Portal:Current events/June 2013

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2013
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June 2013 was the sixth month of that common year. The month, which began on a Saturday, ended on a Sunday after 30 days.

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from June 2013.

Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Two drone strikes kill at least seven suspected al-Qaeda militants in the Abyan Governorate of Yemen. (Reuters)
  • Iraqi insurgency (post-U.S. withdrawal)
    • Authorities in Iraq say they have uncovered an Al-Qaeda plot to use chemical weapons, as well as to smuggle them to Europe and North America. (BBC), (Sky new)
    • UN death-toll figures show more than 1000 people died from violent attacks in Iraq during the month of May, making it the country's deadliest month since 2008. (VOA)
  • Inmates kill two prison guards in a failed Nigerien jailbreak. (New York Times)
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
  • The death toll from the tornados that hit Oklahoma City on May 31 rises to nine. (News Limited)
  • Three people are killed in apartment building explosion in Manila, Philippines. (Sydney Morning Herald via AFP)
  • An Ontario, Canada air ambulance crashes killing its two pilots and two paramedics. (BBC)
International relations
Law and crime
  • Michael Adebolajo is formally charged with the murder of British Army soldier Lee Rigby in the 2013 Woolwich attack. (Sky News)
  • A country-wide smoking ban in most public spaces goes into effect in Russia. (Reuters)
  • Turtle conservationist Jairo Mora Sandoval is murdered by poachers on a Costa Rican beach. (Tico Times)
Sports
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
Politics
Science and technology
  • New research finds that graphene is the strongest material in the world, even when patched together. (Science Recorder)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2013 protests in Turkey:
    • Riot police fire tear gas at people in Istanbul and Ankara amid calls for the downfall of the current Turkish government. (Al Jazeera) (RT) (RFERL)
    • The Turkish Doctors' Union (TTB) says one person has been killed in Taksim Gezi Park. (Xinhua)
    • Turkey's public sector unions start a two-day strike in support of the anti-government demonstrations. (BBC)
  • Bahraini uprising (2011–present):
    • Three people who previously demonstrated against the regime are jailed for 5, 10 and 15 years respectively. (RT) (Gulf News)
  • War in Afghanistan (2001–present):
  • An unmarked mass grave containing around 200 bodies is found in the Israeli town of Jaffa. (Al Jazeera)
Arts and culture
  • Bollywood actress Jiah Khan dies of an apparent suicide at age 25. (India Today)
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
  • At least 119 people are killed in a fire at a poultry farm in Jilin Province in northeastern China. (Al Jazeera) (AP via Silicon Valley Mercury), (Xinhua)
  • 2013 European floods:
    • Flooding across Europe kills seven people and leaves others unaccounted for. (The Guardian) (Al Jazeera)
    • The Czech Republic experiences its worst flooding of the decade with huge volumes of water surging towards Prague. (BBC)
  • A Cebu Pacific flight carrying 165 passengers inbound from Manila, overshoots the runway during heavy rain in Davao City, Philippines. There are no fatalities, however the plane is heavily damaged. (ABS-CBN News)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
Health and environment
  • More than 150 scientists urge the Australian Government to slow development near the Great Barrier Reef. (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
International relations
  • A Swiss diplomat is arrested in Paris on drunk driving charges after leading police on a high speed chase through the city. (ABC News)
Law and crime
  • United States v. Bradley Manning:
  • Lawyers gather outside Britain's Ministry of Justice to demonstrate against £220 million of proposed legal aid cuts and removal of the right of defendants to choose their own solicitor. (The Guardian)
  • South African athlete Oscar Pistorius appears in court charged with the murder of his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. (RTE)
  • A woman in Malleswaram, India is freed from an apparent four-year house confinement by her parents. (The Hindu)
  • An America tourist is allegedly gang raped and robbed by three men in Manali, India. (Times of India)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2013 protests in Turkey:
    • Turkey's Ahmet Davutoğlu announces an investigation into police attacks on civilians with tear gas and water cannon in cities nationwide. (Al Jazeera)
    • An image known as "The Lady in the Red Dress" showing a policeman in a gas mask hosing a woman with pepper spray becomes the defining image of Turkey's pro-democracy demonstrations thus far. (The Huffington Post) (The Guardian) (The National)
    • Following Turkish prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan's denunciation of Twitter as a "menace to society", police arrest 25 people on charges relating to the use of social media to speak ill of the government. (The Guardian)
  • Kandahar massacre: U.S. staff sergeant Robert Bales avoids the death penalty by pleading guilty to the murder of 16 Afghan civilians, including 9 children. (Al Jazeera) (New York Times)
  • After a long-running battle, Britain announces a compensation fund of £2,600 each for more than 5,000 survivors of the prison camps it operated across Kenya in the 1950s. (The Guardian)
  • Syrian civil war:
  • Iraqi insurgency (post-U.S. withdrawal):
    • Fourteen people are killed at a fake security checkpoint manned by gunmen in western Iraq. (BBC)
Arts and culture
  • Actor Stephen Fry reveals that he nearly died after taking a cocktail of drugs and alcohol last year. (The Independent) (The Daily Telegraph)
  • Novelist Turki al-Hamad, who was jailed in December for six months without trial over his calls for reform in Saudi Arabia, is released. (Al Jazeera)
  • An 84-year-old woman from the U.S. state of Florida comes forward as the sole winner of the record-breaking $590 million Powerball lottery drawing in May. (Reuters)
  • Bangladesh lifts a ban on YouTube that had been in effect since September 2012. (Tri-Valley Herald)
  • Prince Philip is admitted to a London hospital for an exploratory operation. (CNN)
  • Paris Jackson, Michael Jackson's daughter, tries to commit suicide by cutting her wrists and overdosing on pills. (MSN Music Wonderwall)
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
Health and environment
  • A second case of Legionnaires' Disease in less than a week is confirmed in Australia, leading to fears of a possible outbreak of the rare disease. (Herald Sun)
Law and crime
  • United States v. Bradley Manning:
    • The judge disallows discussion of Bradley Manning's motives for leaking classified material to WikiLeaks at this time. (The Guardian)
    • Brian Madrid, who trained Manning, testifies that he ordered him to undergo "corrective training" for an unauthorized use of the phrase "top secret". (The Guardian)
  • The jailing for two years of former Met Police officer Paul Flattley, who sold information to News International daily tabloid The Sun about Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Paul Gascoigne and a 15-year-old girl who died of an overdose, is revealed for the first time today, "legal reasons" having prevented its disclosure until now. (The Guardian) (The Independent)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Gunmen ambush a bus in Al Anbar Governorate, Iraq, killing 10 border police and 5 civilians. (Reuters)
  • Two Tunisian soldiers are killed and two wounded by a roadside bomb while hunting Al-Qaeda militants in a mountainous region near the Algerian border. (ABC), (BBC)
  • It is reported that an increasing number of hunger-striking Guantánamo inmates are being force fed by military medical teams since Barack Obama's recent speech promised again to close the prison camp. (The Guardian) (Press TV) (The Washington Post)
  • War in Afghanistan (2001–present): Seven Georgian servicemen are killed and nine wounded in an insurgent attack with a truck bomb on the ISAF base in Shir Ghazay, Afghanistan. (Civil Georgia)
Arts and culture
Health
International relations
Law and crime
  • The Guardian obtains a copy of a court order signed on April 25 by Judge Roger Vinson of the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC). The order permits the FBI, and thereby the Obama administration, to indiscriminately collect phone records of millions of Verizon Communications customers on an "ongoing, daily basis", with all domestic and international calls affected. The permit is similar to one issued to the Bush administration. The Guardian's report does not state from whom they obtained the document. (The Guardian)
  • PRISM (U.S. government surveillance program):
    • The Guardian obtains a copy of a document from April that reveals that the NSA is mining data using PRISM, spying on the e-mails and web activities of American citizens through direct access to Google, Apple, Microsoft, Facebook, YouTube, Skype, Yahoo, Paltalk and AOL. The Guardian's report does not state from whom they obtained the document. (USA Today) (PC World) (The Guardian)
  • The Obama administration defends its secret surveillance policies. (Al Jazeera)
  • 12 Russian citizens appear in a Moscow court charged with offences at a 2012 anti-Vladimir Putin rally; critics claim it is reminiscent of the Soviet-era show trials. (BBC)
  • French Left wing activist Clement Meric dies after being attacked on Wednesday in Paris shopping district by a group of far-right skinheads. (News Limited)
Politics and election
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Elizabeth II appears in the BBC newsroom behind the BBC News Channel's newsreaders while they are live on air. (The Guardian) (BBC)
  • Bangkok tops the list of world's most visited cities. (Forbes)
  • Russian president Vladimir Putin and his wife of thirty years announce their divorce on live television. (BBC)
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
  • A bus catches fire in the Chinese city of Xiamen, killing at least 42 people and injuring more than 30 others. (AP via ABC News)
  • A bus plunges off a mountain road in the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh, killing at least 18 people and injuring 14 others. (BBC)
  • A passenger bus hits a mountainside near Nha Trang, Viet Nam, killing at least nine people and injuring many others. (vietnambreakingnews)
Health and environment
  • Breast milk boosts brain development by 30%, as compared to formula-fed babies, according to a new study. (Daily Mail)
International relations
Law and crime
  • PRISM (U.S. government surveillance program):
    • The US government comes under heavy criticism at home and abroad when news of its secret PRISM surveillance program to monitor emails and other person information is leaked. (Welt)
    • The Wall Street Journal reveals the National Security Agency's monitoring of American citizens includes credit-card transactions and customer records from the three major phone networks. (The Wall Street Journal)
    • Democratic Senator Joe Manchin calls on Attorney General Eric Holder to resign over the U.S. Department of Justice's seizure of journalist phone records. (TPM)
    • The Guardian reveals U.S. President Barack Obama ordered a list of foreign targets for cyber-attacks "to advance US national objectives around the world with little or no warning to the adversary or target and with potential effects ranging from subtle to severely damaging". Obama's order also authorizes hits on foreign nations without their government's consent. (The Guardian)
    • U.S. director of national intelligence James Clapper denounces the revelations of government surveillance into civilian lives as "reprehensible". (The Guardian)
    • British Prime Minister David Cameron is urged to launch an investigation into allegations that the UK's electronic listening post GCHQ had access to data from the program. (BBC)
  • Richard Ramirez, a prolific American serial killer during the 1980s, dies on death row from liver failure. (Reuters)
  • Ariel Castro, the man accused of kidnapping 3 Cleveland, Ohio women is indicted on 329 charges, including 2 counts of murder. (CBS News)
  • Cambodia passes a controversial law that makes it illegal to deny atrocities committed by the Khmer Rouge regime. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • Asteroid 2013 LR6 passes within 65,000 miles of Earth the day after it is discovered. (Nature World News)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
  • A fire destroys 150 stores in Lagos, Nigeria. (The Punch)
Health and environment
  • An outbreak of Hepatitis A linked to a fruit juice product made by Townsend Farms sickens 79 people in the United States. (RTT News)
Law and crime
  • U.S. government surveillance programs (including PRISM):
    • A former CIA employee named Edward Snowden comes forward as the source of recent NSA leaks in the United States. Fearful of prosecution for his actions, he defects to Hong Kong. (Washington Post)
  • 300 Muslims are arrested in Moscow, Russia while they pray at a mosque in an apparent crackdown on radical Islam. (Fox News)
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Bombs explode across Iraq, killing at least 70 people and wounding many more, following a month of attacks bloodier than any the country has experienced since June 2008. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • The Venezuelan government arrests nine Colombian right-wing paramilitaries over a plot to assassinate President Nicolás Maduro. (BBC)
  • Syrian civil war:
    • A fierce battle has gone on over the last 24 hours as rebels launch another attack against the Menagh Air Base, the last remaining Syrian government controlled airbase in Aleppo. (Al Jazeera)
  • War in Afghanistan (2001–present):
    • Seven heavily armed Taliban militants launch a coordinated attack near the main international airport of the Afghan capital, Kabul, and seize a five-story building under construction nearby. Afghan security forces retake the building, killing all seven militants and sustaining no military or civilian casualties. (BBC)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
  • U.S. government surveillance programs (including PRISM):
    • William Hague answers parliamentary questions on Britain's role in the U.S. surveillance scandal, though MPs and activists express dissatisfaction with his answers on whether Britain is similarly spying on its own citizens. (The Independent) (The Guardian) (Press TV) (Al Jazeera)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Bills banning homosexual "propaganda" pass through Russia's parliament; gay people are hit with eggs by anti-gay extremists and then dragged off by police near the Duma. (Al Jazeera) (The Independent) (The Guardian) (USA Today)
Business and economics
  • Greek broadcaster ERT is shut as part of austerity measures. (Euronews) (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
  • U.S. government surveillance programs (including PRISM):
    • European Union officials send a letter to U.S. attorney general Eric Holder with seven detailed questions requesting concrete explanations about the country's data snooping programs and how it affects EU citizens ahead of a meeting in Dublin this Friday. (The Guardian) (The Journal)
    • The American Civil Liberties Union lays down the first constitutional challenge to the U.S. programs of spying on its own citizens. ACLU accuses the U.S. government of "snatching every American's address book". (The Guardian)
    • Expecting to be rendered or otherwise targeted by the CIA or its allies or third parties, Edward Snowden checks out of the Hong Kong hotel in which he based himself after revealing the U.S. spy scandal to the public. (Al Jazeera)
Law and crime
International relations
  • A UK government decision to create a controversial marine park in the Indian Ocean gets the go-ahead, though the intentions are questioned by former residents of the Chagos Islands all of whom were expelled by the British between 1965 and 1973 so that an airbase could be built by the United States on Diego Garcia. (The Guardian)
  • North Korea calls off talks with South Korea, according to officials from the South, amid a disagreement over the pairing of Ryoo Kihl-jae (South) and Kim Yang Gon (North). (AP via The Washington Post)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • Shenzhou 10, China's fifth manned spaceflight mission and the second and final one to the Tiangong-1 space laboratory, is launched with 3 taikonauts on a 15 day mission. (BBC) (CNN)
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
Health and environment
Law and crime
  • A Tunisian court sentences two French and one German members of the FEMEN movement to four months in jail for protesting topless. (AP via ABC News)
Politics and elections
  • 2013 protests in Turkey: The Turkish government offers to put the development project that sparked the initial protests to a public vote. (CBC)
  • New figures from UNICEF show that 150 million children are engaged in child labor worldwide. (Pakistan Daily Times)
  • Russia's Duma passes a law banning "gay propaganda". (CBS News)
Science
Sports
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
Health and environment
  • United States Supreme Court rules that isolated human genes are not patentable, invalidating BRCA gene patents held by Myriad Genetics. (WSJ)
Law and crime
Politics and government
  • The incumbent President of Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe, determines that elections will be scheduled for 31 July 2013, however Mugabe's leading presidential contestant and primary political rival Morgan Tsvangirai rejects this as being "a unilateral and flagrant breach of the constitution". (allAfrica)
Armed conflict and attacks
  • Syrian civil war:
    • The United States offers unspecified military equipment to the rebels after determining that the Syrian regime used chemical weapons against the opposition. (Al Jazeera)
Disasters and accidents
  • A search and rescue operation gets underway after a Roll-on/roll-off ferry carrying about 60 people capsizes off the island of Burias in the Philippines Masbate province. So far 34 people have been rescued and at least one death confirmed. (ABC Online), (BBC)
  • A crowded outdoor deck behind a popular Miami-area sports bar collapses during the NBA Finals, sending dozens of people into the shallow waters of Biscayne Bay (AP via News24) (Miami Herald)
  • Near Colorado Springs, destructive wildfires claim hundreds of homes and at least 2 lives. (LA Times)
  • A day after an ethylene- and propylene- manufacturing chemical plant explosion in Geismar, Ascension Parish, Louisiana that killed two and injured 75, another chemical plant explosion occurs in the same Louisiana Parish (County), in Donaldsonville, Louisiana. One person is killed, three are critically injured, and 2 others suffer more minor injuries. (NBC) (CNN)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Man of Steel sets an all-time June record by grossing an estimated US$113 million in its opening weekend in the United States and Canada. (Reuters)
  • Kim Kardashian gives birth to a daughter. (USA Today)
Business and economics
  • Weyerhaeuser agrees to buy Longview Timber for US$2.65 billion. (Seattle Times)
Disasters and accidents
  • A 5.8-magnitude earthquake in southwestern Mexico causes power outages in Mexico City. (CNN) (Reuters)
  • Heavy rains in Uttarakhand, India result in wide-spread flooding, landslides, and at least 3 deaths. (Indian Express)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Religion
Sport
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • Boeing launches the biggest version of its Dreamliner plane, the 787-10, at the Paris Air Show with over 100 orders worth about US$30 billion. (AFP vis News24)
  • The Indian Rupee falls to a new record low against the US dollar. (Business Standard)
  • Chrysler agrees to recall 1.56 million Jeeps in the United States. (USA Today)
Disasters
  • 2013 North India floods:
    • The death toll from several days of heavy rain, flooding, and landslides in Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, and Himachal Pradesh, hits 99. (Times of India)
    • More than 73,000 religious pilgrims and 1,700 tourists are stranded. (Times of India)
  • 2013 NBA Finals:
    • The San Antonio Spurs lead by 5 points against the Miami Heat with 28 seconds remaining in game 6 of the NBA finals as a victory will secure a fifth NBA title for the Spurs. They fail to collect a defensive rebound, allow Miami to score back-to-back three-pointers and go 1 out of 2 on the free throw line. The game is sent to overtime where they eventually lose by three points.
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and Technology
  • Huawei unveils the world's slimmest smartphone, the Ascend P6. (BBC)
  • Tianhe-2 is named the world's fastest supercomputer per the TOP500. (China Daily)
  • New data suggests that as many as 280 previously unknown craters exist on The Moon. (International Business Times)
  • A news study finds that chickens possess numeracy skills and self-control. (Herald Sun)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
  • The Indian Army is deployed to help rescue people in the flood-hit northern states of Uttarakhand and Himachal Pradesh, where the number of confirmed deaths has reached 130. (BBC)
  • A man is killed and more than 6,000 people are evacuated following an explosion at an arms depot in the Samara Oblast in central Russia. (Sky News)
  • Flash flooding in southwest France claims two victims and causes the shrine at Lourdes to be closed. (AFP via Channel News Asia)
Law and crime
Science and technology
  • After receiving negative feedback, Microsoft decides to change many features of its upcoming Xbox One. (Xbox Wire)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • Instagram announces that users will be able to upload videos to the service. (ABC News)
  • The Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 record their worst day of 2013, with the Dow Jones dropping 353 points (2.3 percent) and S&P 500 dropping 2.5 percent. (CNNMoney)
Disasters and accidents
Law and crime
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • 2013 Riga Castle fire:
    • Latvian authorities say the overnight fire has extensively damaged Riga Castle, the medieval fortress that houses the Baltic nation's National History Museum, and presidential residence. (EuroNews)
    • Latvian President Andris Bērziņš describes the fire as a "national disaster" during a morning visit to inspect the damage. (Russia Today)
  • A three-story building collapses in the Indian town of Mumbra in Maharashtra state, with at least two deaths and many people reported trapped. (IBN Live), (Hindustan Times)
  • 2013 North India floods: Nearly 14,000 people are believed to be missing in Uttarakhand state, with another 60,000 stranded and 150 killed. (NDTV)
  • 75,000 people are evacuated from their homes during flooding in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. (CNN)
Health
  • Taiwan reports the first human case of the H6N1 virus. (Focus Taiwan)
Law and crime
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • 100,000 workers and unemployed march against record unemployment in Rome, the first major demonstration since Enrico Letta's government took power earlier this year. (Al Jazeera)
Disasters and accidents
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
International relations
  • After a failed U.S. extradition request Hong Kong says does not fully comply with the law, U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden leaves Hong Kong for Moscow. (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian)
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
Law and crime
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • The Under the Dome TV series premieres to 13.5 million viewers in the United States, the largest summertime premiere for a drama since 2007. (Newsday) (Entertainment Weekly)
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • Italian police search more than thirty Italian football clubs including SS Lazio and Juventus FC searching for evidence of criminal conspiracy, international tax evasion, money laundering and invoice falsification. (Reuters)
  • Russian president Vladimir Putin confirms that Edward Snowden is currently in a Moscow airport's international area; Russia rejects United States extradition demands. (Fox News)
  • Nine are killed in gun battles between paramilitary forces and drug gangs in Rio de Janeiro favelas. (BBC)
  • French anti-terror police arrest six people in Paris who were said to have been planning a terrorist attack on well known figures. (France 24)
  • Four executions take place in Nigeria, the first since 2006. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • China's Shenzhou 10 spacecraft returns to Earth after its crew complete a 15-day mission. (CBS News)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
  • At least 20 people die as an Indian military helicopter trying to rescue victims of the floods in the Himalayan state of Uttarakhand crashes, killing all on board. (AAP via News Limited)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Business and economy
  • European leaders agree to back a deal on the European Union's long-term budget after a deal is done on a rebate for the United Kingdom. (Reuters)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • One trainee member of the Philippine National Police is killed and six injured in an ambush in Mountain Province. (ABS-CBN News)
  • One person is killed and four injured in an attack on a provincial party office in the Egyptian city of Zagazig. (Reuters)
  • Thirty-three are killed in an attack in Nigeria's Plateau State. (Xinhua)
  • Two people are killed and seven injured in a bomb attack in Songkhla, Thailand. (The Nation)
  • Three people are killed and seven injured in an attack in Karachi, Pakistan (Gulf News)
  • Fifteen people are killed in attacks targeting Iraqi police and anti-Al-Qaeda militiamen. (The Daily Star)
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Law and crime
  • A senior Vatican bank cleric, Monsignor Nunzio Scarano, and two others are arrested on suspicion of smuggling €20 million into Italy from Switzerland. (BBC)
  • French businessman Bernard Tapie is placed under investigation for improperly using political influence to benefit his businesses. (Xinhua)
  • A man is arrested in England on charges related to an attack on the John Constable painting The Hay Wain. (AP via Silicon Valley Mercury News)
  • Gay marriage in the state of California is legalized after the stay held on the unconstitutional California Proposition 8 is lifted. Two women who successfully challenged Proposition 8 in the Supreme Court of the United States are married in San Francisco. (NBC News)
Sport
  • Former captain of the Pakistan cricket team Salman Butt admits to fixing matches in 2010. (The News International)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • Four men including the pilot die in a helicopter crash in southern Switzerland. (AP via News24)
  • 2013 North India floods: A Uttarakhand lawmaker claims the actual death toll from the floods is 10,000, ten times the official estimate. (Hindustan Times)
  • Extreme heat in Las Vegas, Nevada, US, leads to dozens of hospitalizations. (LA Times)
International relations
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
  • 175 prisoners in the southern Nigeria town of Akure are freed by armed gunmen who also kill two civilians during the raid. (Reuters)
  • War in North-West Pakistan:
    • A bomb attack on a security convoy in northwest Pakistan kills at least 11 people while injuring 19. (AP via Fox News)
Disasters and accidents
  • At least 30 are killed when a fuel truck explodes on a busy highway outside the Ugandan capital of Kampala. (Reuters)
  • US heatwave:
Politics and elections
Sport
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