Portal:Ancient Near East

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

 
The Ancient Near East Portal

{{{title}}}

Selected article

Faravahar
Zoroastrianism is an ancient Persian religion and philosophy based on the teachings ascribed to the prophet Zoroaster (Zarathustra, Zartosht). The Zoroastrian Magi were an important priestly class in the Medean and Achaemenid empires, the creed becoming the dominant religion in the Achaemenid Empire. Zoroastrianism is uniquely important in the history of religion because of its possible formative links to both Western and Eastern religious traditions. As "the oldest of the revealed credal religions", Zoroastrianism "probably had more influence on mankind directly or indirectly than any other faith" (Mary Boyce, 1979).

The Avesta is the collection of the sacred texts of Zoroastrianism; the most ancient are written in an old or Gathic Avestan language, and the majority of the texts are probably from the Achaemenid era (648–330 BC).

Read more...

ArchiveSuggest

{{{title}}}

Selected biography

Achaemenid Empire at the end of Artaxerxes III's reign.
Artaxerxes III Ochus (Old Persian: Artaxšaçrā, reigned 358 – 338 BC) was the eleventh king of the Achaemenid Dynasty and the first Pharaoh of the 31st dynasty of Egypt. Before ascending the throne he was a satrap and commander of his father Artaxerxes II's army. Artaxerxes III came to power after one of his brothers was executed, another committed suicide, the last brother was murdered and his father died at the age of 90. Soon after becoming king, Artaxerxes murdered all the royal family to secure his place on the throne.

After ascending the throne, he started two major campaigns against Egypt. The first campaign failed, and was followed by rebellions throughout the western empire. However, in 343 BC, he defeated Nectanebo II, the Pharaoh of Egypt, driving him from the country, and stopping a revolt in Phoenicia on the way. Later, he countered Philip II of Macedon who was gaining power in Greece.

In his later life, he renewed building activity at Persepolis, erecting a new palace and building his tomb. It is generally assumed he was poisoned by his minister Bagoas, but a cuneiform tablet (now in the British Museum) suggests he died of natural causes.

Read more...

ArchiveSuggest

{{{title}}}

Selected picture

Great Ziggurat of Ur
Credit: Tla2006
Great Ziggurat of Ur
Sumer, Third Dynasty of Ur, ca. 2100 BC

Read more...

ArchiveSuggest

{{{title}}}

Did you know...

Nabonidus Cylinder
...that the Hurrian language and the Urartian language are proposed to be distantly related to the modern Armenian language?

...that the Aramaic language, the lingua franca of the ancient Near East in Biblical times is still spoken as a first language today?

...that the syllabic cuneiform script was adapted to create a phonetic alphabet twice, for the Ugaritic language and for the Old Persian language?

ArchiveSuggest
Related Portals

History
portal
    Archaeology
portal
    Ancient Egypt
portal
    Languages
portal
    Military history
portal
    Mythology
portal
Portal:History Portal:Archaeology Portal:Ancient Egypt Portal:Languages Portal:Military history Portal:Mythology


Bible
portal
    Judaism
portal
    Zoroastrianism
portal

Portal:Bible

Portal:Judaism

Portal:Zoroastrianism


Portal:Literature Portal:Political science Portal:Law Portal:Visual arts Portal:Architecture Portal:Mathematics Portal:Astronomy Portal:Medicine
Literature
portal
    Political science
portal
    Law
portal
    Visual arts
portal
    Architecture
portal
    Mathematics
portal
    Astronomy
portal
    Medicine
portal

The following Wikimedia Foundation sister projects provide more on this subject:

Wikibooks
Books

Commons
Media

Wikinews 
News

Wikiquote 
Quotations

Wikisource 
Texts

Wikiversity
Learning resources

Wiktionary 
Definitions

Wikidata 
Database

Purge server cache

Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Portal:Ancient_Near_East&oldid=854550147"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Ancient_Near_East
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Portal:Ancient Near East"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA