Portal:Aesthetics

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Aesthetics Portal
a portal for Wikipedia's
Aesthetics resources.
Article · Category ·Task force ·Outline ·Index

Aesthetics

Aesthetics (also spelled æsthetics) is commonly known as the study of sensory or sensori-emotional values; sometimes called judgments of sentiment and taste.[1] More broadly, scholars in the field define aesthetics as "critical reflection on art, culture and nature."[2][3] Aesthetics is a subdiscipline of axiology, a branch of philosophy, and is closely associated with the philosophy of art.[4] Aesthetics studies new ways of seeing and of perceiving the world.[5]

More about aesthetics...
Show new selections below (purge)

Selected article

The Scream by Edvard Munch (1893) which inspired 20th century Expressionists
Expressionism was a cultural movement originating in Germany at the start of the 20th-century as a reaction to positivism and other artistic movements such as naturalism and impressionism.[6] It sought to express the meaning of "being alive"[7] and emotional experience rather than physical reality.[7][8] It is the tendency of an artist to distort reality for an emotional effect; it is a subjective art form. Expressionism is exhibited in many art forms, including painting, literature, theatre, film, architecture and music. The term often implies emotional angst. In a general sense, painters such as Matthias Grünewald and El Greco can be called expressionist, though in practice, the term is applied mainly to 20th century works.

Selected biography

Hegel portrait by Schlesinger 1831.jpg
Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (German pronunciation: [ˈɡeɔʁk ˈvɪlhɛlm ˈfʁiːdʁɪç ˈheːɡəl]) (August 27, 1770 – November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher, and with Johann Gottlieb Fichte and Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Schelling, one of the creators of German Idealism. Hegel influenced writers of widely varying positions, including both his admirers (Bauer, Feuerbach, Marx, Bradley, Dewey, Sartre, Küng, Kojève, Žižek), and his detractors (Schelling, Kierkegaard, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Peirce, Russell). Hegel developed a comprehensive philosophical framework, or "system", to account in an integrated and developmental way for the relation of mind and nature, the subject and object of knowledge, and psychology, the state, history, art, religion, and philosophy. In particular, he developed a concept of mind or spirit that manifested itself in a set of contradictions and oppositions that it ultimately integrated and united, such as those between nature and freedom, and immanence and transcendence, without eliminating either pole or reducing it to the other. His influential conceptions are of speculative logic or "dialectic," "absolute idealism," "Spirit," negativity, sublation (Aufhebung in German), the "Master/Slave" dialectic, "ethical life," and the importance of history.

[[|More...]]

Selected picture

Aesthetica.png
Credit:

Baumgarten appropriated the word aesthetics, which had always meant sensation, to mean taste or "sense" of beauty. In so doing, he gave the word a different significance, thereby inventing its modern usage. The word had been used differently since the time of the ancient Greeks to mean the ability to receive stimulation from one or more of the five bodily senses.

Did you know?

Topics

Categories

Related portals

Things to do

Requested articles: aesthetic experience · aesthetic judgment · aesthetic properties · philosophy of art (currently a redirect) · artistic form · artistic style (currently a redirect) · artistic value · nature of art · ontology of art · concrete object (currently a redirect) · Rapture (aesthetics) · reception (currently a disambiguation page with no aesthetics)

Wikimedia

Aesthetics on Wikinews     Aesthetics on Wikiquote     Aesthetics on Wikibooks     Aesthetics on Wiktionary     Aesthetics on Commons
News Quotations Manuals & Texts Definitions Images


  1. ^ Zangwill, Nick. "Aesthetic Judgment", Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 02-28-2003/10-22-2007. Retrieved 07-24-2008.
  2. ^ Kelly (1998) p. ix
  3. ^ Review by Tom Riedel (Regis University)
  4. ^ Bruyn, Professor Severyn T. "Art and Aesthetics in Action", Boston College, 2002. Retrieved 07-22-2008.
  5. ^ Freeman, Lindsey (Phd) Remembering Debord cannon-beach.net
  6. ^ Garzanti, Aldo (1974) [1972]. Enciclopedia Garzanti della letteratura (in Italian). Milan: Guido Villa. p. 963.  page 241
  7. ^ a b Victorino Tejera, 1966, pages 85,140, Art and Human Intelligence, Vision Press Limited, London
  8. ^ The Oxford Illustratd Dictionary, 1976 edition, page 294
  9. ^ Clement Greenberg, “On Modernist Painting”.

Purge server cache

Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Portal:Aesthetics&oldid=646957678"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portal:Aesthetics
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Portal:Aesthetics"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA