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Portal:Anglicanism

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A map showing the provinces of the Anglican Communion (blue). Also shown are the churches in full communion with the Anglicans: The churches of the Porvoo Communion (green) and the Union of Utrecht (red)

Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a worldwide affiliation of Christian churches. There is no single "Anglican Church" with universal juridical authority, since each national or regional church has full autonomy. As the name suggests, the communion is an association of churches in full communion with the Archbishop of Canterbury. With an estimated 80 million members, the Anglican Communion is the third largest communion in the world, after the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches.

Anglicanism, in its structures, theology and forms of worship, is understood as a distinct Christian tradition representing a middle ground between Roman Catholicism and Protestantism and, as such, is often referred to as being a via media ("middle way") between these traditions. Anglicans uphold the Catholic and Apostolic faith and follow the teachings of Jesus Christ. In practice Anglicans believe this is revealed in Holy Scripture and the creeds and interpret these in light of Christian tradition, scholarship, reason and experience.

One definition of the Anglican Communion is: "The 1930 Lambeth Conference described the Anglican Communion as a 'fellowship, within the one holy catholic and apostolic church, of those duly constituted dioceses, provinces or regional churches in communion with the see of Canterbury.'" - Colin Buchanan, Historical Dictionary of Anglicanism

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Chester Cathedral
Chester Cathedral is in the city of Chester, Cheshire, England. It is the mother church of the Diocese of Chester, dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building, which developed from the church of St Werburgh's Abbey. The former monastic buildings lie to the north of the cathedral and are also listed Grade I. Additions and modifications were made to these buildings over the centuries and the cathedral underwent a series of major restorations in the 19th century. A free-standing bell-tower was built in the 20th century. The cathedral continues to be active as a place of worship, and as a venue for concerts and exhibitions. The cathedral and the former monastic buildings are a major visitor attraction.

The cathedral is built in red sandstone, to a cruciform plan. It consists of a nave with a clerestory, a northwest tower, a consistory court at the southwest angle of the nave, a south porch, a central tower, south and north transepts, a choir with clerestory, a high altar, a Lady Chapel and other chapels. Most of the external structure is the result of 19th-century restorations.

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St Giles, Wormshill

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Samuel Johnson c. 1772,painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds
Samuel Johnson (18 September 1709 [O.S. 7 September] – 13 December 1784), often referred to as Dr Johnson, was a British author who made lasting contributions to English literature as a poet, essayist, moralist, literary critic, biographer, editor and lexicographer. Johnson was a devout Anglican and committed Tory, and has been described as "arguably the most distinguished man of letters in English history". He is also the subject of "the most famous single work of biographical art in the whole of literature": James Boswell's Life of Samuel Johnson.

Johnson's Anglican morality permeated his works, and he would write on moral topics with such authority and in a trusting manner. However, He did not let his own faith prejudice him against others, and had respect for those of other denominations who demonstrated a commitment to Christ's teachings. Although Johnson respected John Milton's poetry, he could not tolerate Milton's Puritan and Republican beliefs, feeling that they were contrary to Anglicanism. After nine years of work, Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language was published in 1755; it had a far-reaching effect on Modern English and has been described as "one of the greatest single achievements of scholarship. After a series of illnesses he died on the evening of 13 December 1784, and was buried in Westminster Abbey. In the years following his death, Johnson began to be recognised as having had a lasting effect on literary criticism, and even as the only great critic of English literature.

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