandal. (CNN) (BBC)
    • A statement from the Vatican claims it is not possible to strip Savile of his papal knighthood over his involvement in the sexual abuse scandal because the honour ceased to exist upon his death. Vatican spokesman Federico Lombardi makes it known that the Vatican is "deeply saddened that a person who has been stained by such acts could in his lifetime have been proposed for an honour by the Holy See." (The Irish Times)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
Exploration
Law and crime
Sport
Deaths
  • Jose Isaac Guardado
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Syrian civil war:
    • Two deadly car bombings rock Damascus, according to Syrian state media. (BBC)
  • Bahraini uprising: Anti-government protests are banned and legal action is threatened against those backing the protests. (Al Jazeera)
  • Police attack thousands of demonstrators with tear gas and water cannons in Ankara during the celebrations of the anniversary of the foundation of the Republic of Turkey. (Al Jazeera)
Business and economics
  • Penguin and Random House agree to merge to form Penguin Random House, the world's largest publisher. (The Guardian) (BBC)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
  • Human Rights Watch and other rights groups issue a report rejecting the Israeli government’s arguments against accepting Africans migrants seeking asylum in Israel and criticizing it for using force to deter them from entering the country, stating that the migrants face extreme violence if denied entry into Israel. (Al Jazeera) (The Jerusalem Post)
  • Activists descend on the city of Paju to float 50,000 propaganda leaflets on balloons into North Korea, despite protests from local South Korean residents concerned at provoking a military response. (BBC)
Law and crime
  • Damian Rzeszowski is sentenced to 30 years in prison for killing six people—including his wife and children—in Jersey. (BBC)
  • The U.S. Supreme Court declines to take on the review of an abortion-related appeal. The case, which is a proposed measure to amend the Oklahoma state constitution that was unanimously struck down by the Oklahoma Supreme Court, dealt with the constitutionality of state "personhood" laws that endorse the viewpoint that human life begins at conception, and would give human embryos rights and privileges given to citizens, which could have made it more difficult to have abortions for non-emergency reasons. (CNN)
  • Registered child sex offenders in Simi Valley, California, will not have to post a sign outside their home this Halloween reading in part "no candy," but they still are prohibited from decorating their houses and handing out candy, U.S. District Judge Percy Anderson ruled Tuesday, in a partial victory for the suing offenders and their wives before Halloween. (CNN)
Politics and elections
  • Fernando Haddad is elected mayor of São Paulo, giving the governing Workers' Party control of Brazil's financial capital and biggest city. (BBC) (Los Angeles Times)
  • A shortlist of successors to the Coptic Pope is drawn up; a blindfolded child is then expected to pick from a list of three. (BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Syrian civil war:
    • Qatar says the government of Syria is waging a "war of extermination" against their own citizens. (Al Jazeera)
    • At least 50 are killed throughout the country, according to an activist group. (CNN)
  • The Bahraini regime makes all opposition to its rule illegal. (Al Jazeera) (BBC)
  • Police attack Anglo American Platinum mine workers with rubber bullets, tear gas and stun grenades in Rustenburg, South Africa. (Al Jazeera)
  • Bolivian journalist Fernando Vidal is set on fire live on radio. (BBC)
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters
Law and crime
  • Rwanda’s high court sentences opposition leader, Victoire Ingabire, to eight years in prison, convicting her of "conspiring to harm the country through war and terror, and minimizing" the 1994 genocide in Rwanda. (The New York Times)
  • Organisers of a proposed free public event on Homo floresiensis are forced to change the event's title after use of the word "hobbit", the creature's nickname, is forbidden by the representatives of the Tolkien Estate. (The Guardian)
  • A suburban Chicago woman, Elzbieta Plackowska, 40, of Naperville, Illinois, is held without bail after allegedly fatally stabbing her 7-year-old son, Justin, Tuesday night 100 times, and then killing a 5-year-old girl, Olivia Dworakowski, who she had been babysitting and who had witnessed the homicide. She told investigators she did it because she was angry with her husband, a truck driver who was often away, leaving her to do work as a maid and care for the child, work that supposedly was beneath her, according to DuPage County, Illinois State's Attorney Robert Berlin. (Peoria Journal Star)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • The New York Stock Exchange reopens following a two-day closure due to Hurricane Sandy, with stocks trending lower. (CNN Money) (Reuters)
  • Barclays plc says that it is the subject of two new regulatory probes after a series of scandals. The bank also announces it made a loss in the third quarter of 2012. (BBC)
Disasters
  • In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, the death toll rises to over 60 in the Mid-Atlantic states of the United States, while electric power for millions is still out, and mass transportation is crippled. (The Vancouver Sun) (CNN)
  • Five thousand people are evacuated from low-lying areas off the coast of Tamil Nadu state in India and two sailors die in heavy seas before Cyclone Nilam hits the coast. (CNN) (The Times of India)
  • An electrical fire at a Saudi wedding kills 25 people in a courtyard of a home in the village of Al Badr in the Abqaiq region. (BBC)
Law and crime
International relations
Politics
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References

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