Portal:Current events/June 2012

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2012
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June 2012 was the sixth month of that leap year. The month, which began on a Friday, ended on a Saturday after 30 days.

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from June 2012.

Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • World stock markets[which?] hit their lowest level in 2012. (The Guardian)
Health
International relations
  • China arrests a security ministry official on suspicion of spying for the United States; the official is reported to have been blackmailed by the CIA. (BBC)
  • The Japanese yen and the Chinese yuan begin direct trading.(Yomiuri)
Law and crime
  • The Venezuelan government outlaws the commercial sale of guns and ammunition, the latest in a series of initiatives to improve security and cut crime. (BBC)
  • Samoa announces the pardon of 35 prisoners to celebrate the 50th anniversary of its independence from New Zealand. (BBC)
  • The Food and Drug Administration, a U.S. government agency, goes to court to secure supplies of a drug used in lethal injections, which have dwindled since an importation ban. (BBC)
Politics and elections
  • Counting of votes in the Irish referendum on the European Fiscal Compact gets underway, with early tallies indicating the Compact has been approved. (Reuters via Yahoo! News Australia) (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
Law and crime
  • A court in Cairo, Egypt, finds former president Hosni Mubarak and former interior minister Habib al-Adly guilty for complicity in the killings of demonstrators in the 2011 revolution that ousted Mubarak and both are sentenced to life in prison. Mubarak and his two sons, Gamal and Alaa, are all acquitted on separate corruption charges. (BBC)
  • A shooting in the food court of the Eaton Centre mall in Toronto, Canada kills at least one man and injures seven other people. (BBC) (The Canadian Press via Canada.com)
Sports
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
  • A plane carrying 153 people on board crashes in a residential neighborhood in Lagos, Nigeria, killing everyone on board and 10 people on the ground. (CNN)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Sports
Armed conflict and attacks
  • Mexican Drug War: gunmen kill 11 people at a rehabilitation clinic in the city of Torreón, Coahuila. (Reuters)
  • A US drone attack kills at least 15 suspected militants in Pakistan's North Waziristan region. High ranked al-Qaeda official Abu Yahya al-Libi is killed in the attack. (AFP via NineMSN) (The Guardian)
  • A car bomb explodes near Iraqi government offices in central Baghdad, killing at least 26 and injuring 190. Eight others are killed in additional attacks across the country. (AP via The Brisbane Times) (Antiwar)
  • Buddhist vigilantes attack a bus in western Myanmar, killing nine Muslim passengers. (Reuters)
  • Aftermath of the Libyan civil war:
    • A heavily armed militia takes over a runway at the Tripoli International Airport, demanding the release of their leader who went missing. (BBC)
    • A Libyan military court sentences a group of Russian, Belarussian and Ukrainian men to long prison terms, having found them guilty of serving as mercenaries for Muammar Gaddafi in the Libyan Civil War. A Russian who was deemed the group's leader was sentenced to life imprisonment, and the rest were sentenced to 10 years in prison with hard labor. (Reuters)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Japan's S&P/TOPIX 150 reaches its lowest level since 1983 as global stock markets continue to fall. (Wall Street Journal)
Disasters
  • At least 23 people are killed and 60 injured after a bus carrying a wedding party crashes near the Pakistani capital Islamabad. (AFP via Perth Now)
Law and crime
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Starbucks Corporation is embroiled in controversy after asking its Irish customers if they are "proud to be British." (The Guardian)
International relations
Politics
Science
  • The last transit of Venus of the 21st century begins at 22:09 UTC on June 5, and ends at 04:49 UTC on June 6. (BBC)
Armed conflict and attacks
  • NATO planes launch an air strike on Afghanistan, allegedly killing civilians in the process. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • Arab Spring:
    • Syrian uprising: Opposition activists on the ground in Syria report that a massacre has been committed in the small village of Qubair, Hama, by the government-hired Shabiha militia. Activists report 78 dead, mostly women and children. (BBC)
    • Bahraini uprising: Bahraini authorities re-arrest Nabeel Rajab on suspicion of posting tweets seen as critical of the Bahraini regime. (BBC)
  • 2012 Armenian-Azeri border clashes: a new clash kills an Armenian soldier. (panorama.am)
  • At least twenty people are killed near Kandahar Airport in southern Afghanistan by a motorcycle bomb. (Reuters)
  • Controversy is stoked after a video emerges of a U.S. religious minister outlining his plan to imprison the country's gay and lesbian population behind an electric fence until they die. (Al Jazeera)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
Law and crime
  • The defence of imprisoned U.S. serviceman Bradley Manning receives a boost with a ruling by the judge presiding over his trial at Fort Meade in Maryland ordering the Obama administration to hand over several documents the government had hoped would remain confidential. (The Guardian)
  • Hours after a bill to legalise settlement outposts is rejected, Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu orders the construction of 300 new homes at the Jewish settlement of Beit El in the West Bank. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • Li Wangyang, a labour activist and Chinese dissident jailed after the 1989 crackdown on pro-democracy protesters in Beijing, is found dead in a hospital ward in central China, with foul play suspected. (Reuters UK)
Politics and elections
Science
Sport
  • Footballer Mahmoud al-Sarsak, who has been on hunger strike for 80 days while in prison without trial or charge, faces imminent danger of death according to human rights groups. (BBC)
  • Cardiff City Football Club announces it is to change to a red kit from its traditional blue, effective immediately. (Press Association via The Guardian)
  • Four-time world snooker champion Ronnie O'Sullivan announces his decision to take time off from the game. (BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • U.S. military drone attacks carried out by the CIA on Pakistan raise serious legal questions, announces United Nations human rights chief Navi Pillay at the end of a fact-finding visit to Pakistan. (BBC)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Credit agency Fitch slashes Spain's rating to BBB. (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian)
  • Argentine president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner announces she is switching her personal savings from the U.S. dollar to the Argentine peso. (BBC)
  • LinkedIn says that some of its members' passwords have been "compromised" following reports that more than six million passwords were leaked on the Internet. (BBC)
  • Last.fm also reports that some of its passwords have been leaked and urges users of its website to change them immediately. (BBC)
Disasters
  • A helicopter with foreign nationals on board goes missing in an Amazon region of southern Peru. (BBC) (AFP via France24) (Al Jazeera)
  • Two apartment buildings collapse following a gas leak in the Italian town of Conversano, resulting in four people being missing. (Reuters)
  • At least 16 people die and 32 are injured after a bus falls into a ravine north of the Bolivian capital La Paz. (AP via Google News)
  • A small Pilatus PC-12/47 aircraft crashes in a remote rural area of Florida in the Tiger Creek Swamp area near Lake Wales, Florida, southeast of Lakeland, Florida in the central portion of the state. The airplane began to break up at around 26,000 feet in southeastern Polk County, Florida. (MSNBC)
International relations
Law and crime
  • An Israeli court paves the way for the deportation of hundreds of illegal South Sudanese migrants, despite opposition to the move from human rights groups. (Deutsche Welle) (Al Arabiya) (The Times of Israel)
Politics and elections
  • A Golden Dawn politician assaults two other politicians on a live television talk show and flees the scene ; at least one copycat incident is reported to have taken place with two MPs being assaulted by the neo-Nazi party's supporters. (The Guardian)
  • UK Labour leader Ed Miliband claims that so-called "Englishness" is being overlooked in the debate about Scottish independence, though he rejects calls for an English Parliament. (BBC) (The Guardian)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Arab Spring:
    • Syrian uprising:
      • United Nations monitors reach the site of the massacre in Mazraat al-Qubeir, where up to 78 people are reported to have been killed. (Daily Star Lebanon)
      • One person is shot dead and three others wounded by gunfire in clashes in a pro-Syrian government neighbourhood of Tripoli, Lebanon. (France 24)
    • Bahraini uprising: Bahraini authorities tear gas and sound bomb a pro-democracy rally, among the largest such rallies there in recent weeks. Meanwhile, a defence lawyer confirms that a court hearing is scheduled for next week in the case of a jailed 11-year-old boy accused of protesting against the regime. (Al Jazeera) (Press TV)
    • Egyptian protestors rally on the streets of Cairo to demand the ban of the ousted regime's last prime minister Ahmed Shafiq from standing in the country's presidential run-off election. (Press TV)
    • The people of Jordan rally in Amman against their government's decision to raise fuel and electricity prices to ease budget deficit. (Press TV)
  • 7 United Nations peacekeepers from Niger are killed in an ambush in Ivory Coast. (Al Jazeera)
  • Mexican Drug War: At least 14 mutilated corpses are abandoned inside a vehicle in Ciudad Mante, Tamaulipas, about 250 miles from the Texas border. The bodies are accompanied by a banner taking credit for the killings. (Los Angeles Times)
  • A bomb targeting a bus carrying Government of Pakistan employees kills 32 people. (AP via Newser)
  • Amnesty International issues a report claiming that Israel is guilty of torture and human rights violations, but the report is criticised as biased because of the alleged involvement of an anti-Israel activist in its writing. (Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Chesapeake Energy shareholders, at their annual meeting, reject two incumbent directors in a vote widely regarded as a repudiation of CEO Aubrey McClendon. (BusinessWeek)
International relations
Law and crime
  • A military judge at Fort Meade in Maryland rejects dropping charges against imprisoned U.S. serviceman Bradley Manning and says his trial would likely be delayed by two months until November. (Press TV) (The Guardian) (Voice of America)
  • Chuck Blazer, the FIFA official who blew the whistle on corruption within the governing body last year, faces accusations by Jack Warner of secretly funding the rent on a luxury New York apartment using funds from the football federation he ran. (BBC)
  • Jamaican "drug lord" Christopher "Dudus" Coke is sentenced to 23 years in a U.S. prison. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economy
  • Spain's economy and finance minister Luis de Guindos confirms the receipt of up to 100 billion euros ($125 billion) in loans to help shore up its struggling banks, with the exact amount to be determined by the end of the month. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
Disasters
  • Search crews locate the wreckage of a missing Sikorsky H-34 helicopter near Mt. Mamarosa in southern Peru, with all 14 on board confirmed dead. (BBC) (Aviation Safety) (Al Jazeera)
  • 400 people are trapped by landslides in the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. (IBN live)
  • Over 12 inches of rain fail on Pensacola, Florida and adjacent areas, leading to widespread flooding. (Weather Channel)
  • More than 150 people are helped to safety by emergency services after heavy overnight rain caused flooding in Wales. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Data released on the website of the General Administration of Customs in the People's Republic of China indicates that China is significantly increasing its importation of crude oil to a record high, and some refineries have increased their processing rate. (Business Week)
Disasters
International relations
  • Over documents delivered to Saif al-Islam, detained son of slain leader Muammar Gaddafi, Libya arrests an Australian lawyer from the International Criminal Court (ICC) for trying "to deliver documents to the accused, documents that have nothing to do with his case and that represent a danger to the security of Libya". (Al Jazeera)
Law and crime
  • Three people are shot to death and three are wounded during a party held at an apartment complex near the campus of Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama, U.S. (CNN)
Politics
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
  • The size of the Nobel Prize is being reduced by 20% in order to avoid an undermining of its capital in a long-term perspective. (Nobel Foundation) (BBC)
  • After six years, Google reaches a deal with a publishing group that opposed its scanning and publishing of books online. (BBC)
  • Madonna exposes her right breast on stage in Istanbul. (Hindustan Times) (Irish Independent)
  • Lady Gaga suffers a concussion after smacking her head with a pole during a show in New Zealand. (MTV)
  • A pan-Arab satellite television channel, Al Mayadeen ("The Squares" in Arabic), is launched in Lebanon that is speculated to be a mouthpiece for Iran and Hezbollah. (AP via AJC)
Business
  • Dangote Cement opens a new line of production at its Obajana facility in the Kogi State, making the plant the largest in Sub-Sahara Africa and one of the largest in the world. (AFP)
Disasters
International relations
  • Somalia–United States relations:
    • Al-Shabaab offers a reward of 10 camels for information about the whereabouts of Barack Obama and chickens for information on Hillary Clinton in response to the U.S. announcement of rewards of $3-7 million for various militant commanders. (BBC)
    • The U.S. threatens to impose sanctions on individual Somalis oppose peace plan. (BBC)
  • The U.S. withdraws a team of negotiators from Pakistan, with The Pentagon announcing: "The decision was reached to bring the team home for a short period of time". (BBC)
  • The U.S. grants permission to seven countries on three continents to continue importing oil from Iran in contravention of the declared U.S. policy of isolating Iran. (BBC)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • A day after the arrest of opposition politicians, a mass anti-Putin protest takes place in central Moscow. (Al Jazeera) (BBC) (The New York Times) (AP via Time)
  • The Falkland Islands government announces that it will hold a referendum on the islands' sovereignty next year. (BBC)
  • Turkey announces plans to introduce elective Kurdish language course in schools, a step aimed at easing tension that Kurdish minority activists argue does not go far enough. (AP via Fox News) (Al Jazeera)
  • Voters in the 8th congressional district in the US state of Arizona go to the polls for a special election caused by the resignation of Gabrielle Giffords due to health reasons with Democrat Ron Barber duly elected. (The Hill)
Science and health
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • A series of bombings across Iraq, including Baghdad, Hillah and Kirkuk, kills at least 93 people and wounds over 300 others. (Al Jazeera) (BBC)
  • An airstrike kills nine al Qaida fighters in southern Yemen as the Yemeni military maintain pressure on the group a day after government troops backed by armed tribesmen recaptured two militant strongholds. (AP via ABC News)
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • Bankrupt car maker Saab is sold to a Chinese-Swedish investment group, aiming at transforming the company into a maker of electric vehicles. (BBC)
  • Greeks withdraw their cash from banks and stock up on non-perishable food ahead of Sunday's election. (Al Jazeera)
  • Syrian uprising: The Syrian government begins printing money for the first time in a sign that the Syrian economy is on the verge of total collapse. (The Atlantic Wire)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and health
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Arab Spring:
  • Mexican Drug War: Víctor Manuel Báez Chino, a journalist for the Mexican newspaper Milenio, is found dead after being kidnapped in the coastal state of Veracruz. (Milenio)
  • Violent protests demanding election reform in Togo enter into a third day. (BBC)
  • Indonesian police kill separatist leader Mako Tabuni, causing violent protests. (BBC)
  • The U.S. military expands its secret network of air bases across Africa, according to reports in the U.S. media. (Al Jazeera) (Washington Post)
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • German deputy finance minister Steffen Kampeter rejects calls to pool European debt, saying "debt is a national responsibility." (BBC)
  • Nokia announces it will cut 10,000 jobs. (BBC)
  • Coca-Cola says that it will start doing business in Burma after sixty years as soon as the U.S. government issues a license allowing American companies to make such investments. (The Washington Times)
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and health
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • The Yemeni army captures Shuqra, the third militant stronghold to fall in the last week. (BBC)
  • Police officers attempting to evict landless farmers occupying a property in the Paraguayan department of Canindeyú turn into clashes, killing 16 officers and farmers. (BBC)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
  • Police in Japan arrest Katsuya Takahashi of the Aum Shinrikyo cult, the last fugitive wanted over the March 1995 sarin gas attack on the Tokyo subway that killed 13 people. (BBC)
  • China suspends three officials and the government of Ankang city apologizes to a woman, Feng Jianmei, 23, who is forced to undergo an illegal abortion seven months into her pregnancy after graphic photos of the mother and her dead baby are circulated online. (AP via The Star)
  • Baker Atyani, Al Arabiya's TV bureau chief for southeast Asia, disappears with four other people on the restive southern Philippine island of Jolo where Muslim militants are active. (AP via TIME)
  • Three employees of an armoured car company are reported dead and one injured in a shooting at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. (CBC News)
Politics and elections
Religion
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
Law and crime
  • A priest is stabbed to death in a church in the city of Focșani, Romania. (Realitatea TV)
  • One of the United States's most wanted fugitives, Air Force deserter David A. Hemler, has reportedly been living and working in Stockholm, Sweden, for the past 28 years. (Dagens Nyheter)
Politics and elections
Science
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Multiple bombings kill at least 12 people in the northern Nigerian state of Kaduna. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • Google reveals it has removed so-called 'terrorism videos' from the web at the request of governments, as well as blocking more than 100 YouTube videos which allegedly insult the Thai monarchy. (BBC)
Disasters
  • A fire breaks out in a prison in the southeast Turkish province of Şanlıurfa, killing 13 prisoners. (BBC)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
  • It is disclosed that Jack Osbourne has the incurable neurological condition multiple sclerosis (MS). (BBC)
  • The music world expresses shock at the news of Scott Johnson's death ahead of a Radiohead concert in Canada. (BBC)
Business and economy
  • Australian newspaper publisher Fairfax Media announces restructuring plans which will lead to a cut of 1900 jobs. (The Australian)
  • The largest stockholder of the London-based telecommunications firm Vodafone, institutional investor Orbis, ends its opposition to a planned acquisition by Vodafone of Cable & Wireless Worldwide; the deal now seems certain to go through. (Reuters)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
  • Blue Gene/Q becomes the world's fastest supercomputer. (TOP500)
Sport
  • UEFA Euro 2012:
    • Italy trash ten-man Ireland to go through to the quarter-finals, with Ireland on their worst run for more than 40 years. (BBC) (RTE)
    • UEFA fines and bans Nicklas Bendtner of Denmark for one game after showing boxer shorts with a brand name on it against Portugal. Bendtner says: "I didn't know I was breaking any rules". (Al Jazeera) (BBC)
  • Next season's soccer fixtures:
  • British police investigate tennis player David Nalbandian after yesterday's disqualification from the final of the 2012 AEGON Championships over kicking an advertising board into the left shin of a line judge, seriously injuring him; his opponent, Marin Čilić, who was trailing Nalbandian at the time, was awarded the title and Nalbandian lost the prize money he would have received for finishing as runner-up. (BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economics
International relations
Law and crime
  • The former Prime Minister of Romania, Adrian Năstase, narrowly survives a suicide attempt by gunshot to the throat following a controversial court decision sentencing him to two years in jail. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Sport
  • UEFA Euro 2012:
    • UEFA Euro 2012's off-day is dominated by the fall-out of yesterday's ghost goal scored by Ukraine against England, with John Terry hooking the ball from behind the goal line after a shot by Marko Dević under the eyes of the additional assistant beside the goal. (The Daily Telegraph) (Reuters via Yahoo!)
    • As Ukrainian media criticise the incident and denial of at least a point to Ukraine, UEFA's chief refereeing officer Pierluigi Collina says the goal should have been given. (The Daily Telegraph)
    • Italy coach Cesare Prandelli thanks UEFA president Michel Platini after his side secured qualification for the quarter-finals, thanks in part to the extra officials beside the goal. (The Daily Telegraph)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • U.S. artist LeRoy Neiman, one of the world's most commercially successful contemporary artists and an official painter of five Olympiads famed for his instant renditions of sporting action, dies in New York. (BBC)
  • A Lucian Freud self-portrait painted on an egg shell is sold at auction to a private collector for £27,000. (BBC)
Business and economics
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Palestinian militants fire rockets from the Gaza Strip into Israel severely injuring an elder. Israel launches a missile strike in return, killing two Palestinians. (The Jerusalem Post) (BBC)
  • In a Mexican Drug War-related crime, 14 mutilated corpses are found inside a truck outside of a Mexican supermarket. (Reuters)
  • In the Pakistani city of Quetta, armed people on motorcycles kill eight people; targeting Shias. (Al Jazeera)
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • Tens of thousands of Ulster Bank customers continue to struggle to access their cash after days of problems. (Evening Herald) (The Irish Times) (Irish Examiner)
  • Greece's new coalition seeks to slow down austerity by proposing a two-year extension to the period allocated to it to meet bailout targets, without further cuts to salaries and pensions. (BBC)
Disasters
  • At least eight people are killed and 44 injured after a bus carrying Czech tourists crashes in Croatia. (AP via CP-24)
  • At least 51 people are injured after a bus carrying pensioners crashes in Ireland. (RTE) (Irish Examiner)
  • A major clear-up operation begins after a month's worth of rain falls in 24 hours, causing flooding across parts of northern England. (BBC)
  • 2012 Atlantic hurricane season: Tropical Storm Debby forms in the Gulf of Mexico with a warning issued for the US state of Louisiana. This is the first time since 1851 that four storms have formed before July. (MSNBC) (AP via The Province)
  • 76 monks are taken to hospital following an attack by a swarm of bees at Chedi Luang in Thailand's northern Chiang Mai Province. (BBC)
  • Algo Centre Mall in Elliot Lake, Ontario undergoes a partial structural failure when a segment of the rooftop parking deck collapses into the building. 22 people are injured and two bodies are recovered four days later. (Toronto Star)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • At least 16 Syrian soldiers are killed in clashes with rebels in Aleppo. (BBC)
  • War in North-West Pakistan:
    • Seven Pakistani soldiers are beheaded and four others remain missing after being seized by Taliban militants close to the Afghan border.(BBC)
Business and economics
  • Ulster Bank opens branches on a Sunday for the first time as the payments crisis affecting the bank continues unabated. (BBC)
Disasters
  • Tropical Storm Debby continues to organize off the coast of Florida, lashing the state with high winds and heavy rains. The outer bands of the storm spawn two tornadoes, killing one person near Sarasota. (CNN)
  • Rescue efforts end after a boat capsized near Christmas Island, with more than 90 people still missing. (Al Jazeera)
  • Manitou Springs in the U.S. state of Colorado is evacuated due to a raging wildfire just three miles from the popular vacation town. (ABC)
  • The roof of the Algo Centre Mall in Elliot Lake, Ontario, Canada collapses killing at least one person and trapping several others in the debris. (CBC)
Entertainment
International relations
Law and crime
  • Imprisoned U.S. serviceman Bradley Manning's civilian lawyer argues the U.S. government is deliberately attempting to prevent his client from receiving a fair trial. (The Guardian)
Politics and elections
Science
  • China successfully carries out its first manual docking of a spacecraft between the Shenzhou 9 capsule and Tiangong-1 station. (BBC)
  • Lonesome George, the last known Pinta Island Tortoise, is found dead in the Galapagos Islands. (BBC)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Syrian uprising (2011-present):
    • At least 33 army officers, including a general, defect to Turkey. (BBC) (CNN)
    • Turkey's deputy prime minister, Bülent Arınç, states that Syrian forces opened fire on a second Turkish plane, a CASA search and rescue plane searching for the wreckage of an F-4 fighter jet earlier shot down by Syria. (AP via FOX News) (BBC)
  • At least 40 people are injured due to a fire attack by protesters on a religious shrine in India. (GloboNews)
  • Mexican Drug War: Alleged drug traffickers shoot and kill 3 policemen who were on an anti-narcotics operative inside the Mexico City International Airport. The assassins were wearing law enforcement uniforms, although the Mexican authorities said that the cartel members sometimes wear false uniforms. No suspects have been arrested. (Yahoo! News)
  • War On Terror: The chief of one of Britain's top intelligence agencies says that potential British terrorists are going to countries that have been made unsecure by the Arab Spring to get training from Al Qaeda. (Reuters)
Business and economics
  • Tens of thousands of Ulster Bank customers will now be unable to access their money until at least the end of the week as the crisis worsens, with monthly salaries due to be paid this week. (The Irish Times) (Irish Examiner)
  • Greece's new finance minister Vassilis Rapanos resigns due to ill health. (Reuters)
  • Cyprus says that it plans to ask its European partners for a loan of about 1.8 billion euros by the end of this week; this would make Cyprus the fifth European country to seek help. (Reuters) (Al Jazeera)
International relations
Law and crime
  • The pre-trial hearing of imprisoned U.S. serviceman Bradley Manning takes place at Fort Meade, Maryland. (WBAL Radio)
  • The mother of Julian Assange reports that the WikiLeaks editor-in-chief has been "buoyed" by the public's support since he sought refuge in Ecuador's London embassy, refers to U.S. threats to withdraw billions of dollars in aid from Ecuador if it granted asylum, and condemns the Australian government, which has not sought to intervene on behalf of her son, as "nothing more than a puppet" of the United States. (BBC)
  • Channel 4 news anchor Jon Snow tells the Leveson Inquiry that Associated Newspapers, which publishes the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday, is worse than News International's titles, that it has a "pernicious" and sometimes "mendacious" agenda to undermine people in public life, and predicts that "very possibly they will go after me for saying so". (The Guardian)
  • Indian police report that Sayed Zabiuddin, a key figure allegedly involved in the planning of the deadly Mumbai attacks of 2008, is arrested. (BBC) (Times of India)
  • The United States Supreme Court rules that the sentence of life imprisonment without parole cannot be automatically given to a minor at all, extending its earlier restrictions on its automatic use in cases involving minors. (Catholic News)
  • The United States Supreme Court rules that Arizona's immigration law is mostly unconstitutional, except for the part that allows for law enforcement officers, in the course of their duties, to ask about an illegal immigrant's legal status if they have actual reasons to believe that the person is an immigrant and is here illegally, especially if they are of relevance to a case. (CNN) (Al Jazeera)
Politics
Science and technology
  • Venezuela announces its intent to design unmanned aircraft for defence and to monitor pipelines, dams and other rural infrastructure. (Al Jazeera)
  • The final steel beam of 4 World Trade Center is lifted into place in a ceremony. (AP)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Education
Finance
  • The city of Stockton, California's mediation with creditors fails, forcing the city to declare bankruptcy, making it the largest in the U.S. to do so. (Fox News)
Disasters
Law and crime
  • Imprisoned U.S. serviceman Bradley Manning wins his battle against the U.S. government to account for the steps his prosecutors have taken to disclose to his lawyers evidence that could be crucial in his defence. (The Guardian)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • Social network Facebook perturbs some of its users by making its @facebook.com email system the default contact shown on profiles without asking for permission. (BBC)
  • Zynga unveils FarmVille 2. (BBC)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
  • The Somali president urges everyone to donate funds to Somalia to help combat pirates. (Reuters)
Law
Politics and elections
Science and health
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economics
  • The share price of Barclays bank plunges by 17 per cent after it was hit with a record fine for distorting key interest rates to rig international markets. (Al Jazeera)
  • The Wall Street Journal reports that the board of News Corporation has agreed to split the company into two businesses for publishing and entertainment. (The Wall Street Journal via The Australian)
  • Eurozone leaders hold an emergency meeting on assistance to Spain and Italy. (AP via Seattle PI)
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • A controversial beauty pageant for survivors of The Holocaust is held for the first time in the Israeli city of Haifa. Critics describe it as "offensive" and "macabre." (BBC) (The Times of Israel)
  • The sunken Italian World War II flagship Roma is discovered off the coast of Sardinia. (Die Zeit)
  • Alternative rock band The Flaming Lips set a new Guinness World Record for performing the most live shows in different cities over 24 hours. (BBC)
  • People magazine reports that American actors Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes have announced they will be getting a divorce after five years of marriage. (Fox News) (BBC)
  • Pop star Adele is pregnant with her first child. (BBC)
Business and economics
  • Bob Diamond, the chief executive of Barclays bank, refuses to resign over the bank's role in manipulating interest rates. (BBC)
  • British tax payer funding to support Prince Charles rose by 11% during the past financial year, it is disclosed. (The Guardian)
  • Crisis in the European Union:
    • European Union leaders agree to use a bailout fund to recapitalise struggling banks and to work on a plan for tighter budgetary and political union. (AP via USA Today)
    • World stock markets soar over news of European Union members agreeing on a deal to help some struggling Eurozone members. (CNN)
Disasters
International relations
Politics and elections
  • Over 15000 Japanese protest against nuclear power. (Reuters)
Science
  • The Chinese Shenzhou 9 space capsule lands safely with all three astronauts aboard. (AP via Washington Post)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • A UNESCO World Heritage site is destroyed by Muslim fighters in Timbuktu. The mausoleum of Sidi Mahmoud Ben Amar is destroyed. The fighters are said to have ties with al-Qaida. (The Washington Post)
  • A Salvador Dalí drawing lifted last week from a New York gallery is returned by post. (BBC)
Business and economics
Disasters
Law and crime
  • A top leader of the Texan gang known as Barrio Azteca is extradited to the United States from Mexico. The gang member was responsible for killing two U.S. consulate workers in Ciudad Juárez in March 2010. (Chicago Tribune)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sport
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References

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