Portal:Current events/July 2010

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2010
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July 2010 was the seventh month of that common year. The month, which began on a Thursday, ended on a Saturday after 31 days.

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from July 2010.

Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • People take to the streets in Ottawa to celebrate Canada's 143rd birthday. (CTV)
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • More than 300 kilograms of drugs - opium, morphine, ice (methamphetamine hydrochloride), ketamine and dancing outreach - are incinerated in the suburbs of Lhasa, Tibet. (tibet.cn)
  • An estimated 52,000 people took part in anti-government protests in the former British colony of Hong Kong. BBC News Bloomberg
  • The United States Government actively seizes the domains of 7 U.S. based Websites for copyright infringement and replaces them with this. (The Register UK)
  • The United Kingdom's Forced Marriage Unit (FMU) reports there has been a surge in cases of gay and bisexual men in some communities being forced to marry by their families. (The Guardian)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • Fossils discovered at the Franceville site in Gabon are claimed to be evidence that multicellular life on Earth began at least 1.5 billion years earlier than currently reckoned. (The Australian) (BBC)
  • Astronomers confirm the first-ever direct picture of an extrasolar planet orbiting its star. (National Geographic)
Sport

News

Science

Politics and Elections

Current Events

Politics and Elections

Sports

Current events

Politics and Elections

Sports

Current Events

Science

  • Japanese scientists believe the SELENE probe has spotted rocks that originated deep within the Moon on its surface. (BBC News)

Politics and Elections

Current events

Armed conflicts and incidents

Law and politics

Business and economy

Arts and entertainment

Current events

Science and weather

  • Researchers publish in Nature their discovery of stone tools in Norfolk suggesting that humans landed there almost a million years ago. (BBC)
  • A study shows that a married person's risk of encountering marriage troubles increases by up to 75% if a co-worker, friend, or a family member gets a divorce. (Vitals)
  • A heat wave kills 9 people in Canada and the United States. (The New York Times) (CNN) (BBC)

Armed conflicts and incidents

Law and politics

Business

Sport

Armed conflicts and incidents

  • A series of bombings over the three-day Shia pilgrimage to the mausoleum of Musa Kadhim in Iraq kill at least 70 and wound 300.
  • A fugitive rebel captain in the Philippines, Nicanor Faeldon, accused of participation in the Oakwood mutiny, turns himself in after three years. (Al Jazeera) (BBC News) (Philippine Inquirer)
  • A bomb rips through the engine and coach of a passenger train in Assam, India, killing one person. (Times of India) (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Politics

Law

Business and economics

  • Greece heads for a general strike after legislators raise the retirement age from 60 to 65. (The Sydney Morning Herald)
  • The IMF raises global economic growth forecast for this year from 4.2% to 4.6%. (BBC News) (Business Week)
  • Mozambique announces it will build a new bridge across the Zambezi to allow for a giant coal project in Tete Province. (Afrol News) (BBC News)

Science and weather

Sports

Other current events

Armed conflicts and incidents

Politics

Business and economics

Law and crime

Arts, culture and entertainment

  • A painting in a Johannesburg shopping centre depicting an autopsy on the corpse of Nelson Mandela surrounded by nosy world leaders attracts controversy as the topic of Mandela's eventual death is taboo in South Africa. (BBC)
  • Australia celebrates indigenous culture in NAIDOC Week with the 2010 theme "Unsung Heroes - Closing the Gap by Leading Their Way". (ABC)(NAIDOC)
  • Mel Gibson:
    • The American-born Australian actor is being called a "potential suspect" in a domestic violence investigation. (MSNBC) (IMDB)
    • An audio tape reportedly containing the voice of the actor surfaces online, with the actor allegedly making bigoted remarks against Latinos. (New York Daily News)
    • The actor is reportedly dropped by his talent agency. (Reuters)

Science

  • American researchers discover that some fruits and vegetables grown today have less nutritional value than those grown in the 1950s. (MSNBC)

Sport

  • 19-year-old French sprinter Christophe Lemaitre sets a national record of 9.98 seconds and becomes the first genetic European to run 100 metres in less than 10 seconds. (France24)

Arts, culture and entertainment

  • After more than a century in British collections, the head of Noongar leader Yagan is ceremonially buried on the 177th anniversary of his last full day of freedom. (ABC) (Perth Now) (The West-Yahoo!-7)

Business and economy

Law and crime

  • Gunman Raoul Moat shoots and kills himself after a 6-hour standoff with police, ending the largest manhunt in United Kingdom's recent history. (BBC News) (Daily Telegraph)

Politics and elections

Science

  • The Rosetta probe makes a flyby past the 21 Lutetia asteroid to gather scientific data. (BBC News)
  • BP is set to remove the containment cap over the destroyed Deepwater Horizon oil well in the Gulf of Mexico, and replace it with a bigger cap. Oil and gas will spew unrestricted from the well for an estimated four to seven days until the new cap is in place. (BBC News) (Al Jazeera)

Sports

Politics and elections

Armed conflicts and incidents

  • Ten Colombian soldiers are killed after entering a minefield while pursuing FARC rebels trying to blow up electrical towers. (The Jerusalem Post)
  • Two bomb attacks in the Ugandan capital Kampala kill at least 64 people; the Somali militant group Al-Shabab, which has pledged loyalty to al-qaida, is suspected of being behind the attack. (BBC News) (The Monitor) (AP) (Al Jazeera)

Law and crime

Arts

Science

Sport

Deepwater Horizon oil spill

  • A new cap on the destroyed oil well is put in place, and will undergo more than 2 days of testing. (AP via MSNBC)

Armed conflicts and incidents

Science and environment

  • Files indicate that GlaxoSmithKline knew Rosiglitazone (Avandia) had high heart risks since 1999, and made efforts to cover up the findings. (The New York Times)
  • The UK Ministry of Defence unveils Taranis, its new long-range unmanned plane intended to damage enemy territory. Tests are due to begin in 2011. (BBC) (CBS News) (The Scotsman) (The Sun)

Politics and elections

Law and crime

Arts and entertainment

  • Switzerland rejects a request from the United States to extradite FrancoPolish film director Roman Polanski to face sentencing on charges of unlawful sex with a minor in 1977. (The Daily Telegraph)
  • Two Russian men, Andrei Yerofeyev and Yuri Samodurov, are convicted of inciting hatred for setting up a Forbidden Art exhibition at the Sakharov Museum. (BBC) (The Independent)
  • Singer Jon Bon Jovi opts to continue with Bon Jovi's world concert tour despite tearing his calf muscle at the end of a concert in New Jersey. (Reuters)

Sport

Armed conflicts and attacks

  • 82 police officers are injured overnight in riots across Northern Ireland, sparked by the annual Orange march through Catholic neighborhoods. (BBC News)
  • A ship bound from Libya, the Al-Amal, due to deliver humanitarian aid from Algeria, Morocco and Nigeria to the Gaza Strip, changes course for Egypt after being warned to stay away by the Israeli Navy and receiving pressure from the United States to "act responsibly". (Aljazeera)
  • Pakistani embassy officials confirm missing Iranian nuclear scientist Shahram Amiri, who was reported to have been kidnapped by the United States Central Intelligence Agency, is taking refuge in the country's Washington, D.C. embassy. (Aljazeera)
  • Chile tests a package marked "anthrax" delivered to the country's foreign ministry. (Reuters)
  • Farmers in Gaza are shot at by Israeli militants as they attempt to harvest their crops. (Aljazeera)
  • Ugandan authorities arrest a number of people in connection with the July 2010 Kampala attacks which left at least 74 people dead. (Aljazeera)
  • An Afghan soldier attacks British soldiers as a base near Lashkar Gah, killing three (one a Nepalese citizen) and wounding four more, before defecting to the Taliban. (AP) (Aljazeera)

Arts, culture and entertainment

  • There is a row in the United States about privacy fears connected to an exchange in ownership of a gay teenagers' database. (BBC) (CNET News)
  • One death and three injuries result from a stampede during pulling of Ratha-Yatra chariots in Puri, India. (samaylive)
  • Los Angeles police in the United States review a recording of actor and director Mel Gibson allegedly verbally abusing his ex-girlfriend, Oksana Grigorieva. (BBC) (News24.com) (iAfrica)

Business and economy

Health

  • Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS figures demonstrate a fall by up to 25 per cent in the prevalence of HIV among young people aged between 15 and 24 in Africa. (BBC) (Reuters)
  • President of the United States Barack Obama unveils his country's first national strategy to cut HIV/AIDS infections and improve care for those with the disease. (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Law and crime

  • Six more New Orleans police officers are charged with: shooting dead two civilians, injuries caused to four other civilians, and conspiracy to cover up the incidents on a bridge in the aftermath of the deadly Hurricane Katrina in 2005. (BBC) (Reuters) (CBC News)
  • A Zimbabwe court frees human rights activist Farai Maguwu on bail after five weeks in detention, accused of providing false information about the diamond trade, charges he denies. (BBC) (IOL) (The Irish Times) (Mail & Guardian) (South Africa Mercury)
  • Human rights groups express concern that some of the soldiers due to march down the Champs Elysées in Paris tomorrow as part of the Bastille Day celebrations may be war criminals and write an open letter to President of France Nicolas Sarkozy. (France24)
  • The United Kingdom strips Russian spy Anna Chapman of her citizenship after the United States deports her. (Aljazeera) (BBC)
  • Colton Harris-Moore, otherwise known as the "Barefoot Bandit", pleads guilty to illegally landing a plane in The Bahamas, and currently faces jail or deportation. (CNN)
  • A four-year-old boy dies during an exorcism ritual carried out by a traditional healer in the Russian Far East. (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Politics and elections

Science & Weather

  • The Philippines' first typhoon of the year moves toward the country's eastern coast, with 33 of the country's 81 provinces and the capital Manila being placed under storm alert. (The Sydney Morning Herald)
  • The company behind the Green Dam Youth Escort internet filtering software in China has closed its operation, due to lack of funding. (Information Week)
  • 17 people die and a further 44 are missing in Chinese landslides. (The Irish Times)

Sports

Armed conflicts & attacks

Arts, culture & entertainment

Business & economics

Law & crime

Politics & elections

Science & weather

Sports

Armed conflicts and attacks

  • More than 20 people are killed and 100 injured in a suicide attack at a mosque in southeastern Iran. (BBC) (Press TV) (Aljazeera) (Arab News)
  • 40,000 people flee their homes and whole villages are burned to the ground in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. (BBC)
  • At least six people are killed and seventeen others receive wounds after a car bomb explodes in Tikrit in Iraq. (Aljazeera)
  • Jwani Mwaikusa, a senior Tanzanian defence lawyer at the United Nations-backed tribunal for Rwanda, is fatally shot outside his home in Dar es Salaam. His nephew and neighbour are also killed. (BBC)
  • President of Russia Dmitry Medvedev, speaking in Germany, says Russian investigators have identified the killer of human rights activist Natalya Estemirova and an "international search" is underway. (BBC) (France24) (iafrica)
  • A man claiming to be the killer of three British soldiers in Helmand contacts the BBC to say he was angered at what he described as the murder of civilians, including children, by British troops. (BBC)
  • Gunman Raoul Moat, who spent last week as a fugitive before being fatally cornered by UK police, repeatedly requested assistance from social workers and psychiatrists months before he committed murder but was ignored. (BBC) (ITN) (The Daily Telegraph)

Arts, culture and entertainment

International relations

Law and crime

Politics and elections

Science and weather

Sports

Armed conflicts and attacks

Arts, culture and entertainment

Business and economics

  • American company Goldman Sachs pays a record $550 million (US) fine to settle civil fraud charges. (Aljazeera)
  • Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen pledges the majority of his estimated $13.5 billion fortune to philanthropy after his death. (BBC) (The Daily Telegraph)

Disasters

  • A hotel fire in the northern Iraqi city of Sulaimaniya kills at least 29 people and injures another 21. (Xinhua) (Aljazeera) (Arab News)

Law and crime

  • Rwandan police arrest a business partner of opposition politician Andre Kagwa Rwisereka in connection with his recent murder. (BBC)
  • An American judge sentences a former State Department worker to life imprisonment without the possibility of parole and his wife to 6¾ years for spying for Cuba for three decades. (BBC) (Reuters) (Houston Chronicle) (Sky News)
  • Philip Alston expresses concern at the rise in murders in Ecuador and the declining number of murderers being caught. (BBC)
  • Three Chechens are charged by France in connection with a conspiracy to attack Russia; another man is released. (BBC)
  • Maria Jepsen, the world's first female Lutheran bishop, resigns due to her handling of an alleged case of sexual abuse. She is the third German bishop to resign in recent months. (BBC)
  • 800 gambling dens are raided in Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and China, (including Hong Kong and Macau) and 5,000 people arrested for illegal betting on the 2010 FIFA World Cup. (Aljazeera) (BBC News)

Politics

Science and weather

Sport

Armed conflicts and attacks

  • Dozens of English football fans clash with dogs and riot police in a busy shopping square in York, causing its closure. (BBC)
  • At least 50 automobiles sustain burns in Grenoble, France, as people protest the fatal shooting of a man by police. The man was shot during a chase following a robbery after firing on police. (BBC) (The Age) (Aljazeera) (The Daily Telegraph) (Reuters) (News24.com)
  • 300 JEM rebels and 86 Sudanese Army soldiers are killed in Darfur. (Aljazeera)
  • At least eight people are killed by machete-wielding attackers near Jos, Nigeria in scenes reminiscent of events earlier this year. (BBC) (Aljazeera)
  • South Korea develops a long-range cruise missile capable of striking North Korea, Japan, Russia and China. (WAtoday)
  • Suspected militants armed with assault rifles attack a bus in northwest Pakistan near the Afghanistan border, resulting in at least 16 casualties. (ABC Australia Online)
  • Thousands of mourners gather in Zahedan for a mass funeral for those killed in recent bombings; Iranian officials indicate that they believe the West carried out the atrocities. (The Age) (BBC)
  • The Mexican military says Thursday's attack in Ciudad Juárez was a car bomb. (Aljazeera)

Arts, culture and entertainment

Business and economy

  • British tour operator Goldtrail collapses, stranding thousands of holidaymakers abroad. (BBC) (The Age)

Disasters

  • Israeli settlements dump untreated chemical waste directly into a sewage canal that runs through agricultural land in the West Bank, giving Palestinians skin and respiratory illnesses. (Aljazeera)
  • Typhoon Conson makes landfall near Hai Phong, Vietnam, after devastating Southern China and the Philippines with at least 65 dead. (JTWC) (NDCC)
  • One month after Israel's announcement it was easing its Gazan blockade the humanitarian situation remains dire. (Sky News)
  • More than 2,000 firefighters fight a fire at the port of Dalian after two oil pipelines explode. (WAtoday) (BBC)
  • Greece experiences its first forest fires of the summer season. (WAtoday)
  • Twenty-eight coal miners die after a fire in their mine near Hancheng City in China's Shaanxi Province. (CRI English)

International relations

Law and crime

  • German minister Ilse Aigner expresses annoyance at Facebook's privacy policy, saying the website is breaking the law by collecting information such as phone numbers. (The Age)
  • Bangladeshi police arrest an army major who allegedly possessed hundreds of bottles of Phensedyl, an illegal cough syrup. (BBC)
  • Hugo Chávez exhumes the corpse of Simón Bolívar to investigate suspicions of foul play being involved in his death. (WAtoday)

Politics and elections

Science and weather

Sports

Armed conflicts and attacks

Arts, culture and entertainment

Disasters

International relations

Law and crime

Politics and elections

Science and weather

  • Rhinoceros experts worry after the last female in the Krugersdorp game reserve near Johannesburg is attacked by helicopter, shot with tranquiliser guns, and has her horn hacked off by poachers, slowly bleeding to death. (The Observer)

Sports

Armed conflicts and attacks

Arts, culture and entertainment

Business and economics

  • China surpasses the United States to become world's biggest energy consumer, consuming about 4% more than the U.S. (Washington Post)

Disasters

International Relations

Law and crime

  • A two-year "Top Secret America" investigation by The Washington Post concludes that United States intelligence gathering has grown so much since the September 11 attacks that neither its true cost, size nor effectiveness in keeping the country safe is actually known. (BBC) (Aljazeera)
  • A former British Army commanding officer is accused of lying to a public inquiry into the death of Baha Mousa, an Iraqi civilian in his soldiers' custody. (BBC)
  • Kenyan pastor John Kamau Mbugua pleads not guilty to two charges over an alleged plot to bomb a campaign rally for next month's constitutional referendum. (BBC)
  • Taysir Hayb, the Israeli soldier who shot and killed British volunteer Tom Hurndall, is to be released next month after an Army committee headed by Advocate General Avichai Mandelblit decides to shorten his sentence. (Haaretz)
  • 196 people are indicted in Istanbul for plotting to overthrow the government. (BBC) (Reuters) (The Guardian) (The News international) (People's Daily) (The Sydney Morning Herald)
  • Hundreds of Italians commemorate anti-Mafia judge Paolo Borsellino in Palermo, 18 years after he was killed by a car bomb. (BBC)
  • Syria bans the full face veil from being worn in its universities. (BBC) (Oneindia)
  • Authorities at Mexico City International Airport arrest a man who had flown from Lima and was attempting to smuggle 18 little monkeys into the country inside items of clothing. (BBC) (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Politics

Science and weather

Armed conflicts and incidents

Arts and entertainment

Business and economics

Disasters

International relations

Law and crime

Politics

Science and weather

Sport

Armed conflicts and incidents

  • Turkey – Kurdistan Workers' Party conflict:
    • Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) leader Murat Karayilan says the group would disarm under the supervision of the United Nations in return for an end to attacks on Kurdish civilians and arrests of Kurdish politicians in eastern Turkey, as well as additional linguistic and cultural rights. (BBC)
    • Suspected PKK militants blow up an oil pipeline carrying oil from Iran. (Hurriyet) (UPI) (Times of India)
  • Unidentified gunmen on motorcycles fatally shoot Indian civil rights campaigner and environmentalist Amit Jethwa in Ahmedabad, Gujarat. (BBC)
  • At least 30 people are killed and 46 others are wounded, including women and children, as a car bomb explodes near a Shia mosque in Abu Sayeeda, Baqubah, Diyala in Iraq. (Aljazeera)
  • At least 34 people are killed in clashes in northern Yemen between Houthi rebels and pro-government tribes. (Al Jazeera) (BBC)
  • The United States threatens to impose new sanctions on North Korea as part of its attempt to halt perceived nuclear weapons ambitions; North Korea describes United States military exercises in the Sea of Japan as "very dangerous sabre-rattling". (Aljazeera)
  • Assailants launch an attack on a hydroelectric plant in Kabardino-Balkaria in southern Russia killing two guards and letting off bombs. (Canadian Press via Google News) (Al Jazeera) (RIA Novosti)
  • Four people are killed and many more are injured by police fire in Assam in India during a protest by thousands against government registration. (BBC)
  • Three plainclothes Chinese police officers beat up, bruise and concuss a provincial official's wife by accident; the police are punished, while the woman is hospitalised. (BBC) (China Daily) (The Daily Telegraph) (Reuters) (News24)
  • Three policemen are killed by suspected left-wing extremists in Pabna, Bangladesh. (BBC)
  • Two Palestinian militants of the Islamic Jihad Movement in Palestine are killed and another six wounded by Israeli shelling as they approached the Gaza Strip-Israel border near Beit Hanoun. A ten-year-old girl is also wounded. (Haaretz) (The Guardian) (BBC) (The Sydney Morning Herald)

Arts and culture

Business and economics

Disasters

  • The United Nations requests more aid to avoid a humanitarian catastrophe in the Sahel. (Al Jazeera)
  • The death toll from floods in China, the worst in a decade, rises to 700. (Xinhua) (Sify)

International relations

Law and crime

Politics

Science

  • Scientists investigate the deaths of approximately 500 penguins whose corpses washed up on Brazilian beaches. (BBC)
  • Scientists announce the discovery of R136a1, the most massive star ever found. (BBC) (Aljazeera)

Sport

  • Hockey India investigates after M. K. Kaushik, 1980 Olympic gold medalist and coach of the women's team, allegedly sexually harasses a squad member; he denies the allegation but temporarily resigns pending the outcome of the investigation. (BBC News) (The Hindu) (The Daily Telegraph) (The Sydney Morning Herald) (NDTV)

Armed conflicts and incidents

Arts and culture

Business and economics

  • The International Monetary Fund cancels Haiti's $268 million debt and approves a new three-year loan worth $60 million; the IMF expects Haiti to start paying back interest in late 2011. (Aljazeera)
  • A proposal to develop nuclear energy is discussed at an energy policy meeting held by Asean in Da Lat, Vietnam. (BBC)

Disasters

International relations

Law and crime

Politics

Science

Sports

Armed conflicts and incidents

Arts and culture

Disasters

International relations

Law and crime

Politics

Science

  • President of Iran Mahmoud Ahmadinejad announces plans to launch a manned shuttle into space by 2019. (BBC) (Press TV) (The Straits Times)
  • The Indian government unveils a solar power touch-screen laptop, cheaper than America's iPad, expected to be on sale next year. (BBC) (The Guardian) (The Independent) (The Jakarta Post)

Sport

Armed conflicts and incidents

  • The United States and South Korea begin showing off their navy and air force by maneuvering dozens of ships and planes and thousands of troops in the Sea of Japan with intent to "rattle" North Korea. (BBC)
  • The Royal Air Force tests fighter jets with which it intends to use to shoot down any rogue passenger planes. (BBC)
  • A mass grave containing at least 50 tortured and burned corpses is unearthed east of Monterrey, Nuevo León, in Mexico. (BBC)
  • France states its joint effort with Mauritania to free a French hostage is over, but no word is released on the whereabouts of the hostage or if he is even still alive. (Aljazeera)

Arts, culture and society

Disasters

  • More than half of Peru enters a state of emergency due to unusually cold weather. (BBC)
  • Chinese floods:
  • BP announces it is to start drilling for oil off Libya. (BBC) (France24) (The Sydney Morning Herald) (The Age)
  • The Lake Delhi Dam fails along the Maquoketa River in the U.S. state of Iowa. (CBS News)

Law and crime

Politics

Science

  • Iran begins researching the development of an, as yet, non-existent nuclear fusion reactor. (BBC)

Sport

  • Snooker's "first television superstar" and two-times world champion Alex Higgins dies at the age of 61. (BBC) (The Daily Telegraph) (The Guardian) (The New Zealand Herald) (RTÉ) (Hindustan Times)

Armed conflicts and incidents

  • 1 person is killed and at least 10 are injured after a bombing at a bus stop in Bangkok following a parliamentary by-election. (Aljazeera) (Channel 4) (Bangkok Post)
  • The Al-Qaeda Organization in the Islamic Maghreb announces it has killed a French hostage in Mali after a failed rescue attempt by French and Mauritanian troops. (BBC) (Aljazeera)
  • There are reports that an airstrike on a village in Helmand Province has killed 45 civilians, including children, who were sheltering from violence. (BBC)

Disasters

Economics

Politics

Sport

Armed conflicts and incidents

Disasters

Law and crime

Politics

Science

Sports

Armed conflict and attacks

Arts and culture

Business and economics

Disasters

Law and crime

Politics

Science

Sport

Armed conflict and attacks

Disasters

International relations

  • During a visit to India, British Prime Minister David Cameron warns Pakistan not to have any relationship with groups that "promote the export of terror". (BBC) (Indian Express)

Law and crime

Politics and elections

Armed conflict and attacks

Arts and culture

Business and economics

Disasters

International relations

Law and crime

Politics and elections

Science

Armed conflict and attacks

Arts, culture and entertainment

Disasters

Law and crime

Politics and elections

Science

Arts and entertainment

Business and economy

Disasters

Law and crime

International relations

  • Pakistani intelligence officials cancel a planned visit to the United Kingdom after British Prime Minister David Cameron warned Pakistan to avoid links with groups that "promote the export of terror". However, a visit by President Asif Ali Zardari will go ahead. (BBC)

Politics and elections

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References

  1. ^ "Kosovo independence declaration deemed legal". Reuters. 23 July 2010. Retrieved 29 September 2012. 
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