Portal:Current events/December 2010

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2010
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December

December 2010 was the twelfth and final month of that common year. The month, which began on a Wednesday, ended on a Friday after 31 days.

Portal:Current events

This is an archived version of Wikipedia's Current events Portal from December 2010.

Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Two walls collapse at the ancient Roman city of Pompeii during heavy rains, the third such incident in a month. (BBC) (Adnkronos)
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • 1 million free books are to be made available in the UK and Ireland on 5 March 2011; some booksellers object due to falling sales. (BBC) (The Guardian) (The Daily Telegraph)
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
  • United States diplomatic cables leak:
    • Amazon.com cuts off its access to the WikiLeaks website following "heavy political pressure" applied by Joe Lieberman, a senator in the United States. The move is compared to the censorship of Google by China. (The Guardian) (AFP via France24)
    • The United States thinks President of Sri Lanka Mahinda Rajapaksa was involved in a massacre of Tamils according to a leaked cable. (Al Jazeera)
    • The Irish foreign ministry objected to America's sending of Apache helicopters to Israel via Ireland during the Israel-Lebanon war in February 2006 without informing local authorities but Irish officials were warned that the U.S. would use facilities elsewhere, depriving the Irish economy of tens of millions of dollars. (Al Jazeera)
    • Specialists in espionage law say U.S. authorities would encounter "insurmountable legal hurdles" during any attempt to prosecute Julian Assange, even if he were to appear in the country. (Reuters via National Post)
  • WikiLeaks spokesperson Julian Assange calls for the resignation of Hillary Clinton "if it can be shown that she was responsible for ordering U.S. diplomatic figures to engage in espionage in the United Nations, in violation of the international covenants to which the U.S. has signed up". (TIME)
  • Julian Assange grants an interview to TIME in which he talks about secrecy, saying "we keep secret the identity of our sources" but that secrecy "shouldn't be used to cover up abuses". (TIME)
  • Iran completes the fueling of its nuclear reactor at Bushehr. (RIA Novosti) (Tehran Times)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Two Lebanese labourers are injured after the Israeli army detonates two of its espionage devices by remote control in the southern Lebanese city of Tyre. (AFP via Google News) (Daily Star - Lebanon)
  • Attacks against WikiLeaks, Julian Assange and The Guardian website:
    • As "massive" cyberwarfare against the WikiLeaks website continue, the website is forced to change its web address after EveryDNS kills its domain due to the disruption caused to its other customers by the attacks. United States authorities are accused of carrying out the cyber attacks against the website. (The Guardian) (BBC)
    • Spokesperson Julian Assange calls for Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper's former chief of staff Tom Flanagan to be charged with "incitement to commit murder" after Flanagan urged Barack Obama to "put out a contract" and "assassinate" Assange. Assange speaks of the precautions he has to take against such threats of death, with American politician Mike Huckabee also calling for executions to be carried out. (Toronto Star) (Al Jazeera)
    • Julian Assange gives a live question and answer session on the website of The Guardian newspaper. (The Guardian) (Al Jazeera)
    • The Guardian's web servers are "crippled" as the session is going live. (The Wall Street Journal)
    • The French Government places political pressure on its internet use governing body, warning of "consequences" for anyone assisting WikiLeaks in the country. OVH responds, saying "it's not up to politicians or OVH to decide the site's closure" and seeks legal advice from a judge. (The Guardian) (AFP via France24)
    • A court in Lahore dismisses a petition seeking a ban on the WikiLeaks website, with the judge ruling such a ban to be "unmaintainable" and that "We must bear the truth, no matter how harmful it is". (DAWN)
    • U.S. Congressman Ron Paul of Texas calls for WikiLeaks to receive similar protections to mainstream media, saying when "truth becomes treason, then we're in big trouble". (CBS News)
  • President Barack Obama makes a surprise visit to United States armed forces based in Afghanistan. (Reuters)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Spain closes four airports saying there is a shortage of air traffic controllers who are concerned about their pay and working conditions. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • The Spanish government holds an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss plans to raise the pension age and to sell off its stakes in the lottery and airports. (Al Jazeera)
  • Nissan starts selling the Leaf, one of the first mass market electric cars. (AP via Yahoo! News)
Disasters
  • 1984 Bhopal disaster: The Indian government launches a court case to more than double the compensation paid by U.S. chemical corporation Union Carbide on the anniversary of the leak from a Madhya Pradesh plant that killed thousands of people. (BBC)
  • The United Nations warns that the Haitian cholera epidemic could get worse. (BBC)
  • Up to 28 people die in northern and eastern Europe as a result of a cold spell with thousands stranded due to road and rail disruptions and airport closures. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
  • At least 17 mainly Iranian people are killed in a collision of two buses on a highway near the holy site of Najaf, Iraq. (Al Jazeera)
  • Heavy floods in the Balkans forces more than a thousand people to evacuate from their homes. (BBC)
  • A Queensland man is missing presumed dead in floodwaters in Bajool while parts of central New South Wales are declared disaster zones after a week of heavy rains in eastern Australia. (ABC News Australia)
International relations
Politics and elections
Science
Sport
  • There are mass celebrations on the streets of Doha, Qatar, following FIFA's announcement that the country of 1,696,563 people is to present the 2022 FIFA World Cup. (Al Jazeera)
Armed conflicts
  • Dozens of Easter Islanders are injured in conflict over ownership as riot police evict islanders from their ancestral home. (Al Jazeera)
Business and economy
  • The Spanish government imposes emergency measures unused since the end of military rule in 1975, threatening workers seeking better pay and working conditions with prosecution if they do not return to work. (BBC) (The Guardian) (Xinhua)
Disasters
  • Authorities in Ecuador order the evacuation of people from the slopes of the Tungurahua volcano after it begins spewing ash. (BBC) (AFP via Google News)
  • An aircraft crashes at Domodedovo airport in Moscow after undergoing multiple engine failure, with at least 2 deaths and 80 injuries. (RIA Novosti) (The Guardian) (The Hindu) (Xinhua) (AFP via The Sydney Morning Herald)
  • 10 Chinese sailors are missing and 14 others are rescued after the cargo ship MV Hong Wei founders off the southeast coast of China. (CNN)
  • Israeli police say negligence caused a large forest fire burning out of control in the north of the country that killed at least 40 people. (CBC)
International relations
  • United States diplomatic cables leak:
    • Reporters Without Borders condemns "the blocking, cyber-attacks and political pressure" against the WikiLeaks website, describing it as the first "attempt at the international community level to censor a website dedicated to the principle of transparency" and comparing the behaviour of France and the United States to that of China. American payment service provider PayPal cuts off the account the WikiLeaks website uses to collect donations. (Al Jazeera)
    • Wikileaks Facebook's fan page recently grew by about 100,000 fans daily, going from 300,000 to 700,000 fans in 4 days.(Beehivecity.com)
    • Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi flies to Sochi for unscheduled talks with Russian prime minister Vladimir Putin. This occurs hours after the release of U.S. cables focusing on the pair's relationship. (The Age)
    • New cables say Yemen allowed the United States access to its soil. (Al Jazeera)
    • New cables discuss "paranoia" concerning the UK's alleged "special relationship" with the United States. (BBC)
    • New cables allege that the Communist Party of China was paranoid about the Internet with Li Changchun, the party's propaganda chief, stepping up pressure on Google after finding material critical of him in a search. The same source also claims that CCP is active in hacking against its rivals, especially the United States. (The New York Times)
  • President of the Palestinian Authority Mahmoud Abbas speaks of the possibility of dissolving the Authority if Israel continues its construction on occupied Palestinian land in the West Bank, saying there is little point remaining "the president of an authority that doesn't exist". (Al Jazeera)
  • The Iranian government says the International Atomic Energy Agency spies on its nuclear program and reiterates its belief that the CIA, Mossad and MI6 murdered Majid Shahriari earlier this week. (BBC)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
  • FIFA executive committee member Franz Beckenbauer says Qatar ought to be allowed to host the 2022 FIFA World Cup, the first in the Middle East and in an Arab country, during winter in an unusual move. The event is usually held during summer months. (Al Jazeera)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Attacks against WikiLeaks, Julian Assange and his lawyers:
    • The WikiLeaks website is forced offline again. (OneIndia News)
    • Lawyers representing WikiLeaks spokesperson Julian Assange speak of being surveilled by members of the security services outside their own homes and say the United States Department of State is behaving "inappropriately" in its failure to respect attorney-client protocol. (The Guardian)
    • Bank officials attempt to shut down an account opened by Assange in Switzerland. (The Times of India)
    • Political science students at one American university are warned that their possibility of receiving state department jobs is under threat if they access the WikiLeaks website. (The Guardian)
    • Newly released cables quote President of the European Council Herman Van Rompuy's belief that American and NATO forces are destined to ultimately fail in the War in Afghanistan and that European troops are deployed there only in "deference" to the United States - "And if a Belgian gets killed, it would be over for Belgium right then". (Al Jazeera)
  • A blast at an army base in eastern Afghanistan kills at least two soldiers and two civilians. (rferl)
  • The Nigerian military acknowledges that raids to root out armed gangs in the Niger Delta may have killed civilians. (CNN) (AFP)
  • Over 100 people are killed in battles throughout Somalia between Islamist rebels and African Union forces over the past three days. (Press TV)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
  • At least 174 people are dead and 1.5 million homeless following floods in Colombia. (ABC)
  • 22 people are killed in a prairie fire in Daofu County, Sichuan, China. (China Daily)
  • At least 6 people are killed and 36 wounded after an explosion in the city of Kaili, Guizhou province, China. (BBC) (IOL) (China Daily)
  • 8 people are killed after a car collides with a group of cyclists in Italy. (BBC)
  • Hundreds of people evacuate the Australian town of Wagga Wagga as flood waters rise throughout New South Wales. (AAP via The Australian)
  • 7 people are rescued after becoming stranded for 8 days in a pub in England. (BBC)
  • Israeli and Palestinian firefighters say they have brought the 2010 Israel forest fire "under control". (Al Jazeera)
  • The corpse of a partially eaten 70-year-old female German tourist washes up on Sharm el-Sheikh, believed to have been killed by sharks in the fifth attack this week. (Al Jazeera)
International relations
Politics and elections
Science
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
International relations
  • Iran meets with six world powers in Geneva for talks concerning its nuclear program. (BBC)
  • United States diplomatic cables leak:
    • Newly released cables from the United States indicate former Prime Minister of Australia Kevin Rudd suggested the use of force against China if it could not be "successfully integrated" into the international community. The Australian government refuses to respond to the release. (ABC News)
    • A newly released cable from Hillary Clinton accuses rich people in Saudi Arabia of being "the most significant source of funding to Sunni terrorist groups worldwide" and that "it has been an ongoing challenge to persuade Saudi officials to treat terrorist financing emanating from Saudi Arabia as a strategic priority". (The Independent)
    • Newly released cables reveal American distrust both of Qatar and the country's Al Jazeera international news network, prompting Al Jazeera to release a statement saying that it has resisted pressure from both regional and international governments and "has never changed its bold editorial policies which remain guided by the principles of a free press". (Al Jazeera) (The Independent)
    • The cables also reveal that foreign envoys to China from India, Japan, the EU and some African countries complained about the country's "aggressive" nature and that it was "losing friends worldwide". (Indian Express)
  • Senior officials from Turkey and Israel meet in Geneva to resolve their differences following the Gaza flotilla raid in May. (BBC)
Law and crime
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • One child is killed and 20 people are injured in a bomb blast at a temple in Varanasi, northern India. (Hindustan Times) (Reuters)
Arts and culture
  • A copy of John James Audubon's Birds of America is sold at auction in London for a record £7.3 million ($10.3 million). (AP via Yahoo! News) (AFP via The Straits Times) (The Guardian) (The Independent)
Business and economy
Disasters
  • French epidemiologist Renaud Piarroux, working on behalf of the French and Haitian governments, points to "strong evidence" linking United Nations peacekeepers to Haiti's cholera outbreak. (Al Jazeera) (The Straits Times)
  • More than 76,000 people are left marooned following floods in Sri Lanka. (Xinhua)
  • A state of emergency is declared after a landslide in Colombia, with 37 corpses retrieved so far. (The Straits Times)
  • Hundreds of people are stranded in the United Kingdom as a cold spell continues. (BBC) (The Guardian)
  • Severe weather also continues in Ireland with water shortages in parts and public anger over incorrect weather forecasts. (Evening Herald) (RTÉ) (The Irish Times)
International relations
Law and crime
  • War on WikiLeaks and arrest of Julian Assange:
    • The U.S. government "declares war" on the WikiLeaks website. (CBS News)
    • Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, is arrested in London for alleged sexual misconduct in Sweden. (BBC) (Reuters)
    • The WikiLeaks website continues to release cables despite the arrest of Assange. (The Guardian)
    • District Judge Howard Riddle refuses to grant bail to Assange despite interventions from Jemima Khan, Ken Loach and John Pilger before a packed court No 1 at Westminster Magistrates Court. Another hearing is scheduled for 14 December. (The Guardian) (Al Jazeera)
    • U.S. senator Joe Lieberman tells Fox News that The New York Times and other news organisations may be investigated. (The Guardian)
    • The website of the Swedish prosecutor's office pursuing Assange is brought down by the Anonymous group. (The Straits Times)
  • A U.S. judge dismisses a lawsuit over the U.S. government putting American citizens on "capture or kill" lists. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Clashes between rival clans in northern Somalia kill around 35 people and injure 40 others. (Press TV)
  • North Korea launches apparent artillery drills as South Korean and American military officials hold talks. (Al Jazeera)
  • At least 18 people are killed during a bomb at a bus terminal in Kohat's main bazaar kills in Pakistan. (Al Jazeera) (CNN)
Arts and culture
  • John Lennon is celebrated on the 30th anniversary of his murder. (BBC)
  • The retired French electrician who recently revealed he had hundreds of Picassos in his possession announces another trove of his art is also in his possession. (AFP via ABC News)
  • Soul singer Aretha Franklin is reported to have pancreatic cancer. (Reuters via ABC News)
Disasters
International relations
  • United States diplomatic cables leak:
    • Newly released cables report that the British government feared Libya might reduce political relations if Abdelbaset al-Megrahi were to die in jail in Scotland. (AP via Herald Sun)
    • Newly released cables reveal America lobbied Russia in an attempt to ensure Visa and MasterCard were not "adversely affected" by new legislation earlier this year. Both companies recently suspended all payments to the WikiLeaks website, reportedly after coming under intense pressure from the U.S. government. (The Guardian)
    • Online group Anonymous announces the success of Operation Payback, bringing the website of American multinational corporation MasterCard into a state of paralysis after it shuts off donations to the WikiLeaks website. (The Guardian) (Al Jazeera)
    • Former Australian prime minister and current foreign minister Kevin Rudd questions U.S. security and holds America responsible for documents made public by the WikiLeaks website. These comments by Rudd, a "control freak" according to U.S. diplomats, are a departure from current prime minister Julia Gillard, who has previously blamed Julian Assange. (The Daily Telegraph)
    • An open letter is sent to Gillard requesting that she make a"strong statement" supporting Assange: signatories include renowned American scholar Noam Chomsky, Australian Greens Senator Bob Brown, army whistleblower Lance Collins and numerous Australian authors including Raimond Gaita, Christos Tsiolkas and Helen Garner. (Herald Sun)
    • The Washington Post reports that the WikiLeaks website is stronger than ever and has increased support among netizens despite widespread attempts to shut it down. (The Washington Post)
  • Israeli–Palestinian conflict:
  • Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf warns former rebel fighters not to get involved in the crisis in Côte d'Ivoire. (BBC)
Law and crime
  • Former U.S. vice-president Dick Cheney is charged over a bribery scheme involving oil services company Halliburton by Nigeria's anti-corruption agency. The charges relate to when he was the company's top executive. (Al Jazeera) (AFP via The Sydney Morning Herald)
  • Around 1,000 protesters block a key road in Moscow, Russia, following the killing of a fellow football fan blamed on a group from the North Caucasus. (The Moscow News) (BBC)
  • Tony Blair is recalled to give further evidence before the Iraq Inquiry after "gaps" concerning the legality of the Iraq War are identified in his evidence. Jack Straw and Lord Goldsmith are to return too. (Irish Examiner) (Daily Mail)
  • The International Criminal Court is to begin a preliminary investigation into war crimes by North Korea. (Herald Sun) (Yonhap)
  • India's Central Bureau of Investigation raids the homes of former telecommunications minister A. Raja, his family and associates in connection with a corruption scandal. (The Hindu) (BBC)
Politics and elections
Science
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Calisto Tanzi, the founder and former chief executive of multinational food corporation Parmalat, is sentenced to 18 years imprisonment for fraud. (BBC), (Dow Jones via the Australian)
  • Long-term unemployment sharply rises in Ireland. (RTÉ) (The Belfast Telegraph)
Disasters
International relations
  • The African Union suspends Côte d'Ivoire following the disputed presidential election. (African Press Agency) (BBC)
  • India is to complain to the United States after its ambassador, Meera Shankar, was pulled from a security line and patted down at an airport. (Indian Express) (BBC)
  • United States diplomatic cables leak:
    • Thousands of WikiLeaks supporters launch further and more intense denial-of-service attack against companies who have blacklisted the website. (PA via Google News) (Al Jazeera) (The Daily Telegraph) (The Guardian)
    • Newly released cables report that oil giant Royal Dutch Shell had "access to everything" inside "all relevant ministries" of the Nigerian government. (Al Jazeera) (The Hindu) (IOL) (Brisbane Times) (The Daily Telegraph)
    • Newly released cables reveal close U.S. monitoring of Chinese ties with Africa and the American belief that the Chinese are "a very aggressive and pernicious economic competitor with no morals" in their dealings with the Africans. (Al Jazeera) (AFP via iafrica) (BBC) (Times LIVE)
    • Australia – United States relations:
      • Australian Sports Minister Mark Arbib is named as a confidential source for the U.S. embassy, passing on information on the Australian Government. Melbourne Ports MP Michael Danby and former MP Bob McMullan have also contacted the embassy. (Herald Sun) (The Age) (The Sydney Morning Herald)
      • Arbib warned the United States about a possible challenge to Kevin Rudd's prime ministership as early as last year. (ABC News)
      • U.S. diplomats are reported to have observed in detail the rise of Julia Gillard, praising her for losing Labor Left allegiances and expressing the confident belief she would become Prime Minister of Australia over 8 months before she deposed Kevin Rudd. (The Sydney Morning Herald)
      • Gillard hardens her stance against the WikiLeaks website. (The Australian)
    • World media reaction to the diplomatic cables:
      • European media express disagreement with the fierce U.S. response to the release of the cables. (The New York Times)
      • The Pakistani media publish fake WikiLeaks cables which attack India. (The Guardian)
  • 2010 Nobel Peace Prize:
    • China blocks access to international news sites ahead of the ceremony for Liu Xiaobo on Friday. (BBC)
    • China issues its new "Confucius peace prize" to former Taiwanese Vice President Lien Chan, though he refused to collect it, adding he knew nothing of the award. (Malaysia Star) (Taipei Times) (Hindustan Times)
    • Colombia, Ukraine and the Philippines, who initially declined invitations to attend the ceremony, reverse their decision. (Times of India) (Colombia Reports)
  • A report by Transparency International suggests that corruption has worsened over the past three years worldwide. (Transparency International) (Al Jazeera) (BBC) (Deutsche Welle)
Law and crime
  • Detention of Julian Assange:
    • It is reported that the two Swedish women who have accused WikiLeaks spokesperson Julian Assange of committing "sex crimes" boasted about their "conquest" of him before calling police. (The Times of India)
    • People brandishing Julian Assange masks gather in central Brisbane, Australia, to protest his detention by British police, with a message of support being read from journalist John Pilger. (Nine News)
    • Assange's mother and son express concerns that he will not be afforded a fair trial. His mother says he had "come forward of his own free will but they have put him in the ring with his hands tied behind his back". (Daily Nation)
  • A national high-tech crime team in The Hague arrests a 16-year-old male they accuse of disrupting MasterCard and PayPal websites. Both companies previously cut off donations to the WikiLeaks website. (Financial Times) (AP via Toronto Star) (Herald Sun)
  • U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder announces that his country's justice department is "looking into" incidents which have disrupted websites opposed to WikiLeaks. (Bloomberg)
Politics
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Somali pirates hijack a Liberian ship 80 nautical miles east of the border between Tanzania and Mozambique, in their most southerly attack yet. (CNN)
  • At least 15 people are killed and several dozen others sustain wounds during a suicide attack at a Shia hospital in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa. (Al Jazeera)
  • Thai soldiers killed people at a Buddhist temple in Bangkok during demonstrations in May, leaked government documents demonstrate. (The Guardian)
  • 2010 UK student protests:
    • Prime Minister of the United Kingdom David Cameron criticises the "mob" which launched an attack upon the car of Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall as the couple were driven down Regent Street towards a Royal Variety performance in London last night. Protesters indicate the use of police brutality. (The Guardian) (CNN)
    • 20-year-old Alfie Meadows undergoes brain surgery after being beaten by a policeman wielding a truncheon while leaving an area outside Westminster Abbey as a demonstration against an increase in student fees was underway. (The Guardian) (Sky News) (Al Jazeera) (BBC) (Daily Mail)
    • A British mother questions why anti-terrorist officers removed her 12-year-old son from school to warn him against his own planned protest outside David Cameron's constituency office. (The Guardian)
  • An English exam questioning Indian crackdown on demonstrations in the disputed region of Kashmir leads to police arresting a college lecturer. (AP via The Guardian)
Arts and culture
Disasters
  • The United States "loses track" of 119,000 private planes, with uncertainty over who has access to them. (Al Jazeera) (The Hindu) (CNN)
  • A new archive of the genocide in Rwanda is unveiled in the capital Kigali. (Rwanda News Agency) (BBC)
International relations
  • A group of 26 ex-EU leaders has urged the union to impose sanctions on Israel for continuing to build settlements on occupied Palestinian territory. (BBC) (EUobserver) (The Guardian)
  • A ceremony is held in Norway to award the Nobel Peace Prize to Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo in absentia. (Reuters) (Al Jazeera) (BBC)
  • United States diplomatic cables leak: (Day 12 summary: The Guardian)
    • Newly released cables show American pharmaceutical company Pfizer hired investigators in a search for evidence of corruption allegedly committed by Michael Aondoakaa, then attorney-general of Nigeria. This occurred as Aondoakaa was engaged in legal action against Pfizer over a drug trial. (Al Jazeera)
    • Newly released cables suggest Burma may be building missile and nuclear sites with the help of North Korea. (BBC) (Al Jazeera)
    • It is reported that the U.S. military has issued a "Cyber Control Order" instructing its airmen to "immediately cease use of removable media on all systems, servers, and stand alone machines residing on SIPRNET". (CBS News)
    • The U.S. state of Virginia is reported to be Googling "WikiLeaks" more than any part of the country. (The Huffington Post)
    • Attacks against companies opposed to WikiLeaks:
      • The websites of the Dutch prosecutor's office and police come under denial-of-service attacks, with officials "probably" linking the incidents to yesterday's arrest in the country of a 16-year-old supporter of the WikiLeaks website. (AFP via The Sydney Morning Herald)
      • Supporters of the WikiLeaks website explain that they are not hackers but "average internet citizens" acting in response to perceived injustices against the website and that they "do not want to steal your personal information or credit card numbers". (BBC)
  • For the first time since World War II, German troops are stationed in France. (Yahoo! News)
Law and crime
  • Detention of Julian Assange:
    • Christine Assange, mother of the imprisoned WikiLeaks spokesperson Julian Assange, expresses her anger with the Australian government, especially Julia Gillard, on the Seven Network. (Sky News)
    • Assange is reported to have been denied the use of his own laptop and has to make do with daytime television which he objects to. (Sify)
    • Lawyers for Assange prepare for possible charges under America's Espionage Act. (The Guardian) (The Daily Telegraph)
  • Prosecutors in Italy open an investigation into allegations that Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi bought MPs before important votes. (The Guardian)
  • Prosecutors in Croatia issue an arrest warrant for former Prime Minister Ivo Sanader on suspected corruption charges. He is then arrested. (Al Jazeera) (AP) (Sify India)
  • Human rights campaigners object to a TV programme showing imprisoned Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani returning home. (The Guardian)
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • Inflation in China reaches a 28-month high, at 5.1%. (China Daily) (BBC)
  • Bolivia lowers its retirement age from 65 to 58 as other countries raise their retirement ages. (Al Jazeera)
Disasters and accidents
  • A house fire in Uttar Pradesh, northern India, kills five children. (Xinhua) (Sify India)
  • Due to recent floods in Venezuela, President Hugo Chávez announces the erection in his garden of a Bedouin tent given as a gift by Muammar al-Gaddafi from which he is to live and govern to make room for more homeless families in his presidential palace at Miraflores. 25 families made homeless by the disaster had already sought shelter there and Chávez has been personally supervising the provision of relief in the country. (BBC)
  • Eight fatal cases of A/H1N1 swine flu and two from seasonal flu are confirmed within six weeks in the United Kingdom. (AFP) (Daily Mail)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Disasters
International relations
  • Newly released cables from Australian intelligence show the intelligence assessment that charges of sodomy laid against Malaysian opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim are due to a "set up job" that he "walked into". Others refer to Malaysia as a "confused and dangerous" state, Thai politicians as corrupt and Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn as "very erratic and easily subject to influence", and Japan as a "big fat loser". (The Sydney Morning Herald)
Law and crime
  • Julian Assange's lawyer says American spying charges against her client are "imminent" despite seeming to have committed no crime in the country. She also reports that he is detained in solitary confinement with restricted access to lawyers. (The Times of India)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • A 2,400-year-old pot of soup is unearthed in China near the ancient capital Xi'an. (BBC) (People's Daily)
Business and economy
  • Brunei and Malaysia sign a deal to jointly explore and produce oil and gas off the coast of northern Borneo. (Malaysia Star)
  • Major British supermarkets and online stores stop taking orders in Scotland in the run up to Christmas, because of a backlog of deliveries caused by the recent adverse weather conditions. (BBC)
Disasters
Law and crime
International relations
  • Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erakat asks the European Union to recognize “two states (Israel and Palestine) along the 1967 borders". (Bloomberg)
  • Europe reaffirms its readiness to recognise a Palestinian state at an "appropriate" time, stopping short of outright recognition despite mounting pressure to break the Middle East impasse. (AFP)
  • Minni Minnawi, the only Darfur faction leader to sign the Darfur Peace Agreement with the Sudanese government, declares its failure and leaves his post. (Al Jazeera)
  • The Philippine parliament blocks a government effort to provide free condoms to poor people, amid a debate over funding for family planning. (Straits Times)
  • Protests by garment workers in Bangladesh over low wages spread to other areas of the country. (AFP)
  • OpenLeaks, a splinter group rivaling WikiLeaks, launches its website. (CNN)
Politics and elections
Science
Sports
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • The Philippine government says it will attempt to end the long-running communist insurgency "within three years", as it announces a resumption of peace talks with rebels. (Straits Times)
Business and economy
Disasters
  • At least 20 people are killed in a garment factory fire near the Bangladeshi capital Dhaka. (Al Jazeera) (Times of India)

Tornado in Aumsville, Oregon

International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Lehman Brothers bondholders, including hedge fund manager Paulson & Co., file a plan for the reorganization of that defunct broker-dealer, presenting the New York bankruptcy court with an alternative to the plan Lehman itself filed earlier in the year. (Reuters)
  • Ghana is to begin pumping its first oil since a discovery in an offshore field three years ago. (Ghana Broadcasting Corporation) (Times LIVE)
Disasters and accidents
International relations
  • Senegal recalls its ambassador to Iran, saying that Iran had not provided an adequate explanation for an arms shipment seized in Nigeria. (BBC) (Africa News)
  • Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao begins a trade visit to India. (BBC) (Times of India) (China Daily)
  • The United Nations votes to lift sanctions imposed on Iraq during the Saddam Hussein era. (BBC)
  • Palestinian firefighters who helped fight the Carmel fire in Israel last week are refused a permit to enter Israel for a ceremony in their honor. Officials said the firemen were denied entry as result of a "technical mishap". (Ynet)
Law and crime
Politics
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Science
  • The Galongla Tunnel, built at an altitude of 3,750 meters, is completed; it links Tibet's Mêdog county to the outside world. (SINA)
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Maoist rebels abduct seven villagers in the Purulia district of India's West Bengal state. (NDTV)
  • American missile attacks kill 57 suspected militants in a region in northwest Pakistan. (Washington Times) (Associated Press) (CNN)
Business and economy
Disasters
  • The death toll from the Christmas Island wreck rises to 30 with many still missing. (AP via Yahoo! News)
  • Further disruption is caused by blizzards and widespread ice in many parts of the United Kingdom, with more wintry weather forecast for the weekend. (BBC)
  • Cuba is hit by a cold wave, and some locations register 50-year record low temperatures. (Cuban News Agency) (Radio Cadena Agramonte)
International relations
Politics
Science
  • The Cook Islands announces the country's first ever HIV infection. (ABC Radio Australia)
  • China launches 7th Beidou navigation satellite. (Kunming via Xinhua)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
  • The United States' unemployment rate rises in 21 states, the highest number to report an increase since August. It falls in 15 states. (Washingtion Times)
  • Bank of America bans Wikileaks payments as a result of news of an upcoming release of information on banks in the United States that could leave an impact. (New York Post)
Disasters
  • At least 30 people drown after a boat capsizes in northeastern Bangladesh. (BBC) (Times of India)
  • A Chinese fishing boat capsizes during a scuffle with a South Korean coastguard ship, leaving one dead and two missing. (AP) (Channel News Asia)
  • Roads, railways and airports across the United Kingdom are severely affected by further heavy snowfall. Severe weather warnings have been issued for many areas. (BBC)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
Art and culture
Business and economy
  • Hundreds of small investors engage in protest activities in Dhaka following the steepest daily fall in the stock exchange. (BBC) (AFP via The Sydney Morning Herald)
  • 60 Minutes, an influential news program, runs a segment with Meredith Whitney a bank analyst credited with a timely bearish call in 2008, in which she predicts hundreds of millions of dollars worth of defaults by U.S. municipalities. (CNBC)
Disasters and accidents
  • At least 28 people are killed and dozens more are injured following an explosion on a PEMEX oil pipeline in San Martín Texmelucan, Puebla, Mexico. (BBC)
  • 15 people, including 9 nursing students, are killed while 12 others are injured in an blaze that gobbles up two buildings in Tuguegarao City, Cagayan province in northern Philippines. (Xinhua) (Philippine Inquirer) (BBC)
  • 8 people are seriously injured when a tour bus carrying a church group lost control, slides off a road and rolls onto its side on an icy highway in the U.S. state of Colorado. (CNN)
  • 3 people are killed as blizzards and freezing temperatures hit Italy. (Herald Sun)
  • Flights in and out of Heathrow Airport are at a virtual standstill as severe weather conditions continue across the United Kingdom. (BBC)
Law and crime
International relations
Politics and elections
Sport

(ESPN)

Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Pope Benedict XVI discusses sexual abuse of children by priests while dining with cardinals and bishops at his traditional Christmas audience. (BBC) (The China Post) (AFP via Philippine Daily Inquirer)
Business and economy
Disasters
  • Estimates of the death toll resulting from the boat disaster off Christmas Island rise as high as 48. (ABC News Australia)
  • At least 26 people are killed and several others are injured when a bus carrying tourists from Thailand overturns in Malaysia. (Bernama) (Thai News Agency)
  • Three people were killed and 23 wounded in a bomb attack on a bus in central Nairobi, Kenya. (AFP via Sydney Daily Telegraph)
  • A 6.5 magnitude earthquake hits southeastern Iran, near Bam with at least eleven people dead and hundreds injured. (Herald Sun), (CNN) (Los Angeles Times)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
  • 1,200 new species and varieties of sea creatures discovered during the first world survey of marine life are presented at a conference in Jerusalem, Israel. (Israel 21C) (The Jerusalem Post)
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
  • At least 39 people are killed and hundreds injured in a 6.5 magnitude earthquake in southeastern Iran. (Times of India)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
  • A total lunar eclipse will take place on December 20/21, 2010. (CNN)
  • In the United Kingdom an earthquake of magnitude 3.6 hits Cumbria and surrounding counties. (BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Pope Benedict XVI announces a BBC Radio 4 Christmas Eve message, the first such message for one of the countries he visited last year. (BBC)
Business and economics
  • Thousands of students march peacefully through Rome as part of nationwide demonstrations in Italy prior to a Senate vote which threatens education funds. (Al Jazeera) (BBC)
  • The World Bank stops financing Côte d'Ivoire. (Al Jazeera)
Disasters
  • A UN Development Programme report concludes that Aceh's recovery from the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami is "beyond anything imaginable six years ago" but that more needs to be done concerning poverty and natural disaster impact. (BBC)
  • The United States approves more than $4 billion assistance for rescuers and residents whose health was affected after the September 11 attacks in New York City in 2001. (Al Jazeera)
  • Ongoing flooding in California kills at least three people. (Hereald Sun) (New York Daily News) (MSNBC)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Hundreds of South Korean troops, tanks, helicopters and jet fighters gather 12 miles from the border with North Korea to stage one of South Korea's largest ever live fire military drills in a "show of force" before its neighbour. North Korea describes the exercises as "warmongering", and threatens a "sacred war". (BBC) (CNN) (Al Jazeera)
  • The United Nations says 173 people have been killed during post-election violence in the Ivory Coast. (BBC)
  • Two parcel bombs explode at the Swiss and Chilean embassies in central Rome, Italy. One person is seriously injured. Officials suspect that the perpetrators are from an Italian anarchist group. (The Australian) (swissinfo.ch) (The Christian Science Monitor)
Arts and culture
  • A survey indicates that almost one third of Britons believe they have a guardian angel. (The Independent) (Daily Mail) (Press Association via Google News)
Business and economy
  • China offers to help eurozone countries through the debt crisis. (BBC)
  • Banking giant Santander has admitted that a computer error has resulted in up to 35,000 people receiving other person's transactions details on their bank statement. (BBC)
Disasters
  • At least 20 people are buried by a landslide in the northern Colombian department of Santander. (Colombia Reports) (Xinhua)
International relations
  • China describes recent criticism of its control on the Catholic Church by the Vatican as "imprudent and ungrounded". (Times of India) (New York Times)
  • British MPs express concerns over whether the UK is "getting value for money" from its spending on education aid money in Africa. (BBC)
Law and crime
  • A court in Nice fines a male Algerian after convicting him of having insulted the French national flag last Tuesday. It is the first such penalty of its kind. (BBC)
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • TAAG Angola Airlines grounds its Boeing 777 planes following engine troubles with two of its fleet. (Angola Press) (BBC)
  • At least 24,000 workers at two plants in Vietnam go on strike over pay, bonuses and lunar new year holidays. (Straits Times)
  • South Africa is invited to join the BRIC group of emerging markets. (Reuters) (Bloomberg)
  • Japan's Cabinet approves a record ¥92.4 trillion budget for 2011. (Japan Times) (BBC)
Disasters and accidents
  • Large-scale disruption continues in Europe after heavy snowfalls. (BBC)
  • More than 30 people are killed after a bus plunged into a ravine in southwest Ecuador. (AFP) (CNN)
International relations
Law and crime
  • Indian police search for four people in Mumbai suspected of being members of the Lashkar-e-Taiba group responsible for the 2008 Mumbai attacks. (Times of India) (IOL)
  • New laws restricting car purchases in the Chinese capital Beijing come into force, in an attempt to combat serious traffic problems. (China Daily) (BBC)
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
Business and economy
Disasters
  • A magnitude 7.3 earthquake strikes Vanuatu. A tsunami warning is issued for the region and later cancelled after a minor tsunami was recorded. (CNN) (Xinhua) (Agence France-Presse via Google News)
  • An overcrowded bus plunges into ravine near El Carmen, Ecuador, killing 41. (The Australian)
International relations
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Science and technology
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • Wikileaks head Julian Assange says he has deals for his autobiography worth more than £1 million and needs the money to defend himself against allegations of sexual assault on two women in Sweden. (The Australian) (Al Jazeera) (The Times of India)
Business and economy
  • Protests against unemployment grow more violent as Tunisian security forces crack down on the residents in Sidi Bou Zid Governorate and a teenager is killed when police open fire. (Al Jazeera) (Ahram Online)
Disasters and accidents
  • Eight people are killed and 21 injured after a bus crash in Egypt. (CBC) (Hindustan Times)
  • A collision between a bus and a mini-truck kills 34 people and leaves 30 injured, near the town of Badaun in Uttar Pradesh state, in northern India. (The Australian) (Oneindia) (AP via Google News)
  • Waves of cold in Jammu and Kashmir show no signs of relenting, though the minimum temperature improves. (The Hindu)
  • The eastern United States is struck by more snow, with South Carolina receiving its first ever snow on Christmas Day. (BBC)
International relations
  • China and South Korea are to hold defence talks following tension on the Korean Peninsula. (China Daily) (BBC)
  • The Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Israel) announces that it will boycott Durban III (World Conference against Racism), the 2011 United Nations summit commemorating the tenth anniversary of the World Conference against Racism 2001, due to the conference's "anti-Semitic undertones and displays of hatred for Israel and the Jewish world," a day after the UN General Assembly approved a resolution, by a vote of 104 to 22, with 33 abstentions, to hold the summit in September 2011; Canada has already announced that it will also not attend, calling it a "charade". (AFP via Google News) (The Washington Post) (JTA)
  • The first humanitarian Asian flotilla, Asia to Gaza Solidarity Caravan of Asia 1, which left New Delhi with people of 15 differing nationalities aboard, leaves Damascus for Latakia, its final stop before it reaches its destination. (Tehran Times)
  • Thousands of people shouting "death to Israel" gather at Sarayburnu port in Istanbul to welcome back the MV Mavi Marmara, draped with a banner containing faces of the 9 people killed during the Gaza flotilla raid. (Al Jazeera) (Arutz Sheva)
  • Industry, Trade and Labour Minister of Israel Binyamin Ben-Eliezer responds to Ecuador's formal recognition of Palestine as an independent state by saying that the "entire world" could recognise a Palestinian state in the next year. (AFP via Google News)
  • United States diplomatic cables leak:
    • Newly released cables from July 2004 reveal that American diplomats panicked about a screening of the film Fahrenheit 9/11, which is critical of the U.S. government's response to the September 11 attacks. Diplomats stopped what they called a "potential fiasco" by intervening and contacting the offices of the New Zealand prime minister and Marian Hobbs, a government minister referred to as "Boo Boo" Hobbs by America. (Radio New Zealand International)
    • Newly released cables allege that world governments have sought assistance from the United States with wiretapping criminal and political adversaries, leading to denials and claims of "misunderstanding". (BBC)
    • Foreign Minister of Israel Avigdor Liberman states at a meeting with Israeli ambassadors that "classic diplomacy" is "not helpful" and that the right diplomacy is to say things "as is" due to the WikiLeaks website. Lieberman also attacks comments by the Foreign Minister of Turkey. (Ynetnews)
Law and crime
  • A court in Iran convicts a man of spying for Israel. His identity is to be revealed after the sentence is confirmed. (AFP via France24)
  • Egypt sends to Damascus a dossier of sensitive technical information involving details of an Israeli spy ring in Syria, including a high ranking chemical expert who assisted Israel for 13 years. (Ahram Online)
  • A Saudi woman, accused of attacking and torturing her Indonesian maid last month in a case that strained Saudi-Indonesia relations, now denies the charges, claiming that the maid tortured herself because she was “not normal.” (Asia One)
  • Dr Ezzeldeen Abu al-Aish files a lawsuit against Israel one day before the second anniversary of Israel's War on Gaza. Abu al-Aish's three daughters were killed at home by Israeli forces on live television on 16 January 2009 as the gynaecologist was doing an interview with Israel's Channel 10 television. (Al Jazeera)
  • Iranian authorities halt the impending execution of a Kurdish student convicted of "enmity against God", in connection with alleged membership and activities on behalf of the militant Party for a Free Life in Kurdistan (PJAK), following appeals by international organizations claiming that his trial was held behind closed doors and his lawyer was not allowed to be present. (Reuters) (The Jerusalem Post) (CNN) (BBC) (AFP)
  • Police in the UK say they are "satisfied" that a body found on Christmas Day is that of missing woman Joanna Yeates. (BBC)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • At least 3 people are killed and others are injured when a car bomb explodes near Kabul Bank in Kandahar. (Al Jazeera)
  • Riot police are deployed to the streets of Jos in central Nigeria following clashes between ethnic groups and a bombing on Christmas Eve. (The Daily Telegraph)
Business and economics
Disasters and accidents
  • At least seven people are killed and fifteen injured in a 100-vehicle pile up in southwest China. (CNN) (NDTV) (People's Daily)
  • A Seoul-based radio station targeting North Koreans reports that a train carrying birthday gifts for North Korean future leader Kim Jong-un derailed, in what it describes as a possible act of revolt by opponents. South Korea's National Intelligence Service (NIS) states that it is checking the report. (AFP via Google News) (Joongang Daily)
International relations
Law and crime
  • Former Russian oil tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky is found guilty of embezzlement in a second trial, which he described as politically motivated. (RIA Novosti) (The Hindu) (RTHK)
  • Allen Stanford's lawyers seek a two-year postponement of his trial and for his release from prison in the meanwhile. He is charged with running a $7 billion Ponzi scheme. (Reuters)
  • A Tel Aviv court sentences Israeli graphic designer Jonathan Pollak to three months imprisonment after convicting him of taking part in a "critical mass bicycle ride" demonstration highlighting the blockade of Gaza in January 2008. The Association for Civil Rights in Israel describes it as "an unusually harsh measurement" for a charge that normally does not see the perpetrator imprisoned. (The Guardian) (The New York Times)
Politics and elections
Armed conflicts and attacks
Arts and culture
  • A late Bronze Age grave of a Celtic princess has been unearthed in Heuneburg, Germany. Grave goods of Celtic jewellery made of gold, bronze, coal and amber have been discovered. (Der Spiegel (de))
  • Israeli archaeologists reportedly discover human remains from 400,000 years ago, challenging the theory that humans originated in Africa. (AFP via Google News) (The Hindu) (Press TV)
  • Sir Elton John and his partner David Furnish become parents after a surrogate mother from California gives birth to a son on Christmas Day. The boy is named Zachary Jackson Levon Furnish-John. (BBC)
Business and economy
  • 2010 Tunisian protests: Protests in Tunisia over unemployment and poor living conditions are criticized by President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali during a national television broadcast; he warns of "firm" punishment. (Al Jazeera) (Ahram Online) (AFP via Google News) (The Guardian)
  • Turkish construction workers employed in Israel protest in front of the Turkish Embassy in Tel Aviv over fears they may lose their jobs. (Today's Zaman)
Disasters and accidents

(Reuters) (The Associated Press) (NOLA.com)

International relations
Law and crime
  • A Chinese investigative reporter known for reporting on sensitive issues dies after being attacked by six men. (RTHK) (Philippine Inquirer)
  • Nepal amends legislation allowing children with disabilities to be adopted abroad. (The Straits Times)
  • The UK's Avon and Somerset Police launch a murder investigation after a post mortem into the death of Joanna Yeates concludes that she had been strangled. (BBC)
Politics
  • Kuwaiti Prime Minister Nasser Mohammed Al-Ahmed Al-Sabah is grilled by MPs over clashes between riot police and protesters at an opposition rally earlier this month. (Al Jazeera)
  • The UK Government defends a decision not to include children under the age of five in this year's flu vaccination programme, saying the decision is for medical and not financial reasons. (BBC)
  • 33 leading forensic scientists have expressed concerns about the UK Government's plans to close the Forensic Science Service, saying that the justice system will take a "backward step" as a consequence. (BBC)
  • The UK Government gives the go-ahead to plans to allow popular online petitions to be debated in Parliament within a year. (BBC)
Armed conflicts and attacks
Business and economy
Disasters and accidents
International relations
  • A proposed draft resolution calling on the United Nations Security Council to criticise the construction of settlements by Israel is obtained by the Associated Press. (Al Jazeera)
  • An open letter from about 30 rabbi wives causes controversy due to its call for Israeli girls not to date Arabs or work in places that employ non-jews, three weeks after a similar letter urged Jews not to engage in property trade with non-Jews. (CNN) (ABC News Australia)
  • The United States revokes the visa for Bernardo Álvarez Herrera, the Venezuelan ambassador to the country. (Al Jazeera)
  • Côte d'Ivoire President Laurent Gbagbo refuses to step down after a meeting with other African leaders. (IOL) (AP via Google News)
  • Seven Thais, including a MP, are arrested after illegally crossing the border into Cambodia. (The Straits Times) (Taiwan News)
Law and crime
Politics and elections
Sport
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • Côte d'Ivoire's ambassador to the United Nations, Youssoufou Bamba, says the country is on the "brink of genocide". (Reuters)
  • Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir says the government will withdraw from peace talks with rebels from Darfur unless a deal is reached this week. (Al Jazeera)
  • 2 people are killed and 18 others are wounded during bomb attacks on minority Christian homes in various parts of Baghdad. (Al Jazeera)
  • An early morning bomb explodes before two courthouses in Athens; there are no injuries. (Der Spiegel) (Xinhua) (France24) (The New York Times via Indian Express)
  • A bomb explodes at the Greek Embassy in Buenos Aires; there are no injuries. Some windows are broken. (CNN)
Arts and culture
International relations
  • A diplomatic cable newly released from the British National Archives, dated 1980, claims that Israel would be "ready to use their atomic weapon" in any further war against its adversaries.(AFP via Google News) (Ynetnews) (Morning Star)(ABC News)(The Jerusalem Post)
  • An international aid convoy from Asia enters Gaza, though Iranian and Jordanian members of the flotilla are denied entry and generators donated by Iran are banned too. (The Jerusalem Post)
  • Israeli forces arrest Hamas MP Khalil Ar-Rabai after surrounding his home in the early morning in the southern West Bank town of Yatta. The destruction of family property is also reported. (Ma'an) (AFP via Google News) (Press TV)
  • The Yemeni government releases at least 428 Houthi northern rebels as part of a ceasefire mediated by Qatar in return for 10 military vehicles. (Al Jazeera)
  • Thailand urges Cambodia to release seven of its citizens–including an MP–arrested after crossing their mutual border. (The Straits Times)
Law and crime
Politics
Armed conflicts and attacks
  • A pre-dawn bomb explodes outside a closed night club in Athens; there are no injuries. (Press Association via Google News)
  • A bomb explodes in the Nigerian capital Abuja, killing four people. (Times Live South Africa)
  • A protestor dies of his injuries in Tunisia as protests continue across the country over unemployment and poor living conditions. (Al Jazeera)
Arts and culture
Business and economy
  • Estonia, one of the Baltic republics of the former Soviet Union, adopts the euro as its official currency, becoming the 17th country to do so. (Reuters)
Disasters
Law and crime
  • Three Tibetan writers, detained earlier this year by Chinese authorities, are sentenced to jail terms of three to four years for "inciting activities to split the nation” (RFA)
Politics
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References

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