Portal:Current events/November 2015

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
2015
January
February
March
April
May
June
July
August
September
October
November
December

November 2015 was the eleventh month of that common year. The month, which began on a Sunday, ended on a Monday after 30 days.

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from November 2015.

Armed conflicts and attacks
  • War in Somalia (2009–present)
    • Islamist al-Shabaab militants attack a hotel in Mogadishu resulting in at least 12 deaths. (AFP via Yahoo! News) (Reuters via ABC News Australia)
  • Syrian Civil War
    • Islamic State fighters seize control of Mahin, a town in Syria's central Homs province, following clashes with government forces which left about 50 dead. Fighting was also reported to be taking place on the outskirts of Sadad, a nearby town mostly populated by Christians. (Reuters)
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict (2015)
    • One Palestinian is killed and three Israeli soldiers injured in two attacks in the West Bank. According to the Israeli army, the Palestinian was shot dead after attempting to stab soldiers at a military checkpoint near the Beit Einun village in Hebron. In a second incident in the same area, a driver rammed and injured three Israeli paramilitary border policemen with his car before fleeing the scene. None of the three were injured seriously. (The Daily Star) (Al Jazeera)
    • Since the beginning of October, nine Israeli citizens, 67 Palestinian and an Arab Israeli have been killed in this wave of violence. (AFP via Yahoo News)
    • The fate of slain Palestinians is fueling a new feud with Israeli authorities. The Israeli defense minister says Israel is refusing to return the bodies of Palestinian terrorists killed during this month-old surge of violence unless the Palestinian side agrees to keep their funerals "modest." (Reuters)
    • An Israel Defense Forces inquiry concludes the death of a Palestinian woman at a checkpoint in Hebron last month was unnecessary, finding the teenager could have been detained and not killed. (Haaretz)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Science and technology
  • French national public television broadcaster France Télévisions fires France 2 TV channel's weatherman Philippe Verdier, who has been suspended since mid-October. Verdier, known as “Monsieur Météo” (Mr Weather), has been promoting his recently published book, Climat Investigation (Climate Investigation), in which he throws doubt on the global warning findings of leading climate scientists and political leaders. France Télévisions said its rules, "prevent anyone using their professional status … to push forward their personal opinions." (Irish Times) (The Guardian)
Sports
Politics and election
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
  • At least seven people are dead and 35 others are injured as a bus overturns near Tula, Russia. (RT)
  • At least 30 people are killed and 35 injured after an overcrowded bus carrying passengers inside and on its roof veered off a mountain road in northwest Nepal. (USA Today)
  • 2015 Southeast Asian haze
  • 2015 North Indian Ocean cyclone season
    • Cyclone Chapala
      • "Ravaged by months of war, Yemen now gets battered by the first tropical storm on record to make landfall." Extremely Severe Cyclonic Storm Chapala slams into Yemen's central coast, with maximum sustained winds of around 140 kph (85 mph) -- the equivalent of a Category 1 hurricane. The storm floods coastal areas, brings down electricity lines and destroys houses, with severe threat of mudslides. Chapala is expected to pour over two or three years worth of rain, up to 300 millimeters (12 inches), in a single day. (CNN) (Abu Dhabi Media)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Kogalymavia Flight 9268
  • Kunduz hospital airstrike, Afghanistan War
    • The United States says that last month's airstrikes in Kunduz hit three locations, mistakenly including the Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders) (MSF) hospital where at least 30 were killed. Afghan commanders, whose forces were actively engaged with the Taliban, requested the attacks. The Washington Post reports a warehouse and a mansion in two densely populated residential areas were "pulverized" without loss of civilian lives. According to residents, earlier their neighborhoods had been conflict zones, but no militants were there the time of the attacks. "Together, the three attacks raise questions about the quality and reliability of the intelligence that Afghan security forces are providing to their American partners, as well as U.S. decisions to act on that intelligence," writes the Post. (Washington Post)
    • Médecins Sans Frontières held memorials around the globe Tuesday, the one month anniversary of the bombing, to reaffirm their request for an independent investigation. U.S. officials resist an independent probe, pledging that the three investigations underway, by the Pentagon, NATO, and Afghan officials, will be thorough and transparent. Thomas Nierle, head of MSF Switzerland, told AFP that he had little hope the inquiries would ultimately see any wrongdoers punished. (The Hill) (DW Akademie) (AFP via Yahoo News)
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • University of California, Merced stabbing attack
    • Police, at the University of California, Merced campus, shoot and kill a male student who went on a stabbing rampage that wounded four people. The University closed its campus, except for housing, and cancelled classes for Wednesday and Thursday. The school reported all of the wounded are expected to recover. (KGO) (UC Merced) (Los Angeles Times) (AP via Houston Chronicle)
  • Police have the gunman in custody and San Diego International Airport flights resume. The airport closed after police encountered a man with a gun shooting in a Bankers Hill apartment complex, east of the approach path to the airport. Also known as Lindbergh Field, the airport is frequently cited as one of the scariest because of its downtown location. (AP update) (Reuters) (Airfare Watchdog)
  • The Mexican Supreme Court, in a 4-1 decision, rules that people have the right to grow and distribute marijuana for their personal use. The decision challenges the country’s current substance abuse laws. Fox News Latino and The New York Times point out the ruling only covers the plaintiffs in one case, a group that wants to form a "Pot Club." A precedent will be established if the court approves five similar petitions. (Fox News Latino) (Reuters)
  • James Tran of Sacramento County is arrested on suspicion of attempted homicide in the October 8 stabbing of Airman Spencer Stone near a bar in Sacramento California. Stone had helped foil the 2015 Thalys train attack but officials believe it was just a drunken bar fight. (MSN)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Art and culture
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
  • Kogalymavia Flight 9268
    • Russia has ordered the suspension of all flights to Egypt following indications that the crash near Sharm el-Sheikh was caused by a bomb.(BBC)
  • Minas Gerais dam disaster
    • Thursday's flooding and devastating mudslides at the BHP-Vale mine in Minas Gerais involved two dams, not one as initially reported. Brazilian officials report the mud flow is eight kilometers (five miles) long and 2.5 meters deep. Those rescued – and emergency services – are being decontaminated; mining spoils being treated as toxic. There is no official information on the number of casualties or the cause of the incident. The company that runs the mine says it detected seismic activity right before the breach. Both BHP and Vale shares declined over five percent. Brazilian prosecutors have opened a criminal investigation. (Mashable) (Bloomberg) (CCTV)
Health and medicine
International relations
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Art and culture
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
  • A manhunt is underway for a gunman who shot and seriously wounded presiding Travis County, Texas State District Judge Julie Kocurek at the driveway of her home in West Austin, Texas. It was unclear whether she and/or her family members were targeted (they were arriving home) or if it was a botched robbery. She was listed in serious condition at University Medical Center Brackenridge in Austin but is expected to recover. (USA Today, via MSN)
  • In Louisiana, United States, two law enforcement officers are arrested and charged with homicide of a six-year-old and attempted homicide of his father. (Al Jazeera English) (BBC)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and Culture
Disasters and accidents
  • A Canadian Pacific Railway train carrying crude oil derails in Wisconsin; some of the 10 derailed cars are leaking oil. This is the second consecutive day for a freight train crash in the state. Yesterday, a BNSF Railway train wreck spilled thousands of gallons of ethanol. No injuries were reported in either accident. (AP via Houston Chronicle) (WBAY)
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Art and culture
Business and economy
  • The German airline Lufthansa suspends 929 flights leaving 113,000 passengers stranded as a result of a cabin crew strike. (AFP via Yahoo! finance)
Disasters and accidents
  • 2015 North Indian Ocean cyclone season
    • Cyclone Megh
      • Cyclone Megh had sustained winds of 204 km/h (127 mph), the equivalent of a Category 3 hurricane, when it hit the island of Socotra. According to AFP, Megh killed six, injured dozens with three reported missing and 5,000 people forced to leave their homes. (Reuters) (USA Today) (Al Jazeera) (AFP via Yahoo)
      • Megh is expected to cross the Yemen coast Tuesday at 9:00 a.m. Arabia Standard Time (6:00 a.m. UTC). In the Gulf of Aden, the storm has maximum sustained winds of 111 km/h (69 mph), gusting to 130 km/h (81 mph). Its strength will significantly erode once it makes landfall and continue to decay after it moves inland into the dry and rugged terrain of Western Yemen. It is not expected to track back over water. (United States Naval Observatory) (Regional Specialized Meteorological Center)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • Technology news website Re/code reports Dell Incorporated's $67 billion offer to buy data storage company EMC Corporation could be derailed by a tax bill of up to $9 billion if key aspects of the deal do not qualify for the sort of tax treatment the companies consider essential for the transaction. (Reuters) (Economic Times) (Re/code)
Disasters and accidents
  • All nine people aboard a Hawker H25 business jet are killed after the plane crashes into an apartment complex in the American city of Akron, Ohio. (Fox News) (WOIO via WNEW) [2] The NTSB in October 2016 concluded First Officer Renato Marchese improperly set the aircraft's flaps and failed to maintain a proper speed ABC News
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • Metrojet Flight 9268
    • Tourism bookings in Egypt’s main Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheikh plunge in the wake of the plane crash with some 80% of reservations cancelled and at least 40% of the tourists leaving the resort since the crash. (The Globe And Mail)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Mario Draghi, head of the European Central Bank, tells the European parliament in prepared testimony that the outlook for inflation is "weakening." The comment was taken to suggest the ECB will soon take a more stimulative stance on interest rates or money quantity. (Bloomberg)
  • The city of Montreal in Canada begins dumping 2 billion gallons of raw sewage into the Saint Lawrence River, an action the mayor, Denis Coderre, says is necessary to make repairs and improvements to the city's wastewater system. The move has caused outrage among residents and environmentalists, while the hashtag "#‎flushgate‬" is being used on social media sites to voice opposition to the dumping effort. (CNN)
International relations
Health and medicine
Law and crime
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Nasdaq is engaged in negotiations to buy the Canada unit of Chi-X Global Holdings. Chi-X is an important provider of alternative equity trading venues. (Reuters)
Disasters and accidents
  • The bodies of eight babies are found wrapped in towels and inside plastic bags in an apartment in the town of Wallenfels in Germany's state of Bavaria. Authorities are looking for the apartment's most recent occupant, Andrea G, a 45-year-old woman. (CNN) (Irish Times)
  • At least four people are dead and 33 injured in a landslide in China's Zhejiang province. (CRI)
International Relations
  • U.S. diplomats, amid growing international concern the violence could spiral into an ethnic conflict, push for peace talks in Burundi. The European Union advises non-essential staff to evacuate the Central African nation amid rising violence and an uptick in political rhetoric. The head of the opposition UPRONA group urges the United Nations to send peacekeepers quickly. Yesterday, the UN Security Council called on the Burundi Government to protect human rights and cooperate with regional African mediators to immediately convene “an inclusive and genuine inter-Burundian dialogue” to find a peaceful resolution of the crisis. (Al Jazeera) (Reuters) (UN)
  • European migrant crisis
    • German Chancellor Angela Merkel asserts she still isn't prepared to name an upper limit to the number of refugees who can come to Germany, despite mounting domestic political pressure. (AP)
    • Oxfam's Belgrade Center for Human Rights reports migrants coming through Bulgaria have faced beatings, threats and other abuses by police, though the country's own refugee agency said it had received no such complaints. (Reuters)
  • Syrian Civil War peace process
    • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets in Vienna, Austria, with the foreign ministers of Turkey and Saudi Arabia, as well as the U.N. special envoy for Syria, ahead of Saturday's next round of international summits on the Syrian Civil War. The talks, aimed toward a cease-fire in Syria's devastating war and a political transition to a post-war government, will include senior officials from 19 nations/groups and, as in October, Iran will participate. (AP)
  • Metrojet Flight 9268
    • As a temporary security measure, effective Saturday, Russia bans incoming flights by Egypt's state-owned airline, EgyptAir, two weeks after an apparent terrorist bomb downed a Russian jet in the Sinai. (Reuters)
Law and crime
  • Police in the Dominican Republic raid a mansion owned by 30-year-old Francisco Flores de Freites, one of the two nephews of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro facing charges for allegedly trying to traffic 800 kg of cocaine into the U.S., and found more than 280 pounds of cocaine and 22 pounds of heroin hidden inside the nephew’s posh Casa de Campo property and a 135-foot yacht named “The Kingdom” docked behind it. (Fox News)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • WT1190F, an artificial satellite orbiting the Earth since before June 2009, impacts the Earth south of Sri Lanka. (CBC)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • Scott N. Johansen, a Utah Juvenile Court judge, reverses his original order to remove a foster child from same sex-parents. The state Division of Child and Family Services and foster parents all filed motions asking for the reconsideration and promising an appeal. The new decision eliminates the phrase, "It is not in the best interest of children to be raised by same-sex couples" and strikes an order for the child to be placed with a non-same-sex couple. (New York Times)
  • Police in South Korea fire tear gas and water cannons at anti-government protesters in Seoul. Around 70,000 people took part in the protests, the largest in Seoul since the 2008 US beef protest in South Korea. (Christian Science Monitor).
Science and Technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • Daily fantasy sports companies DraftKings and FanDuel, who are fighting New York's cease-and-desist order that their industry is gambling in the U.S. state, apparently are OK with that label in the United Kingdom. DraftKings obtained a British gambling license in August and FanDuel applied for one earlier this month. (AP)
Disasters and accidents
  • The death toll from a landslide on Friday in China's Zhejiang province rises to 16 with 21 still missing. (New York Times)
  • Heavy rain leads to warnings of floods in mid and north Wales. (BBC)
International relations
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • Six people, including a child, have been found dead on private property in Anderson County, southeast of Dallas, Texas, USA. The victims are members of two different families. One person, unrelated to the victims, is charged with one count of murder. More charges are expected. (CBS DFW)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Art and culture
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • Sweden's terror threat level is raised to 'high' for the first time in history, as national security service Säpo says that police are hunting a suspected terrorist. (The Local)
  • Washington College, on the U.S. Delmarva Peninsula, closes until Sunday, November 30, as police search for an upset, potentially armed student who just returned to campus. His Pennsylvania high school is on alert. (WBAL), (The Washington Post), (NBC 10)
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
  • Kuwaiti authorities announce they arrested six members of an extremist network suspected of supplying funds and weapons, including rockets, to Daesh (Islamic State) militants. Four others are still being sought outside of the country. The group includes a Lebanese, an Egyptian, five Syrians, two Australians, and a Kuwaiti national. (Reuters) (Time) (The Gulf News)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Art and culture
Business and economy
International relations
Law and crime
  • Sweden's national security service Säpo are questioning terrorist suspect Moder Mothama Magid, a 22-year-old Iraqi, who is accused of planning to launch a terror attack on the Swedish capital Stockholm. (Local)
  • The family of Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, who saved tens of thousands of Jews from the Holocaust only to languish in a Russian prison, have asked authorities to officially declare him dead. (Times of Israel)
  • The United States releases on parole convicted Israeli spy Jonathan Pollard, a former U.S. intelligence analyst, who served 30 years in federal prison. His parole, approved on July 28, 2015, is for five years during which time he has to remain in the United States. A supporter said Pollard will have a curfew and will wear a GPS unit. (The Globe and Mail) (The Globe and Mail-2)
  • The U.S. Justice Department files criminal charges against three individuals and three companies--Black Elk, Grand Isle Shipyard and oil field services company Wood Group--in connection with a 2012 oil platform incident in the Gulf of Mexico that left three workers dead. The charges range from manslaughter to violations of the federal Clean Water Act. (UPI)
  • USPlabs and S.K. Laboratory are indicted following a U.S. Department of Justice investigation finds synthetic ingredients manufactured in China were added to workout boosters and weight-loss products the firms claimed to be natural. Supplements from these companies were previously implicated in consumer illnesses and death. Several other defendants from the companies face additional charges. (Military Times)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • NASA orders its first commercial crew mission from private company SpaceX. (The Verge)
  • A jury in a Texas federal court finds for Apple Inc., in a lawsuit brought against Apple by a subsidiary of Pendrell Corporation. Pendrell has charged that Apple infringed patents on techniques that help restrict the use of web content to authorized persons, i.e. anti-piracy software. (Reuters)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
  • A student, whose disappearance with a gun caused the precautionary closing of Washington College in Maryland (U.S.) this week, is found dead in Pennsylvania of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The campus will reopen after Thanksgiving. (Washington Post) (Washington College)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • A 14-year-old boy solves the Rubik's Cube in 4.90 seconds, beating the previous record of 5.25 seconds, and becoming the first person to solve it in under 5 seconds (The Guardian)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Maguindanao massacre
    • Human rights activists and families of the victims decry the lack of justice six years after the murder of around 58 people, including journalists and politicians, in Maguindanao, Mindanao. They criticize the regime of Philippines President Benigno Aquino III for the lack of convictions in the trial. (ABC News) (Voice of America) (Fox News)
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict (2015)
    • A Palestinian kills a 20 year-old Israeli and wounds two women in a stabbing attack at a gas station near the town of Modi’in; the Palestinian assailant is shot and killed by an officer at the scene. (Ynet News) (Times of Israel)
    • Two Palestinian teenage girls, ages 14 and 16, use scissors to stab a 70-year-old Palestinian man whom they misidentified as an Israeli, and other Israeli civilians, near Jerusalem’s Mahane Yehuda market; one of the attackers is killed and the other wounded while being subdued, and an Israeli civilian is wounded by police gunfire. (Times of Israel)
Business and economy
  • American pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and Allergan, Plc announce plans to merge to form the world's largest drug company. The merger is subject to approval from regulators in the U.S., European Union and elsewhere as well as approval by shareholders of both companies. If approved, the deal will reduce tax revenue paid to the U.S. by approximately $930 million. (Reuters via The Washington Post) (AP via Denver Post)
    • A Washington University in St. Louis (U.S.) international tax law expert says this deal is the biggest merger involving tax inversion, i.e., relocation of a corporation's legal domicile to a lower-tax nation, usually while retaining operations in its higher-tax country. "None of the special anti-inversion laws and regulations issued by the federal government will apply to Pfizer post-merger," Professor Adam Rosenzweig, JD, said. Rosenzweig believes this deal will encourage more U.S. companies to follow Pfizer's approach in future mergers. (Washington University)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • A new United Nations report finds 90 percent of the thousands of disasters over the last two decades are weather-related. The majority have been caused by floods, storms, heatwaves and droughts. Researchers with the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) suggest the cost has been between $250 and $350 billion per year, i.e., total of $5 trillion/$7 trillion. The report concurs with findings of previous studies that weather disasters are on the rise compared to previous decades. Flooding, in particular, is becoming more frequent and more devastating as sea levels continue to rise. (UPI)
  • Blue Origin launches the unmanned rocket New Shephard to the edge of space (100.5 km) and lands safely upright on its original launch pad in Texas, becoming the first organization to do so. (press release) (WSJ)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
  • A military court in Bangkok charges two men, Adem Karadag and Yusufu Miefaili, with offences related to the 2015 Bangkok bombing. (Al Jazeera)
  • A bomb blast at the Hellenic Business Federation offices in central Athens, Greece, damages the Cypriot Embassy across the street. While there is yet no claim for responsibility the authorities suspect a domestic guerrilla group set off the blast. (Reuters)
  • Shooting of Laquan McDonald
    • Chicago, Illinois police officer Jason Van Dyke is charged with first-degree murder for the October 2014 shooting death of Laquan McDonald, a 17-year-old boy armed with a 3-inch knife. The charge comes shortly before the release of the police video showing the shooting. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel meets with community leaders to discuss the video’s release and the potential ramifications for the city. (CNN)
  • 2015 Roubaix shootings
    • At least one person is killed after a group of armed men took people hostage in the northern French town of Roubaix near the Belgian border. The hostages are thought to be a bank director and his family. French police say the incident may be related to a robbery and not to the November 2015 attacks in Paris. (Irish Independent)
  • Recordings of JFK Assassination
  • Minneapolis, Minnesota (U.S.) police arrest three men suspected of involvement in Monday's shooting of five people, with non-life-threatening gunshot injuries, who had been protesting the recent police killing of Jamar Clark, a 24-year-old African-American man. Protesters, who had been told to watch out for white supremacists wearing masks or camouflage clothing, said that the shooting occurred after a group of people — three men and a woman, all wearing ski masks — were seen filming the protest. The two officers involved in Mr. Clark's shooting are on paid leave during the investigations, including one by the Justice Department's civil rights division. (Washington Post) (Washington Post update)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • Martin Shkreli's Turing Pharmaceuticals is reneging on its pledge to cut the $750-per-pill price for Daraprim, a medication that has been marketed for 62 years. Instead, the biotech company is reducing what it charges hospitals, by up to 50 percent, for this parasitic infection treatment. Imprimis Pharmaceuticals, a pharmacy that compounds prescription drugs for individual patients, started selling a custom-made version of Pyrimethamine, the chemical name for Daraprim, for 99 cents per capsule. Impris reports orders are pouring in from doctors. (AP via Washington Post)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • China's Shanghai index closed down 5.5%, a drop of almost 200 points in what was its largest single-day decline in three months. (New York Times)
  • Greek government-debt crisis
    • A new study shows Greece's six-year austerity program is even affecting prostitution. Gregory Laxos, a sociology professor at the Panteion University in Athens, told the Times of London the going rate for sex with a prostitute was 50 euros ($53) when the economic crisis began. Now, it’s fallen to as low as two euros ($2.12) for a 30-minute session, or to a cheese pie, a sandwich because they are hungry. (Washington Post)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
  • Detroit, a city in which property values are among the lowest in the United States, is looking to reverse this. The Detroit Land Bank Authority is demolishing structures that are beyond repair and auction (bids start at $1,000) ones that are salvageable. (Washington Post)
  • Chinese President Xi Jinping announced a major overhaul of China’s military to make the world’s largest army more combat ready and better equipped to project force beyond the country’s borders. Under the reorganization, all branches of the armed forces would come under a joint military command. The Chinese president said the reform aimed to "build an elite combat force" and called on the officials to make "breakthroughs" on establishing the joint command by 2020, Xinhua said. (Bloomberg)
  • Yu Weiguo becomes the acting Governor of Fujian province, replacing Su Shulin, who had been detained on suspicion of corruption. (SCMP)
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
  • A slow moving wintry storm system is responsible for more than a dozen deaths in the U.S. states of Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. (AP)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
  • A fire in the South African city of Cape Town leaves two people dead and four thousand people homeless. (The Times Live)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
  • One person dies and at least 31 are injured when students and staff at Strathmore University in Nairobi, Kenya, frantically try to escape after hearing nearby gunshots during an “approved safety and security simulation drill.” The Strathmore campus did not hear, before or during the test, that this was a drill. Tensions have been high at Kenyan schools since April when 139 were killed during a terrorist attack at Garissa University College. Many Kenyan universities have held security drills; six were hospitalized at the latest at Kenyatta University. (The Washington Post), (BBC)
Health and medicine
  • The capitals of the world’s two most populous nations, China and India, are blanketed in hazardous, choking smog. Beijing, on the second-highest pollution alert, is closing highways, halting or suspending construction while warning residents to stay indoors. The U.S. New Delhi embassy’s monitoring station recorded an air quality index of 372, putting air pollution levels into “hazardous” territory. No action by the New Delhi government. (The Hindustan Times)
  • A UNICEF report finds AIDS is now the leading cause of death for African teenagers and the second most common killer for adolescents across the globe. While the Asia Pacific region has seen a 31 percent drop in new HIV infections, and 28 percent decline in AIDS-related deaths, the estimated number of adolescents dying of AIDS in the region has more than doubled since 2005. Tomorrow is World Aids Day. (AP via The Huffington Post), (Reuters)
International relations
Law and crime
  • The University of Chicago cancels classes for the day, and asks students, faculty, and non-essential staff to stay away from its main campus after being informed by the FBI of a threat of gun violence. (Reuters via The Jerusalem Post), (USA Today)
    • One suspect, a student from the University of Illinois at Chicago is arrested. The University of Chicago announces classes remain canceled for the day. (The Chicago Tribune)
  • Russian undesirable organizations law
    • Russia bans two George Soros-run foundations, including the Open Society Foundations, for posing a threat to "Russian national security". The Open Society Foundation and the Open Society Institute’s Assistance Foundation, both financed by business magnate Soros, are the latest additions to a list of “undesirable organizations”, a list the Russian government says is necessary to stop foreign governments from interfering in Russia’s internal affairs. (The Guardian)
  • Jury selection begins for the trial of William Porter, a Baltimore, Maryland police officer charged with manslaughter and other charges surrounding the April 19 death of Freddie Gray. Porter is the first of six officers to be tried. (CNN)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
<< November 2015 >>
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30
 Ongoing events

Political

Sports

More details on ongoing conflicts below

edit sidebar

 Recent deaths

November

October

edit sidebar

 Ongoing conflicts

Africa

Americas

Asia

Europe

Middle East

edit sidebar

 Elections

Recent

Upcoming

edit sidebar

 Trials

Recently concluded

Ongoing

Upcoming

edit sidebar

References

  1. ^ "Gallagher wanted to be enlisted soldier". Chatham Daily News. Retrieved 24 November 2015. 
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Portal:Current_events/November_2015&oldid=730542201"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Current_events/November_2015
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Portal:Current events/November 2015"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA