Portal:Current events/December 2015

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December 2015 was the twelfth and final month of that common year. The month, which began on a Tuesday, ended on a Thursday after 31 days.

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from December 2015.

Armed conflict and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
  • Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg announces the plan to donate 99 percent of the company stock he and his wife Priscilla Chan own over their lifetimes, shares today worth about $45 billion, to "advance human potential and promote equality for all children." (The Washington Post)
Disasters and accident
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
  • Death of Jennifer Laude
  • Chicago, Illinois Mayor Rahm Emanuel asked for and received the resignation of that city’s police superintendant Garry McCarthy. Emanuel spoke of the loss of the public’s confidence in the city police and announced a task force on police accountability. The change comes in the wake of protests over the release of police footage showing the October 2014 shooting of Laquan McDonald. (CNN)
  • The U.S. Supreme Court rejected a request from Texas and other states for a 30-day extension to file legal briefs in support of the lawsuit to block the immigration plan. Instead, the justices accepted the Justice Department’s request for a shortened eight-day extension, meaning that if the court decides to take the case, a decision would probably come by late June. The court is not expected to decide until January whether to take the case. (The Washington Post)
Science and technology
  • A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on gender identity reports brains do not really fit into "male" or "female" categories. Tel Aviv University's Daphna Joel's research team, in analyzing the MRI scans of some 1,400 individuals, found only a very small number of the brains studied had features that were entirely male, female, or intermediate between the two. The vast majority had a mosaic. (The Washington Post), (The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences), (Daphna Joel)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • The Institute of Contemporary History in Munich announces a publication of a two-volume set of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf. The new edition, which contains 3,500 scholarly annotations, is intended, The New York Times reports, “To set the work in historical context, to show how Hitler wove truth with half-truth and outright lie, and thus to defang any propagandistic effect while revealing Nazism.” This is the first printing in Germany since the end of World War II. (The New York Times), (The Week)
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
  • Authorities arrest four Kosovo jihadists men, three in Italy and one in Kosovo, for making nonspecific threats against Pope Francis and the former U.S. Ambassador to Kosovo. The men are described by police as highly dangerous and as having celebrated the November 2015 Paris attacks. (The Independent via MSN)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Israel’s Holocaust and Remembrance Center posthumously adds U.S. Army Master Sergeant Roddie Edmonds to the list of the Righteous Among the Nations for his actions in 1945 at a Nazi prisoner of war camp. (NPR), (Yad Vashem)
  • Harvard Law School officials are reviewing the use of the school’s seal that includes three bushels of wheat, which also appears on Isaac Royall's family coat of arms. Royall, a slaveholder whose father was known to be a cruel owner, left part of his estate to help found the law school. (MSNBC), (The Boston Globe)
Business and economy
  • Samsung concedes to surrender $548 million to Apple Inc. over previously court-held ruling in patent dispute over copying the look of the iPhone. (Reuters)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • 2015 South Indian floods
    • Many parts of Chennai still remain flooded, including almost all of South Chennai. Food and other basics are in short supply throughout the city. (The Times of India)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • The Bank for International Settlements, in Basel, cautions that the regulatory push to get all derivatives trading into central clearing systems may be creating a new group of Too Big to Fail financial institutions. This time, however, they will be international. (Reuters)
  • Basic income
    • Finland's government plans to give all its citizens, rich or poor, a monthly payment of €800, with no strings attached. The Finnish government says it wants to launch a “universal basic income experiment” in 2017 to test the feasibility of this program, which would replace the country’s current benefits system. (The Christian Science Monitor via Yahoo)
Disasters and accidents
Health and medicine
  • Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter announces that his latest medical tests show he is cancer-free. Carter, 91, announced in August that a melanoma for which he had been treated had returned. (The Atlantic Journal-Constitution) (NPR)
International relations
  • Turkey–Ukraine relations
    • Turkish and Ukrainian firms talk out a cooperation deal to help modernize their country's militaries in the wake of military actions by Russia. (Defense News)
  • Germany's vice-chancellor, Sigmar Gabriel, accuses Saudi Arabia of financing Islamic extremism in the West and warns that it must stop. He tells German media, “We have to make clear to the Saudis that the time of looking away is over, Wahhabi mosques all over the world are financed by Saudi Arabia. Many Islamists who are a threat to public safety come from these communities in Germany". His comments come days after Germany's Federal Intelligence Service released a report saying Saudi Arabia was "destabilizing" the Arab world. (The Telegraph)
Law and crime
  • Clashes erupt in Athens between left-wing demonstrators and Greek police with at least eighteen people arrested. (Reuters)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • The United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) files an administrative complaint challenging office-supplies giant Staples' proposed $6.3 billion acquisition of top rival Office Depot. The FTC said the deal would significantly reduce national competition in the market for office supplies sold to large business customers. The companies plan to contest the FTC decision. (USA Today) (Bloomberg via Chicago Tribune)
  • General Electric announces that it has abandoned its plan to sell its appliances business to Sweden's Electrolux. The U.S. Department of Justice had filed an antitrust suit in summer 2015 to block the $3.3 billion acquisition. (The Wall Street Journal)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • The JAXA probe Akatsuki successfully enters orbit around Venus five years after the first attempt. This mission is Japan's first successful mission to another planet. The orbital injection was achieved using the probe's attitude control thrusters, a feat which has never been done before. (Gizmag) (Spaceflight Now)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • UK-based Anglo American plc (AAUKF) announces plans to slash 85k jobs and shed 60% of assets over the next several years; it will also halt dividend payments for the rest of 2015-16 and cut capital expenditures. The company cited depressed commodity prices for its actions. (CNNMoney)
  • U.S. airplane manufacturer Boeing unveils the first Boeing 737 MAX airplane at its factory in Renton, Washington. (The Seattle Times) (Seattle Post-Intelligencer)
Disasters and accidents
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • A group of mayors and officials from American cities such as Philadelphia and New York City say that if they had their way Donald Trump would be banned from their cities for his comments on Muslims. (NBC)
  • The Republican Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell distance the party from presidential candidate Donald Trump’s recent comments calling for a ban on Muslims entering the United States. While not entering into a political fray – in view of U.S. partnerships with Muslim nations and Muslim personnel serving in the United States Armed Forces – the Pentagon press secretary calls anti-Muslim rhetoric a national security threat. (CNN) (Politico)
  • Elections in Indonesia
    • Millions of voters in the world's third biggest democracy participated in Indonesia's local elections in 264 regions, just over half of the country's electorates. There is heightened security due to threats by domestic terror groups linked to the Islamic State, as well as increased scrutiny to prevent electoral fraud. Direct elections to choose local leaders were established a decade ago. Official results from the polls will not be available until December 18, 2015. (Straits Times) (Deutsche Welle)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • The Hollywood Foreign Press Association announces the 73rd Golden Globe Awards nominees for the best films and television productions of 2015. The winners will be announced on January 10, 2016. (Los Angeles Times)
  • The Pew Research Center announces a new study that shows the American middle class, long seen as the economic backbone of the country, is shrinking and no longer constitutes a majority (49.89%). Also, the "nation's aggregate household income has substantially shifted from middle-income to upper-income households." (Headlines & Global News) (Christian Science Monitor) (Pew Research Center)
  • The Vatican releases a 10,000-word document that, among other things, says Jews don't need to be converted to find salvation, and that Catholics should work with Jews to fight antisemitism. (NPR) (Reuters) (Vatican-full text)
Business and economics
International relations
Law and crime
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • 2015 South Indian floods
    • Major UK-based reinsurance broker Aon Benfield estimates India has suffered over US$3 billion (over Rs. 200 billion) worth of losses as a result of the flooding, and rates them as the costliest floods and the eighth-costliest natural disaster of 2015.(Business Standard)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Louisa Johnson wins The X Factor after beating Ghanaian duo Reggie N Bollie, becoming the show's youngest ever winner at the age of 17. her cover of Bob Dylan's 1974 track "Forever Young" released after she won.(Daily Mail)
Disasters and accidents
  • At least 23 patients are killed and 23 injured in a psychiatric hospital fire in the Voronezh Oblast in western Russia. The remaining 24 patients were safely evacuated. (ABC News America) (AP via The Charlotte Observer)
International relations
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • Oil price reached its lowest since December 2008. Other indicators in broader markets caused investor jitters ahead of the expected interest rate hike by the U.S. central bank on Wednesday. (Reuters)
  • The Seattle City Council unanimously votes to give Uber, Lyft, and other contract drivers the power to unionize. The Washington city becomes the first in the United States to do so. Seattle Mayor Ed Murray opposes the bill which can still become law without his signature. Court challenges are expected. (The Seattle Times) (USA Today) (The Seattle Times - background)
Disasters and accidents
Health and medicine
Law and crime
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
  • 2015 Pacific typhoon season
    • Typhoon Melor (Nona) causes widespread flooding and blackouts in the Philippines. More than 700,000 people had been evacuated ahead of the storm which hit late on Monday night. (New York Times)
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
  • A Baltimore, Maryland deadlocked jury was told by the trial judge to resume deliberations after closing arguments in the first trial of police officer William Porter, charged in the death of Freddie Gray. With demonstrations and unrest following the death, the city has cancelled leave for police officers and the mayor has called for calm when a verdict is announced. (CNN) (The Gazette)
  • Schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District close after receiving an unspecified "electronic" threat. Later, authorities conclude the threat was a hoax, and announce schools will reopen Wednesday. New York City schools' initial response to a similar threatening email was to treat it as a hoax. The emails were largely identical and had been routed through a server in Frankfurt, apparently by the same person. (BBC News) (ITV) (LA School Report) (CNN) (The New York Times)
  • American entertainer Bill Cosby, in response to dozens of accusations of sexual assault and misconduct spanning decades, has filed in U.S. federal court in Massachusetts a defamation suit against seven accusers. (The New York Times)
  • United Kingdom police arrest a 21-year-old man in Berkshire in the hacking of Hong Kong-based electronic toy maker VTech. Details of more than six million people from servers used to support VTech's learning products app store were compromised. (BBC) (Digital Trends)
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
  • Japan's Supreme Court upholds a 19th-century law that requires married couples to have the same surname, but struck down another law that barred women from remarrying within six months of a divorce as unconstitutional. (The Guardian)
  • The North Korean (DPRK) supreme court convicts and sentences South Korea-born Canadian pastor Hyeon Soo Lim to hard labor for life for trying to overthrow the DPRK and undermine the country's social system. Lim's relatives said he's traveled to North Korea more than 100 times since 1997, to help people, but not for any particular political purpose. Lim, from the Light Korean Presbyterian Church in Toronto, has been in custody since February. (Reuters) (Xinhua News Agency) (The Guardian)
  • A bank in Minnesota (U.S.) is robbed by the same person a second time while an Iowa television station was doing a live update on the first robbery. The robber was arrested shortly afterwards. (Associated Press)
  • After the jury fails to reach a unanimous decision, a Baltimore, Maryland, judge declares a mistrial in the trial of police officer William Porter, the first officer to be charged in the death of Freddie Gray. (NBC News) (ABC News)
  • About 100 men in more than 50 machine gun-mounted trucks kidnap at least 26 Qataris, including members of the royal family, from a hunting camp in Iraq near the Saudi border. (Sky News)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
  • A 6.4-magnitude earthquake hits the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. The epicenter was 11 kilometers (7 miles) from the town of Tres Picos, not far from the Pacific coast. There are no immediate reports of major damage or injuries. (Reuters) (USGS)
  • As many as 36 miners die in a pair of accidents in Northeast China. (AP via ABC News)
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • The Vatican announces Mother Teresa's eligibility for canonization after a Vatican spokesman confirmed Pope Francis' recognition of a second miracle attributed to her involving the healing of a Brazilian man with multiple brain tumors. The Vatican has yet to confirm a canonization date for Teresa. (Agence France-Presse via The Guardian) (Reuters via The Hindu)
Business and economics
  • In the United States, JPMorgan Chase agrees to pay $307 million to settle federal cases where the bank failed to disclose certain conflicts of interest to some of its wealth management clients. (Reuters) (Huffington Post)
  • Isis Pharmaceuticals Inc. announces it will change its name to Ionis Pharmaceuticals Inc. on December 22. Its stock exchange ticker symbol will be IONS. (Reuters)
Disasters and accidents
  • Pollution in China
    • The Chinese government warns residents in Northern China to prepare for a wave of choking smog arriving over the weekend and lasting through Tuesday, with Beijing affected hardest. The capital city issues its second-ever "red alert" -- the first was announced on December 7, 2015. This alert triggers the odd-even license plate system to halve cars on the road, and recommends schools close. China's National Meteorological Center reports the pollution will stretch from Xi'an, across part of Central China, through Beijing and up into Shenyang and Harbin in China's frigid northeast. (Reuters) (South China Morning Post)
International relations
Law and crime
  • In the United States, a group of hospitals, 32 in 15 states, agree to pay a total of $28 million to settle charges they submitted false claims to Medicare for a type of spinal fracture treatment. This is the latest settlement stemming from a decade-old whistleblower lawsuit about alleged inappropriate billing for kyphoplasty. More than 130 hospitals have paid about $105 million to settle billing claims from this spinal procedure. (Reuters) (The Arizona Republic)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
  • 2015 Shenzhen landslide
    • Thirty-three buildings collapse after a landslide hit an industrial park in Shenzhen, China, leaving at least 91 people missing. (CNN)
  • An avalanche in Svalbard, a Norwegian Arctic archipelago, kills one and injures nine others as the snow smashes into 10 houses in Longyearbyen. The deluge from Sukkertoppen mountain follows Friday's 60 mph storm that ripped off a school roof and temporarily closed the airport. Dozens of homes at the foot of the mountain were evacuated and all of the area's residents have been located, according to Tone Hertzberg, a spokeswoman for Svalbard's governor. Experts from Norges Geotekniske Institutt are examining nearby slopes. (AP via CBS News) (newsinenglish.no)
  • A ferry ran into trouble in rough seas off the coast of Indonesia's island of Sulawesi, with at least three killed, including two children, 39 rescued, and 77 missing. The New Marina, a fiberglass boat, was reported to be carrying 109 passengers with a crew of 10. The National Search and Rescue Agency says the boat sank 22.5 km (24 miles) off the coast of the Wajo Regency in South Sulawesi. Rescue teams expect to resume their search for the missing, Monday. (BenarNews) (Muscat Daily)
  • Two pilots are killed after a South Korean-made KAI T-50 Golden Eagle crashes and bursts into flames at an air show in Yogyakarta on Indonesia's Java island. (The Telegraph)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Health and medicine
International relations
Politics and elections
Sports
  • 2015 FIFA corruption case
    • FIFA's ethics committee issues an eight-year ban on President Sepp Blatter and UEFA President Michel Platini from any football-related activity for a CHF 2,000,000 (£1.3m/US$2.02m) payment to Platini that Blatter approved. Ethics judges decided the pair, who were also fined, broke rules on conflict of interest, breach of loyalty, and offering or receiving gifts. Both men deny wrongdoing and intend to appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). (BBC Sport) (Reuters) (Al Jazeera) (FIFA text via Channel NewsAsia)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • Turing Pharmaceuticals says that it is looking for a new CEO in the aftermath of the indictment of its old boss, Martin Shkreli, on securities fraud charges. Turing and Shkreli became infamous together in September 2015, when they hiked the price of an AIDS drug by 5000%. (Reuters)
Disasters and accidents
Health
Politics and elections
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • The governments of Somalia, Tajikistan and Brunei ban celebrations of Christmas, with punishments ranging up to a five-year jail term. Each country has a majority-Muslim population. (The Guardian)
Disasters and accidents
  • Tornadoes of 2015
    • At least six people die and dozens injured as major storms, packed with tornadoes, move through the American South and Midwest. Three people died when a tornado hit northern Mississippi, one was killed in Arkansas and two more in Tennessee. Officials continue searching into the night for the missing. (CNN) (AP via The Washington Post) (Weather.com) (Reuters)
Health
  • Brazilian health officials announce 2,400 babies (up from 147 in 2014) have been born this year with microcephaly, a neurological disorder that can result in incomplete brain development which can be caused by the mosquito-borne Zika virus, and advise would-be parents, especially in the country's northeast where most of the cases occurred, to avoid pregnancy. (CNN) (The Washington Post) (Medical Daily)
International relations
  • Yemeni Crisis
    • The United Nations Security Council expressed “deep concern” at the number of violations of Yemen’s ceasefire. U.N. envoys warned that a fledgling peace process was hanging by a thread, and that Yemen faces permanent fragmentation if the conflict is not ended soon. (Reuters) (Time) (Saudi Gazette) (UN)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • Three business services companies are engaged in an auction to purchase Perot Systems from Dell. (Reuters)
Disasters and accidents
  • A fire at the Jizan General Hospital in Jizan, Saudi Arabia, kills at least 24 people and injures over 100. The blaze began on the first floor of the hospital which contains the maternity ward and intensive care unit. Government-controlled Al Ekhbariya television reports the cause of the fire seems to be electrical. (Al Jazeera) (The News Tribe) (Reuters) (Pakistan Today)
  • Tornadoes of 2015
    • Officials report the casualties from yesterday's spring-like storm that triggered more than 20 tornadoes, destroyed homes, delayed and cancelled air flights, and caused power outages in the U.S. Midwest and Southeast have risen to at least 11 people killed with dozens injured. Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant declares a state of emergency in areas affected by the storm. (NBC News) (Reuters)
  • Up to 100 people die in an explosion at an LPG gas plant in Nnewi, Anambra, in southern Nigeria. Sources indicate the accident was caused by a truck discharging its contents before the mandatory cooling time had expired. (BBC) (Vanguard)
  • Uruguay's National Emergencies System reports two people have died in flooding from heavy rains in its northern provinces, and almost 5,500 have been evacuated. The Uruguay River has risen close to three meters over safe levels in Paysandú, and almost four meters (13 feet) in Salto. (Fox News Latino) (Latin American Herald Tribune)
Health and medicine
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • With the death of an 18-year-old killer whale at its San Antonio, Texas facility and the recent malfunction of the Sky Tower ride at its park in Orlando, Florida, SeaWorld’s problems in the wake of recent earning shortfalls, decline in attendance, and drop the values of its shares. In response, the company plans new pricing and attractions. (CNN) (CNN) (CNNMoney)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • At least one person is injured and another is arrested after a machete attack at Intu Bromley shopping centre in the United Kingdom during the busy annual Boxing Day sales. A motive or possible link to terrorism has not yet been established. (The Guardian)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • In the Louisville community of St. Matthews, Kentucky, US, disruptive behavior by a crowd of up to 2,000 teenagers and young adults, including numerous fights and unconfirmed reports of gunshots fired, causes Mall St. Matthews, one of the largest shopping malls in the state, to close early. Despite the unrest, no arrests were made and only minor injuries were reported. (NBC News)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
International relations
Law and crime
  • A police officer storms the police headquarters in the city of Ponce, Puerto Rico, and shoots dead three fellow officers, including a commanding officer. Authorities say Guarionex Candelario, 50, was arrested for the killings shortly afterwards and taken to hospital for minor injuries. (NY Daily News)
  • A U.S. grand jury decides not to bring charges against a Cleveland policeman over the killing of 12 year old Tamir Rice. (BBC)
  • Guatemalan Gustavo Alejos Cambara, once private secretary to former President Álvaro Colom, turns himself in to authorities on charges related to government medicine procurement corruption. (AP)
Politics and elections
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economics
  • American chemical giant DuPont announces that, in early 2016, it will cut 1,700 jobs in Delaware, about 28 percent of its home state workforce, and thousands more globally in connection as a result of the Dow Chemical Company merger. (The Washington Post) (AP via NBC news) (Delaware Online)
Disasters and accidents
Health and medicine
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and Accidents
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
  • Central African general election, 2015–16
    • Voters in the Central African Republic are heading to the polls for the rescheduled parliamentary elections and the first round of the presidential election, where 30 candidates are running to replace Acting President Catherine Samba-Panza. The presidential runoff election is scheduled for 31 January 2016. The Central African Republic has been rocked by unrest since the March 2013 coup of president François Bozizé by Séléka, a mostly Muslim alliance of anti-government groups. Thousands have died and about one million people have been displaced in the ongoing sectarian violence between Séléka and the Christian anti-balaka militia. The United Nations peacekeeping mission has promised a heavy security presence today. (AP via The Washington Post) (Pulse News Agency)
    • Ballot counting is underway after a peaceful election day in this country plagued by years of sectarian violence. National Elections Authority President Marie-Madeleine Koue says at least 65 percent turnout was expected. (EuroNews) (Bloomberg via The National)
Science and technology
  • The freak weather system responsible for heavy rain and tornadoes in the U.S., and high winds and rainfall in the British Isles, also has impacted the Arctic where the average winter temperature is normally around −20 °F (−29 °C). Temperatures around the North Pole have surpassed the 32 °F (0 °C) threshold for a brief moment, according to the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Prediction Center, which is 50 °F (27.8 °C) higher than usual for December. (The Washington Post) (South China Morning Post) (Sputnik News)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters and accidents
  • 2015 Missouri flooding
    • Record flooding along the Mississippi River and its tributaries that has closed major highways, forced evacuations, and overflowed levees, continues to threaten the Midwestern United States where at least 24 have died. The Mississippi is expected to crest in the next few days in Thebes, Illinois, at 47.5 feet, breaking the 1995 record by more than a foot and a half (46 cm). And now periods of below-freezing air will cause some flooded areas to turn icy. (Reuters) (AccuWeather) (Chicago Tribune)
  • Air Canada Flight 88, a scheduled flight from Shanghai to Toronto, diverts to Calgary International Airport after the aircraft, a Boeing 777, encountered violent turbulence. Twenty-one passengers, including three children, were taken to hospital. (CBC)
  • A fire breaks out at The Address Downtown Dubai hotel. Fourteen people are reported as injured, with one indirect casualty. (CNN)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
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