Portal:Current events/July 2011

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July 2011 was the seventh month of that common year. The month, which began on a Friday, ended on a Sunday after 31 days.

International holidays

(See Holidays and observances, on sidebar at right, below)

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from July 2011.

Armed conflicts and attacks
  • The United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights claims the Congo government troops raped 121 women between June 11 and 13 then pillaged their villages. (AP via The Washington Post)
  • Arab Spring:
    • 2011 Syrian uprising:
      • Hundreds of thousands of people protest against the regime nationwide as the crackdown against civilians continues. (BBC)
      • The death toll is reported to be at least 11 in Syria today. (Al Jazeera)
    • 2011 Libyan civil war:
      • Rebels withdraw from the town of Bir al-Ghanam, 80km south of Tripoli after coming under rocket attack from forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi. (Reuters)
      • Muammar Gaddafi, speaking via an audio message broadcast to a square in central Tripoli, calls on NATO to stop its bombing campaign or he will target European "homes, offices, families". (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
      • Members at the African Union summit in Equatorial Guinea express annoyance at NATO's intervention in Libya over fears that it is only making the situation worse. (Al Jazeera)
    • 2011 Bahraini uprising: Some expatriate Bahrainis are sent "loyalty pledges" in light of the uprising. (MSNBC)
    • 2011 Yemeni uprising: Demonstrations are held in the capital Sana'a and across the country, while protesters in Ta'izz chant slogans against a possible Saudi Arabian intervention, "Tell Saudi Arabia that Yemen is a republic" and "Yemen is not Bahrain", in reference to Saudi Arabia's suppression of the Bahraini uprising. (Al Jazeera)
  • Freedom Flotilla II:
    • Activists increase their guard of the remaining boats bound for Gaza following the alleged sabotage of other boats. (The Jerusalem Post) (Al Jazeera)
    • Greek authorities prevented a US-flagged vessel, The Audacity of Hope, carrying dozens of U.S. activists, from departing for the Gaza Strip, towing it back to the port of Perama after commandos, reportedly carrying weapons, intercept it. (Al Jazeera) (The Jerusalem Post)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
  • The towns of Colman and Flandreau in the US state of South Dakota are hit by a heavy storm resulting in the loss of power for several days. (Argus Leader)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
Law and crime
  • 228 people are arrested during a large demonstration in Hong Kong amid frustration with government policies and rising property prices. (AFP via Google News) (Reuters)
  • China jails a Tibetan writer for editing a banned magazine regarding unrest in 2008. (AFP via Google News) (Reuters) (BBC)
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
International relations
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Sony Corp. says that it will fully restore all the PlayStation Network videogame services in Japan, which will complete worldwide restoration of those services, disrupted in April. (Reuters)
Disasters
  • At least 2 people are killed and 4 others are declared missing after a landslide in a village in western Nepal. (AP via The Washington Post)
  • Several African countries experience their worst drought in 60 years, with millions of people affected. (BBC)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Ghulam Nabi Azad, health minister of India, describes homosexual sex as "unnatural" and homosexuality as a "disease" which is "spreading fast" throughout the country. (BBC) (AP via The Washington Post) (The New Zealand Herald) (The Irish Times)
  • Venezuela celebrates 200 years of independence from Spain featuring street parties and a military parade. (BBC)
  • Sting cancels a performance in Astana, Kazakhstan, in support of striking oil and gas workers and calls for "the spotlight of the international media [to be shone] on their situation in the hope of bringing about positive change". (The Guardian)
  • Sony Music Ireland investigates a possible hacking incident after the early morning appearance of stories relating to R. Kelly, The X Factor and the hoax deaths of members of The Script on its website. (The Irish Times) (RTÉ)
Business and economy
Disasters
Law and crime
  • News of the World phone hacking affair:
    • British tabloid the News of the World faces fresh allegations linking it to hacking activities, this time after it emerges that the mobile phone of murdered 13-year-old schoolgirl Milly Dowler was interfered with and messages left by relatives were deleted. This gave relatives the false impression that Milly Dowler was still alive when she was not. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
    • Colin Stagg, the man who was falsely accused of Rachel Nickell's 1992 murder on Wimbledon Common, is informed that he too had his phone hacked by the News of the World, as many as six years after he was acquitted. Robert Napper later admitted responsibility. (The Guardian)
    • It is revealed that police have contacted the parents of murdered schoolgirls Holly Wells and Jessica Chapman amid concerns that the News of the World tabloid also hacked them. (The Guardian) (Channel 4 News) (BBC) (The Belfast Telegraph)
    • Peta Buscombe, Baroness Buscombe states in an interview on the BBC that the News of the World tabloid told lies to the Press Complaints Commission (PCC), an alteration in opinion. (The Guardian)
    • David Cameron and Ed Miliband condemn the continuing revelations concerning the News of the World's alleged hacking activities. (The Guardian) (Channel 4 News)
    • In an unusual move, House of Commons Speaker John Bercow allows an emergency debate to discuss the possibilities of a public inquiry and of a cover-up, occurring in the House of Commons tomorrow. (The Guardian)
    • Ford Motor Company announces it is pulling all advertising from the News of the World tabloid following reports that it allegedly hacked the voicemail of murdered 13-year-old schoolgirl Milly Dowler; mobile communications company T-Mobile, Currys and PC World all consider joining Ford. (The Financial Times) (The Daily Telegraph)
    • Glenn Mulcaire, the private investigator at the centre of the allegations, apologises for any hurt he has caused. (The Telegraph)
    • The family of a victim of the 7 July 2005 London bombings allegedly had their phones hacked. (Sky News)
  • Both The Sun and Daily Mirror tabloid newspapers are accused of being in contempt of court for publishing articles about the arrest of Christopher Jefferies in relation to the murder of Joanna Yeates; Jefferies was later released without charge. British Attorney General Dominic Grieve is seeking to bring charges against the newspapers. Judges will make a decision on the case at a later date.(BBC) (The Belfast Telegraph)
  • 13 UK Uncut activists appear in court on charges of aggravated trespass after peacefully occupying the luxury London food retailer Fortnum & Mason during a protest against tax avoidance in March. More than 100 other activists are also expected to be put on trial later, with Labour MP John McDonnell claiming such a trial would be "outrageous" and "fly in the face of public opinion". (The Guardian)
  • The Netherlands is held responsible for the deaths of three Bosniaks during the Srebrenica massacre in Bosnia, according to a court ruling in The Hague. (BBC) (Al Jazeera) (Reuters via The Guardian)
  • 25-year-old navy medic Michael Lyons is found guilty in Plymouth of refusing to attend rifle training; Lyons says he developed a moral objection to the war in Afghanistan due to revelations made public by WikiLeaks. (The Guardian)
  • New South Wales police are given more powers to remove burqas as anyone refusing to do so faces fines of thousands of dollars or months behind bars. (BBC) (AFP via France 24) (The Guardian)
  • Up to 7,000 police march on Yonge Street in Newmarket, Ontario, including some Royal Canadian Mounted Police and American officers, accompanied by thousands of spectators for the funeral procession for Canadian YRP police Constable Garrett Styles, killed when a 15-year-old underage driver accelerated during a traffic stop. (CBC) (The Toronto Star) (The Hamilton Spectator)
  • The Supreme Court of England and Wales dismisses an attempt by police to suspend a legal ruling limiting the powers of police bail. (BBC)
  • A Somali man, Ahmed Abdulkadir Warsame, is charged in the US city of New York with assisting the terrorist groups Al Shaabab and Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. (New York Times)
  • Casey Anthony is acquitted of murder in relation to the death of her daughter Caylee, but guilty on four counts of misdemeanor providing false information to a law enforcement officer. (AP via Detroit Free Press)(USA Today)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Iconic Indian filmmaker Mani Kaul dies in Delhi. (BBC) (The Times of India) (Economic Times) (The Telegraph)
Business and economy
Disasters
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
  • Australia bans eight types of synthetic cannabis from tomorrow. (News Limited)
  • A man holds thirty children and teachers hostage in a kindergarten in the city of Muar in Malaysia's Johor state; the hostages are all later rescued when police storm the classroom. (Edmonton Sun)
  • Seven people are shot dead in the US city of Grand Rapids, Michigan, with Rodrick Dantzler the suspect committing suicide and hostages being released. (AP via Google News) (Grand Rapids Press)
  • Humberto Leal García, a Mexican national, is executed in the US state of Texas despite concerns over whether the circumstances of his execution would breach international law. (BBC)
  • Casey Anthony is sentenced to four years for lying to law enforcement regarding the death of her child Caylee in the U.S. state of Florida but after credit for time served will be released on July 17. (Orlando Sentinel)
Politics
Science
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Science
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
International relations
Politics
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
Law and crime
Politics
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Sports
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
  • The poet Liao Yiwu tells the BBC of how he fled China via Vietnam and other countries and arrived in Germany after his struggles with Chinese authorities who have spent decades suppressing his work and imprisoning him. (BBC)
  • A rare manuscript of an unfinished Jane Austen novel has sold for £993,250 (US$1.6m) in London. The work, The Watsons, was sold at Sotheby's for three times its estimated price. (BBC)
Business and economy
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
  • Neptune completes its first orbit of the Sun since its discovery in 1846. (ABC Online)
  • A lost rainbow toad thought to have become extinct after its last sighting in 1924 is rediscovered in Borneo by scientists from Universiti Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS) and photographed for the first time. (BBC Nature)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Indian troops report three deaths in Maidanpora, Kupwara, Kashmir. (BBC)
  • International campaigners against the drone attacks, carried out by the United States in Pakistan, launch their attempt to have former CIA legal chief John A. Rizzo arrested and charged with the murders of hundreds of people after his admission in Newsweek that he approved attacks each month since 2004. (The Guardian)
  • Soldiers, air force bombers and helicopter gunships begin a major offensive in south-eastern Turkey as the country's prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan vows to seek vengeance on Kurdish rebels. (BBC)
  • 2011 Syrian uprising: At least 14 people are killed in the latests attacks by regime forces on demonstrations in cities nationwide. More than 10,000 people are held in prisons by the regime. The demonstrations are reported to be among the largest yet in the ongoing effort to topple the government. (BBC)
  • 13 July 2011 Mumbai bombings: Indian investigators check CCTV footage in their search for clues into Wednesday's triple bombing in Mumbai. (BBC)
Arts and culture
  • Europe's biggest lottery jackpot, £161 million (US$260 million), is scooped by a couple from Largs, Ayrshire, in Scotland. (BBC)

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 2 is released in theaters as the final installment of the famous Harry Potter franchise.

Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Intragalactic relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • Italian MPs in the lower house approve tough budget cuts with 314 votes in favour and 280 against. (BBC)
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and entertainment
Disasters
Law and crime
Politics
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Religion
Science
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Sport
Science
  • The 2011 Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Paris, France announces that Samantha Burnham and others at the Australian national science agency, CSIRO, working with several universities, have produced what may one day become a routine, valid blood test for nine hormones and proteins that, when too high, can serve as predictors of the presence of the hallmark beta amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease.
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Euro zone leaders secure a €109 billion bailout for Greece with the country going into default for a short period, but with increased powers for the main European rescue fund to assist countries that have not been bailed out, such as Spain and Italy. (New York Times)
Disasters
Law and crime
Politics
Science
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
  • China is to ordain seven more bishops, amid a dispute with the Vatican. (AFP via Google News)
  • Elliot Handler who cofounded Mattel with his wife dies at age 95. (The New York Times)
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • At least 41 people are killed in a fire on a bus in Xinyang City, central China. (BBC) (Xinhua)
  • Nepalese officials say monsoon rains have swollen two major rivers in the country and have increased the threat of widespread flooding. (IOL)
  • 2011 Horn of Africa famine
    • The al-Shabaab Islamist militant group in Somalia says a ban on aid groups working in parts of the country remains. (Al Jazeera)
    • Canada is giving C$50 million more, in addition to the $22 million it has already donated, to aid agencies working in East Africa (CBC News)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and entertainment
Business and economy
  • Workers at the Escondida copper mine in northern Chile vote to continue a strike for a second day. (AFP via France24)
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Science
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
  • A Thai military helicopter crashes near the Myanmar border, the third in a week, with three people feared dead in the latest crash. (AP via MSNBC)
  • A car bomb in the Yemeni port of Aden kills at least eight Army soldiers and wounds scores. (Canadian Press via Winnipeg Free Press)
Arts and culture
Politics
Sport
Science
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Moody's cuts Greece's credit rating further to Ca on the grounds that a proposed debt swap is equivalent to a default. (BBC)
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
  • A Moroccan military transport plane crashes into a mountain in the south of the country killing 78 of 81 on board. (BBC News) (Al Jazeera)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Science
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Science
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • Johnson & Johnson announced that it will lower the maximum daily dosage of one of its signature products, Extra Strength Tylenol, in order to reduce the risk of liver damage. (Reuters)
  • Pay-TV company BSkyB secures a seven year deal to share the United Kingdom broadcasting rights of Formula One racing. From March 2012 half the races will air on Sky, while the BBC retains the right to show the other half. (Bloomberg)
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
  • Ajmal Kasab, the last surviving gunman from the 2008 Mumbai terrorist attacks, launches an appeal against his death sentence in India. (Times of India) (Sky News)
  • News International phone hacking scandal
    • The legal team representing Glenn Mulcaire, the private investigator at the centre of claims of phone hacking, says that he "acted on the instructions of others". (BBC)
    • MPs on the Culture, Media and Sport Committee vote not to recall James Murdoch after his evidence was called into question by two senior News International executives. However, he may have to appear again later after more evidence is heard. (BBC)
    • Baroness Peta Buscombe announces her intention to step down as Chair of the Press Complaints Commission following criticism about the way she handled the scandal. (BBC)
    • Broadcaster BSkyB announces its intention to return $1bn to shareholders angered by the recent fall in its share prices. (BBC)
    • Appearing in court, protester Jonathan May-Bowles admits to throwing a foam pie at Rupert Murdoch as he gave evidence to a Parliamentary Committee. (BBC)
  • Christopher Jefferies, an early suspect in the investigation into the murder of Joanna Yeates, accepts "substantial" libel damages from eight British newspapers after they published details of his private life. The Sun and Daily Mirror are also fined for contempt of court in their reporting of the investigation. (BBC)
  • UK based Internet blogger Bilal Zaheer Ahmad is sentenced to 12 years imprisonment after admitting using his blog to solicit the murder of MPs who voted for the Iraq War. (BBC)
  • A U.S. Court of Appeals holds that isolated DNA is "markedly different" in its chemical structure from the DNA within chromosomes, and thus is not simply a product of nature but of human ingenuity. According, the court upholds two patents held by Myriad Genetics against challenge. (New York Times)
Politics
Sport
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
  • At least 17 people are killed in a fire at a shoe factory in the Vietnamese city of Hai Phong. (BBC)
Law and crime
Sports
Armed conflict and attacks
  • At least 9 people including a suspect are killed and 28 others are injured in a knife attack in Kashgar, west Xinjiang, China, marking the second attack of the month in Xinjiang. (CRI) (Xinhua) (The Washington Post)
  • Ramadan Massacre:
    • At least 121 people are killed in a Syrian Army tank raid on the town of Hama and over 150 people are reportedly killed across the country. (Al Jazeera), (Al-Jazeera), (Al-Arabiya)
Disasters and accidents
  • At least seven people drown after a collision between a pleasure boat and a barge in central Moscow, Russia. (The Moscow News) (The Jerusalem Post)
  • No-one was killed when a Caribbean Airlines Boeing 737 plane crashed and split in two at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport, Guyana (The Trinidad Guardian)
Law and crime
Politics
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References

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