Portal:Current events/January 2011

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January 2011 was the first month of that common year. The month, which began on a Saturday, ended on a Monday after 31 days.

International holidays

(See Holidays and observances, on sidebar at right, below)

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from January 2011.

Armed conflicts and attacks
  • A bomb explodes outside a Coptic church in Alexandria, Egypt, killing at least 21 people and wounding 97 more; street disturbances between Christians and Muslims ensue. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • Specialist prison guards and firefighters are sent into Ford Open Prison in West Sussex, United Kingdom, after 40 inmates started a riot. Part of the prison has been destroyed by fire. (BBC)
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • International mediators propose the establishment of a regional authority for Darfur, as a compromise between the Sudanese government and rebels’ demands, in a diplomatic effort to respond to Sudanese President Bashir’s order last week to withdraw the Sudanese government delegation from talks in Doha. (Radio Dabanga)
  • Egyptian police shoot and kill an African illegal immigrant outside the Israeli border. (Ha'aretz)
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • A 7.1-magnitude earthquake streaks southern Chile, having its epicenter 96 km northwest of Temuco, not far from the location of the 2010 Chile earthquake. (CNN) (CBC) (Radio Australia News)
  • River levels in Queensland, Australia continue to rise, affecting about 200,000 people and killing at least one person. (CTV) (Aljazeera)
  • Flooding occurs along the San Antonio River in Monterey County, California as flooding from previous weeks subsides. (Contra Costa Times) (North County Times)
  • Ten people are crushed to death in a bar packed with New Year's revelers in Ipelegeng, South Africa. (CNN)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • Investments in Facebook totaling US$500 million lead to speculation that its value could be as high as US$50 billion. (CNN)
Disasters and accidents
  • Floods in Queensland, Australia:
    • The Australian government announces that it will make relief payments of hundreds of millions of dollars for flood victims.(The Australian)
    • The death toll from the floods rises to 10. (Adelaide Now)
  • 7 people are missing after a fishing boat sank in the Xi River in south China. (Straits Times)
  • Two boats capsize off the southern coast of Yemen with a total of 80 people missing. Only three have been found alive. (BBC) (IOL) (Press TV)
  • A six-alarm fire destroys a former hotel built in 1888 and recognized as a heritage building on Toronto's Yonge Street before it was scheduled for demolition; the fire forced the temporary closure of Ryerson University and nearby schools and hot spots remained a danger after extinguishing the fire. Two firefighters who fell into the building were rescued uninjured while arson remains a suspected cause. (CBC) (Toronto Sun)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Science and technology
  • Scientists are investigating the sudden dieoff of over 5,000 red-winged blackbirds in Beebe, Arkansas, United States, on New Year's Eve. (CNN.com)
    • In another event not far way from the bird dieoff, scientists are investigating a fish kill of nearly 100,000 drum in the Arkansas River. (USA Today)
  • China announces a breakthrough in spent nuclear fuel reprocessing technology that could solve the country's uranium supply problem. (China Daily) (BBC)
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • Russia begins an operation to free 500 people stranded in ships by ice in the Sea of Okhotsk. (BBC)
  • More evacuations take place in Queensland, Australia, as flood waters continued to rise and the Australian prime minister says damages could amount to hundreds of millions of dollars. (CNN)
Law and crime
Politics
Science and technology
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Iran and India develop a stop-gap plan to continue the flow of oil from the former to the latter, and payments in the opposite direction, days after India withdrew from the Asian Clearing Union. The new plan involves payments through the EIH Bank, in Hamburg, Germany. (Domain-b)
Law and crime
  • A 17-year-old student at Millard South High School, in Omaha, Nebraska, shoots an assistant principal to death and wounds the school principal before turning the gun onto himself. (CNN)
  • A Malaysian coroner records an open verdict in the death of opposition aide Teoh Beng Hock, who fell from the roof of the anti-corruption commission building in July 2009. (BBC) (Malaysia Star)
  • Police investigating the murder of Joanna Yeates make a fresh appeal for information, saying that when discovered, her fully clothed body was missing a sock which may hold important clues. (BBC)
  • In the UK 33 people are convicted for their part in an £80m drugs and money laundering operation. They include Simon Ford, a firefighter commended for his actions during the 7 July London bombings. (BBC)
Politics
Sports
Bird Deaths
  • There were 3 fairly significant mass bird death events in Italy, Sweden and Romania. (Wiki)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • A French market regulator approves a takeover defense adopted by the Hermès family, who own the manufacturer of Birkin and Kelly handbags. This improves the odds that Hermès will preserve its independence in the face of a bid by LVMH. (Reuters)
Disasters and accidents
  • 22 people are killed after a bus falls into a gorge in Uttarakhand, northern India. (NDTV) (Straits Times)
International relations
  • The United States protests strongly to Vietnam after a U.S. diplomat is attacked and injured by Vietnamese police when he went to visit a detained religious dissident.(RFA)
  • South Korea dismisses an offer of unconditional talks by North Korea, saying the offer was part of a propaganda campaign. (Reuters)
  • A U.S. plan to force gun dealers in states which border Mexico to report cases where individuals bought multiple high-powered rifles in under 5 days, is stalled due to opposition from gun lobbies. Approximately 90% of crime guns seized in Mexico originate in the U.S., and over 30,000 people have died in Mexico due to drug cartel violence since 2006. (Reuters)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • A suicide bomber kills 17 people and wounds at least 20 others in a public bathhouse in Kandahar province, Afghanistan; the Taliban claims responsibility for the attack. (The Washington Post) (AP via Google News)
  • Seven people are killed in Jos and at least two people are killed at a rally in Bayelsa State. (Al Jazeera)
  • Eight people are killed and three injured following an armed attack on a bus traveling between Catacamas and Juticalpa in eastern Honduras. (CNN) (The Jerusalem Post)
  • Six people are killed and 20 injured in political violence in West Bengal, India. (Hindustan Times)
  • South Korea lowers its surveillance alert level against North Korea. (Xinhua)
  • Israeli troops round up five men and kill a 67-year-old Palestinian man during an operation into the West Bank, aiming at arresting members of Hamas. (Haaretz) (BBC) (The Jerusalem Post)
Business and economy
  • The Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts upholds a lower court ruling that halted the efforts of two large banks to foreclose in cases in which they failed to prove they were holding the mortgages in question. (Reuters) (The New York Times).
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
  • The United Nations says thousands of people are arriving in Southern Sudan from north Sudan ahead of the independence referendum on Sunday. (Al Jazeera)
  • Parents in China demand compensation after more than 200 children are poisoned by lead. (Reuters)
  • Youths in Algeria riot for a second night in unrest over social and political grievances. (BBC) (Al Jazeera) (Africa News)
  • Youths in Tunisia protest for several days over social (job market, purchase power, goods' price) and political grievances. Lawyers go on strike against police repression of protesters. (The Irish Times)
Sports
Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • 2010–2011 Tunisian protests: At least one person is killed and others are injured in the town of Tala during the latest protests against unemployment and poor living conditions. (Al Jazeera)
  • Algerian protests against food prices and unemployment:
    • Government taxes and duties on sugar and cooking oil in Algeria are lowered in response to three days of unrest over increases in unemployment and the cost of living. (Al Jazeera)
    • Two people are killed and hundreds of others are injured during the protests. (Yemen News Agency) (BBC)
Disasters and accidents
  • Freezing temperatures in northern India kill at least 22 people. (AP via Google News) (Sify India)
International relations
Law and crime
  • Chinese prosecutors say more than 600 people were killed over a period of seven years in Yunnan due to official misconduct. (Zee News) (The Straits Times)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • The mother of a woman who died in her home during a demonstration against Israel's separation barrier in Bil'in says she died from inhaling massive quantities of tear gas; the Israeli army says she did not die of tear gas inhalation. (The Observer)(The Jerusalem Post)
  • Aftermath of the 2011 Tucson shooting:
    • Officials investigating the shooting, who were seeking a second person of interest, have cleared the other person of involvement in the shooting. (CNN)
    • Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro, known for frequently disagreeing with the United States, condemns the shooting as "atrocious", "absurd" and "unjustifiable". (AP via Fox News)
    • American politician Sarah Palin is criticised for targeting the shot Gabrielle Giffords electoral district with crosshairs on her website along with 19 other rivals before the attack. (The Guardian)
Arts and culture
  • Teachers and cultural figures criticise as "foolhardy" the British government's abolition of a scheme intended to improve teaching of the arts in schools. (The Observer)
  • Viewers of UK soap opera EastEnders complain in record numbers about a "hurtful", "unrealistic" and "exploitative" cot death storyline as the BBC sets out to meet the grieving mothers it has upset. (The Independent) (The Observer)
  • A Border Collie is reported to have learned 1022 words, and acts consequently to human citation of those words. (Physorg.com) (Discovery.com)
Business and economics
  • The Algerian government cuts food prices amid unrest, and vows to punish those responsible for rioting in recent days. (Al Jazeera)
  • 2010–2011 Tunisian protests: Unrest in Tunisia over youth unemployment continues, with several deaths reported. (Al Jazeera)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
  • Israeli demolition of the historic Shepherd Hotel:
    • Israeli bulldozers begin demolishing a 1930s East Jerusalem hotel to build 20 new settler homes, "destroying all the US efforts and ending any possibility of a return to negotiations" according to a spokesperson for Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. (BBC) (AP via Fox News)
    • Hillary Clinton calls Israel's demolition of the hotel a "disturbing development" which undermines peace efforts. (Xinhua)
  • The U.S. ambassador to Iceland is summoned in relation to secret United States attempts to access private details concerning Icelandic MP Birgitta Jónsdóttir. The matter is described as "very serious". (AP via Google News)
  • Hillary Clinton of the United States speaks out against Iran in Abu Dhabi during a five-day trip to the United Arab Emirates, Oman and Qatar. She requests that the world increase its pressure on Iran, a country she considers "a serious concern". (Al Jazeera)
  • Demonstrators gather outside the Iranian Embassy in London to protest against an attack on Iranian exiles in Iraq, an attack reportedly ordered by Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. (BBC)
  • United States Secretary of Defense Robert Gates flies to China for a four-day trip after expressing American worries that the Chinese "clearly have potential to put some of our [military] capabilities at risk", adding that America has "to pay attention to them" and "respond appropriately with our own programmes". (BBC)
  • Chinese Vice Premier Li Keqiang begins a four-day visit to the UK; Scotland and China sign a green energy deal. (BBC)
Law and crime
  • An investigation by The Guardian newspaper reveals details of how Metropolitan police officer Mark Kennedy infiltrated dozens of protest groups in 22 countries using the pseudonym Mark Stone. (The Guardian)
  • Prosecutors in the U.K. drop the case against members of a group who were planning to forcefully shut down the coal based Ratcliffe-on-Soar power station temporarily, after the undercover officer, an alleged provocateur in the group, offers to give evidence in support of the activists. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
  • Iranian human-rights lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh is sentenced to 11 years in prison and banned from practicing law or traveling for 20 years; France condemns the punishment as "deeply shocking" and called for the release of Sotoudeh and another activist, Shiva Nazar-Ahari, who was sentenced to four years in prison and 74 lashes. (Los Angeles Times) (The New York Times) (Reuters)
  • Interpol places 47 Saudis on its most-wanted list after Saudi Arabia accuses them of involvement in the Al-Qaeda terror network. (The Washington Post) (Sify)(The Jerusalem Post)
Politics
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2010–2011 Tunisian protests:
    • Fresh protests break out in Tunisia, in the capital Tunis. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
    • Up to 50 people are killed following protests against rising unemployment in Tunisia. (AFP via SBS)
  • Assassination of Masoud Alimohammadi:
    • The Iranian government says an Israeli spying network - since dismantled - assassinated the University of Tehran's distinguished professor of elementary particle physics Masoud Alimohammadi; an Iranian foreign ministry spokesperson vows to sue. (Xinhua)
    • The apparent confession of Majid Jamali-Fash is broadcast on television; he says he was hired and trained by Israel before being sent to kill Alimohammadi in Iran. (The Guardian)
  • Lawyers for Julian Assange warn that he could be killed if he is extradited to the U.S. from Britain; Assange draws parallels between the rhetoric of the 2011 Tucson shooting and the language used against him by commentators such as Joe Biden, U.S. Vice President. (AFP)
  • One person is killed and seven injured by a gunman on a train in Egypt. (BBC)
  • Three Georgian Army soldiers are killed and 13 wounded when a mortar bomb explodes during exercises at a military base near Tbilisi, Georgia. (Reuters)
  • At least five people are killed in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, as clashes continue between police and supporters of presidential aspirant Alassane Ouattara. (CNN)
  • An Israeli missile attack kills a Palestinian militant while he was riding a motorcycle in the Gaza Strip.(Reuters)
  • 18 people are killed by attackers armed with machetes in the villages of Wareng and Bardin Laki in Central Nigeria. (Reuters)
Disasters
International relations
  • An official investigation in Kyrgzstan into deadly ethnic riots last year reports that local Uzbek leaders were to blame. (BBC) (24.kg News Agency)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Armed conflict and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
  • Australian floods
    • The floods in Queensland, Australia, worsen further with 20,000 properties in the capital Brisbane expected to be flooded and 4,000 homes flooded in the nearby city of Ipswich. (ABC News Australia)
    • The death toll from the floods reaches at least 12 with at least 67 people missing. (News Limited)
  • At least 18 people are killed and one million are made homeless following flooding in Sri Lanka. (Sify India)
  • Floods in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, kill more than 250 people. (BBC) (Reuters)
  • Haitians commemorate the first anniversary of the 2010 earthquake. (AP via Yahoo! News)
International relations
Politics
Science and medicine
  • The World Health Organization launches a plan to prevent the global spread of an artemisinin-resistant malaria. (Reuters)
  • NASA GISS data shows that global temperatures in 2010 were tied with 2005 for the warmest year on record. (GISS Research News) (The Associated Press) (PR Newswire)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Protests in Tunisia:
    • At least six people are killed in further clashes: three in Menzel Bourguiba, one in Bizerte and one in Tataouine. (Al Jazeera)
    • President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali gives a televised address during which he attempts to appease protesters by vowing not to seek re-election in 2014. He also promises an end to live firing of "real bullets": three more people are killed in the Tunis suburb of Aouina less than an hour later. (Al Jazeera) (BBC) (The Guardian)
  • Forces loyal to incumbent Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo attack and burn United Nations vehicles. (Reuters) (Al Jazeera)
  • A British cruise ship avoids a possible Somali pirate attack 100 miles (160 km) off the coast of Tanzania in the Indian Ocean. (CNN)
  • Israeli–Lebanese conflict:
    • Israel places troops stationed in northern Israel on high alert following the collapse of the Lebanese government. (Haaretz)
    • The Israeli army returns Lebanese shepherd Charbel Tanious Khoury, whom it abducted on Wednesday when he crossed the blue line and entered Israeli territory, after interrogating him. He is the third Lebanese shepherd to be captured by Israel in the past year. Israel conducts 14 surveillance flights over Lebanese territory. (The Daily Star) (AFP via Google News) (Press TV) ("Haaretz")
Business and economy
  • Executives of the troubled U.S. book retailer Borders meet with publishers to appeal for financing. (TheStreet.com)
  • United States banks foreclose on a record one million mortgages in 2010. (ABC News Australia)
  • China is reported to have the highest wind power capacity after adding 16GW in 2010, bringing its total to 41.8GW, with the U.S. in second with 40.2GW installed.(Reuters)
  • The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency revokes a permit for a proposed coal mine in West Virginia which would have been one of America's largest citing "destructive and unsustainable mining practices that jeopardize the health of Appalachian communities and clean water". (Reuters)
  • Major credit rating agencies Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s warn the U.S. that its increasing national debt may lead to a lowering of the nation's credit rating.(New York Times)
Disasters
  • Floods in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil:
    • The death toll continues to rise, with over 500 confirmed casualties.(AFP via Sydney Morning Herald)
    • President Dilma Rousseff announces a R$ 780 million ($466.2 million) emergency relief budget for the areas affected. (The Telegraph)
  • Floods in Queensland, Australia:
    • Flood waters peak in Brisbane, Australia, missing historic levels but still threatening thousands of homes. (Dow Jones via Wall Street Journal)
    • The death toll reaches at least 15 and is expected to rise as search and rescue efforts continue. (The Australian), (3AW), (ABC News)
  • More than one million people are affected by flooding in Sri Lanka, with 21 dead and 270,000 made homeless. (The Hindu)
  • 10 people are killed in a hotel fire in Hunan, China. (UPI) (Shanghai Daily)
  • Three people drown and six are missing after a boat taking people home from an engagement ceremony capsized in northern Vietnam. (The Straits Times)
  • A tanker carrying sulfuric acid capsizes in the Rhine River in Germany with two crew members missing. (Deutsche Welle)
International relations
  • Tajikistan's lower house of parliament ratifies an agreement to turn over 380 square miles (approx. 1,000 square kilometers) of territory to the People's Republic of China, ending a century-old conflict over disputed territory. (Jerusalem Post) (Press TV) (BBC)
  • Prime Minister of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdoğan responds to Avigdor Liberman's recent controversial comments about Turkey by advising Israel to replace him with another person in his role as foreign minister. Editorials in right and left-wing Israeli newspapers also call for Liberman to be sacked after his comments offended Israel's Turkish counterparts. (The Daily Telegraph) (Al Jazeera)
Law and crime
  • The WikiLeaks website honours a pledge made in July by offering financial aid to the legal team of Bradley Manning, a soldier accused by the United States of providing secret U.S. embassy cables for international public consumption. (The Guardian)
  • A German pornographer is sentenced to four years imprisonment in Somaliland. (BBC)
Politics
Science and medicine
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Thousands of people march through the cities of Amman, Ma'an, Karak, Salt and Irbidin and other parts of Jordan, objecting to the government's inability to stop poverty and increased living costs. Prime Minister Samir Rifai, described as a "coward", is asked to resign. (Al Jazeera) (Press TV) (AFP via Google News) (Reuters Africa)
  • British-based global oil and gas company BP signs a deal with Russian oil firm Rosneft to exploit potentially huge deposits of oil and gas in Russia's Arctic shelf. (BBC)
  • Amnesty International criticises the British government for spending nearly £1 billion on 30 Watchkeeper WK450 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) which Israel's military allegedly "field-tested on Palestinians" during the Gaza War. (Sky News)
Disasters and accidents
  • More than 100 pilgrims are killed in an evening stampede at Sabarimala. (The Daily Telegraph) (Times of India)
  • January 2011 Rio de Janeiro floods and mudslides:
    • The disaster is declared Brazil's worst ever as the death toll exceeds 500, with additional people missing and more fatalities expected. (AFP via Yahoo! News) (Al Jazeera) (Vancouver Sun)
    • Rescue work is carried out to attempt to locate survivors in remote areas of south-eastern Brazil. (BBC)
    • The death toll reaches 537. (Al Jazeera) (Xinhua)
  • Australian floods:
    • Brisbane cleans its mud and debris which was left behind during recent flooding there. (BBC)
    • Several rivers flood in the southern state of Victoria, including in the capital Melbourne. (NineMSN)
  • Heavy rains hamper rescue efforts in Sri Lanka following flooding and mudslides that have killed at least 27 people. (AFP)
  • New Caledonia and its Loyalty Islands are simultaneously struck by a 7.0 earthquake and Tropical Cyclone Vania. (eTN)
International relations
  • Israel's Press Office apologises for what The Jerusalem Post dubbed "Bra-Gate" - the security screening of several international journalists forced to remove their underwear and denial of entry to Al Jazeera producer Najwan Simri Diab after she refused to remove her bra. Najwan Simri Diab says she did not wish for an apology, only to be assured that it won't happen again. (Sify) (The Jerusalem Post) (Ynetnews) (Al Jazeera)
  • Veteran Irish Labour Party TD Michael D. Higgins demands that the British government explain why one of Britain's undercover policemen was operating on Republic of Ireland territory on May Day 2004, as the European Union expanded to the east. Higgins compares it to illegal activities carried out by British state agents in the same country during the 1970s. (The Guardian)
  • A closed-door briefing occurs at New York City's United Nations building. Behind it around 150 non-American diplomats object to the American government about a decision by the country's banks to end services for diplomatic missions, with some diplomats suggesting the UN budget could be affected. (BBC)
  • Guyana formally recognizes Palestine as an independent state as part of its "long-standing and unwavering solidarity with, and commitment to, the just and legitimate aspirations of the people of Palestine for the exercise of their right to self-determination and to achieve a homeland of their own, independent, free, prosperous and at peace", a foreign ministry statement says. (Al Jazeera)
  • South Africa's chief rabbi Warren Goldstein criticises a controversial petition launched by three Jewish Capetonians calling for Archbishop Emeritus and Nobel Peace laureate Desmond Tutu to be axed as patron of two Holocaust centers. (IOL)
  • The Obama administration in the United States eases travel and other restrictions on Cuba. (ABC News)
Law and crime
  • The United States Treasury Department says "no" to calls by enraged American politicians to have Julian Assange and the WikiLeaks website added to its economic blacklist or sanctions list like so-called "terrorist groups". The Treasury Department cites a lack of "evidence at this time". (CBS News)
  • A military court in Rwanda sentences four former top officials who were allies of President Paul Kagame to long prison sentences in absentia. (BBC)
  • Prime Minister of Italy Silvio Berlusconi is summoned to a prostitution investigation to deal with allegations of "improperly assisting" 17-year-old nightclub dancer he had at one of his private parties. (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian)
  • A court in America sentences Abdel Nur of Guyana to 15 years imprisonment after charging him with participation in a plot to blow up fuel tanks at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. (BBC)
  • 2 British footballers are questioned in relation to allegations resulting from a sex assault at a party. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2010–2011 Tunisian protests:
    • Former President of Tunisia Zine El Abidine Ben Ali flees with his family to Saudi Arabia, after being rejected by France. (BBC)
    • Saudi Arabia confirms it is welcoming ousted Zine El Abidine Ben Ali and his family into the kingdom due to "exceptional circumstances" in Tunisia; people in Saudi Arabia and people elsewhere criticise the decision to offer sanctuary to "the dictator" on the Internet. (Al Jazeera)
    • At least 42 people are killed during one fire in the city of Monastir in the central east of the country, the current deadliest single incident of the month-long protests. (Ennahar) (Ynetnews) (Reuters) (Al Jazeera)
    • Imed Trabelsi, a wealthy nephew-in-law of ousted President of Tunisia Zine El Abidine Ben Ali who was "elected" mayor of La Goulette, is slain. (ABS-CBN News and Current Affairs)
    • Tunisia gets another new Acting President, its second in two days, as 78-year-old speaker of parliament Fouad Mebazaa is sworn in. He claims all Tunisians "without exception" are now to be allowed participate in national politics. (Oneindia) (BBC)
    • Members of the Tunisian Armed Forces are stationed in the centre of Tunis following outbreaks of random shootings. (Reuters)
    • A night curfew is back in force in Tunisia. (ABC News)
    • International response to events in Tunisia:
      • Jordanians echo events in Tunisia by staging their own protests against soaring food prices. (The Guardian)
      • Libyan leader Muammar al-Gaddafi describes himself as "very pained" by events in the neighbouring country. (Reuters Africa)
      • Tunisian communities across Canada rally in support of the uprising that ousted President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali yesterday. (Toronto Star)
  • A US marine shoots and kills an Afghan police officer after the officer advanced on him with his weapon raised. (Reuters)
  • An Iraqi soldier opens fire on U.S. troops at a training centre, killing two and injuring another before being killed himself.(Reuters)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
  • Brazilian soldiers arrive in Teresópolis as the death toll from floods and mudslides during Brazil's deadliest disaster passes 600. (BBC) (Al Jazeera) (Xinhua)
  • The United Nations seeks emergency aid for Sri Lanka: as many as 390,000 people are made homeless and thousands of houses are destroyed in the disaster there. (The Guardian)
  • The South Africa government is to declare parts disaster areas: 40 people have died in floods. (BBC)
  • 13,000 properties in rural Victoria in Australia are flooded. (ABC News Australia)
International relations
  • British police undercover spy ring operating across Europe:
    • Veteran Labour Party TD Michael D. Higgins writes to the Irish Department of Justice regarding the activities of undercover British police officer Mark Kennedy, who infiltrated protest movements across Europe, including several on Republic of Ireland territory. He describes it as "of grave concern" and that "this type of activity undermines respect for the law and it is very sinister in that it can damage good causes." (The Irish Times)
    • A third British police spy is identified as the revelations continue. This one, a 44-year-old male officer, infiltrated a group in Cardiff, Wales. (The Guardian)
  • Iranian diplomatic tour and medical discovery:
  • The Southern Sudanese independence referendum, 2011 ends. (Al Jazeera)
Politics
  • French Health Minister Xavier Bertrand vows to revamp France's medical regulatory system after an official report said the diabetes drug Mediator, which killed 2,000 people, should have been banned 10 years earlier. (BBC)
  • China may station troops in North Korea to protect its investment projects and citizens.(Yahoo News)(Press TV)
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2010–2011 Tunisian protests:
    • Ali Seriati, the former head of presidential security, is arrested and accused of threatening state security by fomenting violence. (BBC)
    • Gunfire is heard in the capital Tunis as political leaders attempt to form a new government. (Al Jazeera)
  • Southern Sudanese leader Salva Kiir calls on the people of South Sudan to forgive the north for killings during the civil war. (BBC) (AFP)
  • The online edition of The New York Times reports that U.S. and Israeli intelligence services collaborated in the development of the destructive computer worm Stuxnet to record Iranian operations and send them spinning out of control ahead of a sabotage attack against Iran. Testing is reported to have occurred at the heavily guarded Dimona complex in the Negev desert in Israel. (The New York Times)
  • Nine civilians are killed in Baghlan, Afghanistan on their way to a wedding when they were blown up: 6 civilians are killed and 3 civilians are injured in Helmand after a minibus and a bomb collide. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
Arts and culture
Disasters
  • A ship carrying 263 migrants sinks off the coast of Greece; 22 are missing. (AP)
  • Further landslides and more rain are feared in Brazil which is dealing with the worst disaster in its history. (Al Jazeera)
  • Three people are killed in a stampede at a three-storey nightclub in the Hungarian capital Budapest. (BBC)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • An explosion destroys a bus in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan, killing 18. (The Guardian)
  • A partial curfew is imposed in parts of Karachi, Pakistan, aimed at ending a surge in ethnic and political violence that has claimed 29 lives in the past four days. 9 (The Times of India) (Daily Times)
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • 39 people are killed in South Africa and thousands of homes are destroyed in Mozambique following widespread flooding. (Reuters)
  • Hundreds of people are hospitalised after an extreme cold spell in northern Vietnam that has also killed thousands of cows and buffaloes. (Straits Times)
International relations
Law and crime
  • Two judges are fired and a court official suspended in China over a life sentence imposed on a man who evaded thousands in motorway toll fees. The ruling is also overturned. (BBC) (NDTV) (Global Times)
  • A woman is sentenced to six months imprisonment in Mauritania for keeping two children in slave-like conditions. (BBC)
  • Rudolf Elmer, a former Swiss banker of Julius Baer passes files detailing tax evasion attempts by hundreds of politicians, celebrities and business leaders to Wikileaks. (Al Jazeera)
Politics and elections
  • Nearly 1,400 members of the ruling Communist Party of Vietnam gathers to vote for new leaders. (AFP) (Saigon Daily)
  • A man sets himself on fire outside the parliament building in Cairo, Egypt. Copycat burnings also take place in Algeria and Mauritania. (Reuters) (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • The leader of the Israeli Labor Party Ehud Barak and four other Labor Party MKs announce their resignation from the party and the formation of a new "centrist Zionist and democratic" faction called "Independence". (Jerusalem Post)
  • 2010–2011 Tunisian protests: Anti-government demonstrations continue to take place as a new cabinet is named. (BBC) (Sky News)
Transport
  • A computer glitch temporarily halts all bullet trains in northern and central Japan, affecting thousands of passengers. (Philippine Inquirer) (Japan Times)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • Brazil's military increases rescue and supply operations following the worst disaster in the country's history. (BBC)
  • South Africa declares eight of its nine provinces disaster areas following the deaths of 41 people during floods. (BBC)
  • Hundreds of flood victims in Sri Lanka protest over the alleged unfair distribution of emergency aid. (AFP via Google News)
International relations
Law and crime
  • The British government suggests the Association of Chief Police Officers (Acpo), a private company run by police chiefs, ought to have its power to run undercover spies removed after recent revelations about Mark Kennedy, policeman and undercover spy on international activists, as it acknowledges for the first time that "something had gone very wrong". (The Guardian)
  • Arrest of Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier:
    • Haitian authorities arrest former president Jean-Claude Duvalier. (Reuters via Alertnet) (BBC)
    • Corruption and theft charges are filed against Duvalier. (Al Jazeera)
  • Sudanese police arrest opposition leader Hassan al-Turabi and eight others after they called for a "popular revolution" if price rises were not reversed. (Reuters)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks

1 US service member was killed in Afghanistan. Spc. Joshua T. Lancaster

Business and economy
  • China and the United States sign a $45 billion export deal, including 200 Boeing airplanes. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
Disasters
Health and wellness
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters
  • Save the Children launches a £1 million appeal to help assist up to 400,000 children it expects are affected by a food crisis following Sri Lanka's worst floods in recent history. (The Guardian)
International relations
  • South Korea accepts North Korea's proposal of high-level military talks to discuss "pending issues". (Al Jazeera) (Yonhap) (Reuters)
  • The Vatican is said to be "troubled" by the latest sex scandal engulfing Italy's prime minister Silvio Berlusconi, alleging that Berlusconi purchased an under-age prostitute. (BBC)
  • President of Afghanistan Hamid Karzai, accompanied by ministers and business leaders, arrives in Russia. (Al Jazeera)
  • Chinese president Hu Jintao receives a hostile reception from the United States Congress; the country is accused of bullying its neighbours and its rulers are described as "Nazis". (The Guardian)
  • The largest rocket ever launched from the west coast of the U.S. is launched carrying a secret payload; speculated to be a spy satellite.(Reuters)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
  • 2010 tied for the warmest year ever recorded, and the last decade was the warmest ever recorded, since records began in the 1800s.(Reuters)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 21 people are killed in a clash between the Sudanese army and two rebel factions in Darfur. (Reuters)
  • Three people are shot dead and dozens are injured by riot police clashing with at least 20,000 protesters gathered outside the prime minister's office in Tirana, Albania. Deputy prime minister Ilir Meta has resigned after becoming embroiled in a fraud scandal and protesters have called for the rest of the government to resign. (AP via France24) (BBC) (Radio New Zealand) (AFP via Google News) (CNN)
  • A Nigerian general says armies in West Africa are ready to oust Ivorian president Laurent Gbagbo by force. (Al Jazeera)
  • The South Korean navy directs an operation against Somali pirates who hijacked a South Korean ship, rescuing all 21 hostages, while eight pirates are killed and five are captured. (AP via Google news)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
International relations
  • Five Thais including an MP are given suspended sentences after illegally entering Cambodia, in a case that has strained relations between the two countries. (Straits Times)
  • Israeli–Palestinian conflict:
    • United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon criticises Israel's refusal to cease illegal settlement building on Palestinian land, telling a UN General Assembly gathering that he is "very concerned at the lack of progress towards peace" and that the recent demolition of East Jerusalem's historic Shepherd Hotel and evictions of Palestinian families had "heightened tensions." He later meets survivors of the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp. (AFP via Google News)
    • Saudi Arabia tells a UN Security Council meeting that Israel's practices and illegal measures against the Palestinian people undermine international efforts for peace. (Arab News)
    • French foreign minister Michèle Alliot-Marie is met by hostile Palestinian protesters throwing stones, eggs and shoes, including mothers of prisoners held in Israeli jails, on her arrival in Gaza. (BBC) (KUNA) (CNN)
  • Six world powers and Iran meet in Istanbul to talk about Iran's nuclear programme; Iran denies allegations it is developing nuclear weapons. (Al Jazeera)
  • Almost 99% of South Sudanese voted for independence from the north in a referendum according to official figures. (Reuters) (Africasia)
  • United Nations human rights chief Navi Pillay requests an investigation into possible involvement of officials in the abduction of around 40 Central American migrants, including women and children, from a cargo train in Oaxaca. (BBC)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • Dutch national Vincent Tabak is charged with the murder of Joanna Yeates, and will make his first court appearance on 24 January. (Sky News) (BBC)
Politics and elections
  • Opposition supporters are arrested in Belarus after the swearing-in of President Alexander Lukashenko. (Al Jazeera)
  • A civil society report reveals that more than a quarter of Zimbabweans on the voters' roll are deceased. (Times Live South Africa)
  • Albania's prime minister Sali Berisha vows there will be no Tunisia-style uprising in his country after three people are killed for protesting against the government's rule. (BBC)
  • Tunisia's prime minister Mohamed Ghannouchi promises in a TV interview to leave politics "in the shortest possible timeframe" after elections to be held following President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali's recent fall. (BBC)
  • Situation in Ireland:
    • Taoiseach Brian Cowen announces he is to make a "significant" statement on his leadership of the ruling Fianna Fáil party in Dublin at 14:00, to be broadcast on television and radio. (Reuters) (RTÉ News)
    • Brian Cowen resigns as leader of Fianna Fáil on what he describes as being "on my own counsel". (Reuters) (The Guardian) (The Irish Times) (BBC) (RTÉ) (Brisbane Times)
    • Enda Kenny, leader of the opposition party Fine Gael, announces the party's intention to put forward a motion of no confidence in Brian Cowen on Tuesday if Cowen does not seek the immediate dissolution of Dáil Éireann. Labour also has a motion of no confidence in the Government scheduled for Wednesday, while Sinn Féin president Gerry Adams requests an immediate election. (The Irish Times)
    • Shadow finance spokesperson Michael Noonan promises that, if the Irish government resigns, the opposition Fine Gael party will give quicker support for the Finance Bill intended to impose harsh austerity measures upon the country. He offers to facilitate the Green Party in getting out of the Irish government coalition. (RTÉ)
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Actress Zsa Zsa Gabor is permitted to leave hospital and return home, eight days after undergoing the amputation of her right leg. (BBC)
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
  • Talks between Iran and the five permanent members of the UN Security Council plus Germany break down without an agreement to end the eight-year-old impasse over Iran's nuclear program, after Iranian officials refused to negotiate unless preconditions including an immediate halt to UN sanctions on Iran were met. (The Washington Post) (The Telegraph)
  • The BBC apologises after offending the sensibilities of Japanese viewers by broadcasting jokes targeting Tsutomu Yamaguchi, who survived both atomic bomb attacks carried out by the United States on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. (BBC)
  • WikiLeaks revelations:
  • The Palestine Papers
    • The largest ever release of confidential files in the history of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict, are released. (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian) (The Jerusalem Post)
    • The Palestinian Authority condemns Al- Jazeera for releasing the documents and denies that the Palestinian Authority had agreed to make far-reaching concessions on Jerusalem as the documents purportedly reveal.(The Jerusalem Post)
  • Israeli inquiry into the Gaza flotilla raid:
    • An Israeli inquiry finds its own army acts "legal pursuant to the rules of international law" during May's fatal Gaza flotilla raid in which 9 Turkish activists were killed; a separate United Nations inquiry said there had been an "unacceptable level of brutality". The inquiry also declares Israel's naval blockade of Gaza to be legal. (The Jerusalem Post) (BBC) (Al Jazeera) (The Irish Times) (AFP via Google News)
    • The Prime Minister of Turkey says that the results of the Israeli inquiry into the raid have no value or credibility. (BBC) (Ynet) (The Jerusalem Post)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • New interviews are released containing statements from former Israeli soldiers who claim they were told to "cleanse the neighbourhoods, the buildings, the area" and that the offensive should be disproportionate, with tank operators being told to shell any car that comes near them during the War on Gaza. (Channel 4) (The Telegraph)
  • At least 35 people are killed and 130 injured after a suicide bombing at Domodedovo International Airport in the Russian capital Moscow. (Russia Today) (Reuters)
  • Rebels in the Philippines kill five policemen in the first attack since an agreement to restart peace talks. (Al Jazeera) (Philippine Star)
  • Zimbabwean ministers condemn the invasion of tourist lodges by supporters of Robert Mugabe who say they were implementing government policy. (AFP) (BBC)
  • A series of bombings in Baghdad and Karbala kill at least 33 people less than a week after similar attacks claimed the lives of 133 others. (BBC) (CNN)
  • Twenty people are injured in China's Sichuan province following clashes with police over a proposed chemical plant, protesters and officials say. In a separate protest, riot police dispersed a group of parents who lost their children in the devastating 2008 earthquake after they tried to meet with the mayor of Deyang city to discuss compensation claims. (Radio Free Asia)
Arts and culture
  • Hamas bans the sale of two books that it says "contradict" Islam after receiving complaints from locals. (Associated Press)
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Sport
  • Sky Sports soccer commentators Richard Keys and Andy Gray apologise after making sexist comments about a woman during a live television broadcast. (The Sydney Morning Herald)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
  • Sky Sports sexism scandal:
    • Reporter Andy Gray is dropped by Sky Sports over sexist comments made against female official Sian Massey in footage recorded Saturday. (The Daily Telegraph) (The Guardian)
    • Minister for Sport Hugh Robertson and England football captain Rio Ferdinand criticise the "prehistoric pair" who described Massey as "fucking hopeless". (The Guardian)
    • Massey is stood down from a football game taking place tonight as she "has unwittingly found herself in the middle of a story that has nothing to do with her competence as a match official". (The Daily Telegraph)
  • A court in Serbia sentences 14 soccer hooligans to up to 35 years imprisonment for the 2009 murder of a 28-year-old French fan in Belgrade. (BBC News)
  • Australia and Japan win their semi-final games in the AFC Asian Cup and go on to the final that will be held on 29 January. (Bloomberg)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • At least 30 miners are trapped after an explosion in a coal mine in northeastern Colombia. (Colombia Reports) (CNTV) (BBC)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • Ten construction workers die after falling from the 28th floor of a skyscraper being built in Manila, the Philippine capital. (AFP via Google News) (AFP via Info Vietnam) (The Straits Times)
  • The Australian government proposes a new "flood tax" to raise funds for reconstruction work following severe flooding in the east of the country. (The Australian) (Al Jazeera)
Law and crime
  • Murder of David Kato:
    • Ugandan gay rights activist David Kato, who was named in tabloid paper Rolling Stone last year, is found murdered. (CNN) (AFP via Google News) (The Irish Times)
    • Rolling Stone says it has "no regrets about the story" and claims to be "just exposing people who were doing wrong". (The Guardian)
  • Hundreds of thousands of government workers protest against the killing of Yashwant Sonawane, an official in Maharashtra, a murder which is said to have shocked people across India. (BBC)
  • Macau tycoon Stanley Ho is to sue relatives accused of trying to steal his vast casino empire. (Macau News) (AFP) (Reuters)
  • A court in Botswana rules that indigenous Bushmen can drill wells for water in the Kalahari Desert. (BBC) (Gabz FM Botswana)
Politics and elections
Science
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2011 Egyptian protests:
    • After the Egyptian government censorship of social media websites (such as Twitter, Facebook and Google), internet access and SMS networks are cut off in response to anti-government protests. The Guardian (about censoring) The Guardian (about cutting off internet) (Al Jazeera)
    • Fresh protests take place across the country. (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian) (BBC) (The Daily Telegraph)
    • Police target protesters in Cairo with tear gas and water cannon, while tear gas is used on protesters in Alexandria. (The Guardian)
    • A protester is killed in Suez, while dozens of protesters are injured in Cairo. One protester happens to video-tape a man being shot by police. (Sky News) (AP)
    • The Egyptian government announces a curfew for cities nationwide starting at 6 pm local time and running through to 7 am on Saturday. (Bikya Masr)
    • Mubarak orders the army into the streets as buildings and police vehicles burn. (The Daily Telegraph)
    • The army is reported to be out on the streets of Cairo; protesters call for the support of the army in their battle against the Mubarak regime. (Al Jazeera)
    • Mohamed ElBaradei, is held among the protesters, while journalists are beaten and arrested, including one BBC journalist and four French reporters. (The Daily Telegraph)
    • Reuters reports at least 870 injuries in Cairo alone during the day, according to medical sources. (Reuters) (Al-Masry Al-Youm)
    • At least eight deaths are reported. (DAWN)
    • EgyptAir suspends its departures from Cairo for 12 hours, beginning at 9 pm, as a government-imposed curfew on the people of Egypt comes into effect. (AP via Google News)
    • NDP headquarters are set on fire in Cairo, with Al Jazeera footage showing the building ablaze. (iloubnan.info) (The Times of India) (USA Today) (Irish Examiner)
    • The same fire threatens the nearby world-famous Egyptian Museum, with concerns expressed for the safety of its contents. A powerful explosion is heard in the area. There are reports that protesters are trying to protect the museum. (RIA Novosti) (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel)
    • President Mubarak calls on the government to resign, but gives no indication that he will stand down. (CNN) (BBC),(Washington Post)
    • International response to the 2011 Egyptian protests:
      • International politicians, including William Hague and Hillary Clinton, speak out in support of the aims of the protesters and ask the Mubarak regime to listen to the people. (BBC) (The Wall Street Journal)
      • Vice President of the United States Joe Biden attracts criticism for his refusal to refer to Mubarak as a "dictator", instead describing him as "an ally of ours in a number of things and he's been very responsible on, relative to geopolitical interests in the region: Middle East peace efforts, the actions Egypt has taken relative to normalizing the relationship with Israel". (The New York Times) (The Washington Post)
      • The protests leave Western governments which have supported the regime in an awkward position, both diplomatically and democratically. (Reuters)
      • The latest U.S. diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks indicate that police brutality in Egypt is "routine and pervasive" and the use of torture so widespread that the Egyptian government has stopped denying it exists. (The Guardian)
      • Further cables reveal the Obama administration wished to maintain its close political and military relationship with Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak and its belief that Mubarak would "inevitably win" yet another presidential election in 2011. (The Guardian)
      • Demonstrations occur worldwide, with people expressing solidarity with the people of Egypt in international cities such as Istanbul, Tunis, Doha and London. (Al Jazeera)
      • The government-imposed curfew on the people of Egypt causes European airlines, including British Airways, Lufthansa and Air France, to alter their schedules, with some cancellations and some passengers being redirected to different countries. (Reuters)
  • Thousands of people take to the streets of Jordan for the third consecutive Friday of protests over inflation, unemployment and rising prices, amid demands for the resignation of Prime Minister Samir Rifai. (Al Jazeera) (The Jerusalem Post) (The Financial Times)
  • Key ministers from the heavily criticised ousted government of Zine El Abidine Ben Ali are replaced but interim Tunisian prime minister Mohammed Ghannouchi refuses to back down in the face of public anger. (Al Jazeera)
  • Around 100,000 supporters of Albania's opposition Socialist Party pay silent tribute to three men shot dead at an anti-government protest a week ago. The Socialist supporters disperse calmly after a two-hour procession. (Reuters)
  • Police fire tear gas at anti-government protesters in Gabon two days after opposition leader André Mba Obame declares himself president. (Reuters)
  • At least four people, including Modu Fannami Gubio, a former opposition All Nigeria Peoples Party (ANPP) candidate for governor in Borno, Nigeria, are shot dead in Maiduguri. (BBC)
  • During a clash between Palestinians and Israeli settlers in the West Bank, an Israeli settler shoots and kills an 18-year-old Palestinian. (Haaretz) (BBC) (CNN)
  • 8 people are killed in a suicide attack at a Finest supermarket near the British embassy in the wealthy Wazir Akbar Khan suburb of Kabul. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2011 Egyptian protests:
    • The protests continue as Egyptian Army tanks surround Cairo's Tahrir Square. (CNN) (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian)
    • Thousands of demonstrators converge on Egypt's Interior Ministry, one of the most visible signs of state authority in Egypt. Police shoot the demonstrators. Medical aid is given at the doors of mosques. (CNN)
    • Five protesters are reported to have been wounded at the Interior Ministry. (Reuters)
    • At least 100 people are killed and 1,000 injured in clashes so far. (Reuters), (NineMSN)
    • Omar Suleiman is sworn in as Vice President of Egypt, the first person to hold the office under President Hosni Mubarak, who has reigned for 30 years. (Haaretz)
    • Mubarak selects Ahmed Shafiq, a former air force commander and aviation minister, as his new prime minister, preserving the top three political jobs for men with military links. (Reuters)
    • The parliament speaker says Egypt has no plans for early elections despite the mass popular demonstrations against the government. (Reuters)
    • Wealthy Egyptian businessman Ahmed Ezz, a close confidante of Mubarak's son, resigns from the ruling NDP party. At least one of his steel company's offices has been targeted by protesters. (Reuters)
    • A curfew is extended from 16:00 until 8:00 Egyptian time according to state television. (The Times of India)
    • Suzanne Mubarak, the wife of President Hosni Mubarak and First Lady of Egypt, is reported to have fled to London. (Ynetnews)
    • The police disappear from the streets of Cairo but civilians fill the void by quickly forming groups to defend homes and important buildings. (Reuters)
    • 19 private jets carrying families of wealthy businessmen leave Cairo for Dubai. (The Guardian)
    • Egyptian Museum during the riots:
      • Head of antiquities Zahi Hawass says ancient artifacts at the famous Egyptian Museum in Cairo are safe from looters but could still be damaged by the potential collapse of NDP headquarters which was gutted by fire yesterday. (AP via Google News)
      • Two mummies housed at the Egyptian Museum are destroyed and statues are broken into pieces, though ordinary citizens unite to prevent further destruction. The vandals are reported to have been convicts who escaped amid the protests. (Al-Masry Al-Youm) (Gadling) (Press TV) (The Voice of Russia)
      • Young people in Egypt form a human chain to protect the Egyptian Museum from further attacks. (Herald Sun)
    • International response to the 2011 Egyptian protests:
      • Viewers across the region and worldwide watch events unfold on Al Jazeera, which maintains an almost continuous live feed despite the Egyptian government's repeated censorship efforts. CNN claims its reporters have been attacked and cameras smashed. (The New York Times)
      • The BBC condemns the treatment given to one of its reporters, who has been deliberately assaulted by police while doing his work in Cairo. He was beaten up with steel bars, "the ones used here for slaughtering animals". (Ynetnews) (The Guardian)
      • China blocks searches for "Egypt" on its internet and restricts media coverage. (Al Jazeera) (AFP via Google News)
      • Protesters gather outside the Egyptian embassy in London calling for Mubarak to resign. (Reuters)
      • Protesters gather outside the Egyptian embassy in Amman in support of "the people of Egypt" and calling on the United States: "do not interfere". (AFP via Google News)
      • Protesters gather outside the Egyptian embassy in Washington, D.C., with the organisers saying they want the people of Egypt to know that Americans are watching and aware of events in the country. (The Washington Post)
      • People gather in historic Harvard Square in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the United States to peacefully protest against the Mubarak regime. They wave Egyptian flags, hold up signs, chant for Mubarak's resignation and call for an end to cell phone and Internet censorship perpetrated by the Egyptian government. (Boston Herald)
      • Thousands of people gather in front of the United Nations in New York City to support the anti-government protests. (The Star-Ledger)
  • 2011 Yemeni protests: Clashes take place outside the Egyptian embassy between supporters of President Ali Abdullah Saleh's government and opposition supporters expressing sympathy with the situation in Egypt. (One India) (CNN) (Al Jazeera)
  • 2011 English protests: Thousands of protesters demonstrate against cuts and increases in tuition fees in England; police escort student leader Aaron Porter away in Manchester amid calls from protesters for his resignation. (The Guardian)
  • Investigators in Russia say they have discovered the identities of those responsible for the bombing at Domodedovo International Airport in Moscow. (RIA Novosti) (AFP via Google News)
  • War in Afghanistan (2001–present):
  • Clashes between rebels and government forces in Somalia leave several civilians dead in the capital Mogadishu. (CP)
Business and economy
  • China begins the first test flights of private helicopters in its airspace. (AFP via Google News)
  • Wall Street firm Goldman Sachs triples the base salary of its chief executive Lloyd Blankfein to $2 million, up from $600,000, after the bank's profit falls by 38 per cent. (BBC)
  • Close to 8,000 protesters rally in Hamilton, Ontario to support workers locked out from Stelco after disagreeing against pension changes made by U.S. Steel. Analysts predict that similar protests may spread across the country. (CTV) (Niagara Falls Review)
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
  • A Buddhist monk is the first person to be charged under a strict anti-smoking law in Bhutan, introduced in 2005. (The Straits Times)
  • Guillermo Fariñas, known for his hunger strike campaigns, is released after having been detained by Cuban authorities for the third time in 48 hours. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2011 Egyptian protests:
    • Demonstrations against the government, in which more than 150 people have been killed and over 4,000 injured, continue. (Al Jazeera) (The Guardian) (BBC) (RIA Novosti)
    • Egypt's information minister cancels licenses and accreditation of staff working for the Al Jazeera international news network. The network's Cairo bureau office is to be shut down by the Egyptian government. An Al Jazeera spokesman describes the move as "an act designed to stifle and repress the freedom of reporting by the network and its journalists". (AFP via Google News) (The Guardian) (RIA Novosti) (Times LIVE) (Al Jazeera)
    • Al Jazeera English is unavailable by cable television across most of the United States. (The Huffington Post) (Al Jazeera coverage)
    • More than 10 people are killed in fresh clashes. (Sify)
    • President Hosni Mubarak meets the military, holding talks with Vice President Omar Suleiman, Defence Minister Mohamed Hussein Tantawi, Chief of Staff Sami al-Anan and other senior commanders. (Reuters via The Irish Times)
    • Several prison breaks occur, including the escape of 5,000 from a jail in Faiyum Governorate, many including 34 members of the Muslim Brotherhood from Wadi El Natrun, where eight people were killed in riots, and at least eight Hamas militants from Abu Zaabal Prison in Cairo, two of them escaping to Gaza, and two policemen and twelve escaped inmates were killed there; many more escaped from Tora Prison in Cairo, close to where 'dozens' of people were killed. Soldiers have been deployed outside of many prisons. (AFP via Google News) (Hindustan Times) (Reuters Africa) (Bangkok Post) (Press TV)
    • Egyptian air force fighter planes fly low over Cairo and helicopters hover above the city as protestors defy the government-ordered curfew. (Reuters) (CBC News) (Los Angeles Times) (BBC)
    • Egyptian authorities extend the curfew hours they are imposing on the people of Egypt. The government threatens to open fire on any person who disobeys its rule. (RIA Novosti) (The Guardian)
    • Mohamed ElBaradei urges the United States to call for the resignation of President Mubarak. (Reuters) (The Wall Street Journal)
    • Former interior minister Habib al-Adli is urgently evacuated from the ministry building in central Cairo amid gunfire. He was one of the cabinet members dismissed by Mubarak yesterday and is accused of ordering troops to open fire on those protesting against Mubarak. (RIA Novosti)
    • Thousands of anti-government protesters in Cairo defy a curfew and intimidation from the Egyptian military as fighter jets swoop low over the crowds gathered in Tahrir Square. (Sky News) (TODAYonline)
    • International response to the 2011 Egyptian protests:
      • King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia expresses his disapproval of current events in Egypt, to which President of the United States Barack Obama responds that he "understands" Abdullah's concerns. (Arab News)
      • Protesters gather peacefully outside the Egyptian Embassy in Lebanon in support of the current uprising against the Mubarak regime, chanting, "Down with Mubarak!" and "Egypt is an Arab, not a U.S. state!" (Daily Star)
      • Israel privately worries and is "anxiously monitoring" events in Egypt according to the country's prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (CNN) (The Times of India)
      • Hamas officials shut the Rafah Border Crossing "for several days" as guards on the Egyptian side of the border with Gaza flee. This prevents hundreds of Palestinians from crossing into Egypt. (The Times of India) (Xinhua)
      • Several countries, including Greece, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and the United States, announce plans to evacuate citizens from Egypt. Cairo's U.S. embassy schedules flights to so-called safe haven locations in Europe. (Arabian Business) (Reuters via Arab News) (CNN) (The Guardian)
      • The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) in the Philippines sets aside a P25-million standby fund for Filipinos in Egypt, though the official line is that Filipinos there are safe. Non-government labor organization Migrante-Middle East calls for the immediate evacuation of Filipino workers in Egypt. (ABS-CBN News) (The Philippine Star)
      • The Indian government airlifts 300 Indians, mostly women and children, from Egypt as the crisis worsens. (The Times of India)
      • Bulgarian Foreign Minister Nikolai Mladenov speaks out on the crisis in Egypt. (Sofia Echo)
      • Protests from the Egyptian diaspora and supporters occur worldwide. (BBC) (Euronews) (Al Jazeera) (CBC) (Ynetnews)
  • 2011 Sudan protests: Anti-government demonstrators face off against riot police who fire tear gas and beat up students in Khartoum during protests inspired by those in Egypt and Tunisia. (Al Jazeera)
  • 2010–2011 Tunisian uprising: Rachid Ghannounchi, leader of the once banned Ennahda party, flies back to the country from London after 22 years in exile following the ousting of President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali. (Al Jazeera) (BBC)
  • Thousands of people march in Derry, Northern Ireland, in memory of those killed by British troops in the 1972 Bloody Sunday massacre of civil rights protesters and local bystanders. It is intended to be the final such march after the British government admitted last year that its troops had been responsible for carrying out the Bogside massacre. (CNN) (RTÉ) (Irish Examiner) (BBC)
  • A fire in an arms depot of the Anonymous Venezuelan Campaign of Military Industries (CAVIM) in Maracy city of Aragua state killed at least one person and forced authorities to evacuate about 10,000 people. (Xinhua)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
Law and crime
  • A Vietnamese journalist known for his high-profile reporting dies after being set on fire. (BBC) (CP via Google News)
  • The directors of two companies based in York and Kent are charged with conspiring to illegally export Chinese-produced weapons to the United States after having imported them into the UK via Germany. The incident breaches an embargo by the United States, which disagrees with the importation of weapons made in China. (The Observer)
  • Ahead of his court case Julian Assange is interviewed at the Norfolk country house where he is staying, having been up all night preparing U.S. State Department cables relevant to ongoing events in Egypt for inclusion on the WikiLeaks website. (The Observer)
Politics and elections
Science
  • Exotic birds are found to have been driven into Britain's back gardens by the extreme cold, as more than half a million people participate in the largest wildlife survey in the world. (The Observer)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • 2011 Egyptian protests:
  • 2011 Sudan protests: A student dies after being attacked by security forces amid anti-government demonstrations in the country. (Reuters)
  • Nigerian police say they have foiled a bomb attack at a church in the city of Bauchi, days after deadly clashes between Christian and Muslim youths. (Reuters)
  • A suicide bomber kills DSP Rashid Khan, a senior local police official in the northwestern Pakistani city of Peshawar, and at least three others. (AP via Star Tribune), (Geo TV)
  • Police in Bangladesh fire tear gas at 20,000 demonstrators protesting against government plans to build an airport south of the capital Dhaka. A policeman is killed in the incident. (AFP via Google News) (BBC)
  • At least 17 people are killed and scores more injured in a shootout between opposing government security forces in Mogadishu, Somalia. (Xinhua)
Business and economy
  • Pharmaceutical companies Genzyme and Sanofi-Aventis are reported to have reached an "agreement in principle" on a deal in which Sanofi, a French company, will acquire Cambridge-based Genzyme for an undetermined amount of money. (CNBC)
  • The price of oil rises above $100 for the first time since 2008 as traders worry about possible disruption to the Suez Canal as a result of events in Egypt. (AFP via The Bangkok Post)
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
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References

  1. ^ July 12, 2010| 8:52 am (2010-07-12). "IRAN: Judiciary official says woman to be stoned for husband's murder, not just adultery | Babylon & Beyond | Los Angeles Times". Latimesblogs.latimes.com. Retrieved 2016-03-22. 
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