Philip N. Cohen

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Philip N. Cohen
Philip N Cohen3.jpg
Born 1967 (age 50–51)
Nationality American
Alma mater University of Michigan (BA); University of Massachusetts (MA in Sociology); University of Maryland (PhD in Sociology)
Scientific career
Fields Sociology and demography
Institutions University of California, Irvine (1999-2005), University of North Carolina (2005-2011), University of Maryland (2011-)

Philip N. Cohen is an American sociologist. He is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park.,[1] and director of SocArXiv, an open archive of the social sciences.[2]

Career

Cohen graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in American Culture, from the University of Massachusetts with an M.A. in Sociology, and from the University of Maryland with a Ph.D. in Sociology. His previous faculty positions were at the University of North Carolina and the University of California, Irvine[3]

He is a sociologist and demographer who works in the areas of families and inequality, social demography, and social inequality. His concerns include gender and race/ethnic segregation in occupations, gender and authority, unpaid housework and care work, health disparities, and demographic measurement.[4]

He was formerly chair of the American Sociological Association section on Sociology of the Family.[5] He also is an Associate of the Maryland Population Research Center,[6] and was formerly secretary-treasurer of the American Sociological Association's Population Section.[7] He was co-editor, with Syed Ali, of Contexts, the quarterly magazine of the American Sociological Association, from 2014 to 2017.

Books

Cohen has written two books:

  • The Family: Diversity, Inequality, and Social Change, first published in 2014 by W. W. Norton & Company; the second edition was published in 2018.[8]
  • Enduring Bonds: Inequality, Marriage, Parenting, and Everything Else That Makes Families Great and Terrible, published in 2018 by the University of California Press.[9]

He is co-editor, with Syed Ali, of The Contexts Reader, a collection of essays from the magazine Contexts, the quarterly magazine of the American Sociological Association.[10]

Research

Cohen's paper on divorce, "The Coming Divorce Decline,"[11] reported a drop in U.S. divorce rates from 2008 to 2016, and predicted further declines in the coming years. It was reported by Bloomberg News,[12] the Today show,[13] Buzzfeed,[14] and the Atlantic.[15]

His work on labor market inequality has focused on race/ethnic and gender inequality in the United States. On race, he has published in the American Journal of Sociology[16] (with Matt Huffman) and Social Forces,[17] assessing the relationship between demographic composition of labor markets and patterns of inequality.

In the area of gender inequality, his research (with Matt Huffman) has addressed occupational segregation and gender devaluation[18] and the effects of women in workplace management positions.[19][20] Alone as well as with a number of different co-authors, he has published research on the gender division of household labor.[21][22][23][24]

On family structure, he has addressed issues of measurement, including how to identify cohabiting couples in U.S. Census data.,[25] and the language used for marriage (homogamy and heterogamy).[26]

On health disparities, he has studied disability rates among adopted children,[27] the living arrangements of children with disabilities,[28] the relationship between parental age and childhood disability,[29] and race/ethnic disparities in infant mortality.[30]

Some of Cohen's research is part of the tradition of intersectionality, including his work on the American women's suffrage movement;[31] and on the relationship between population composition and inequality by race, class and gender.[32]

Congressional Testimony

In 2007, Cohen testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, on equal pay for women workers.[33] The legislation under consideration at that hearing eventually became the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act of 2009.

Public Work

Cohen has been the author of the Family Inequality blog since 2009.[34]

His writing has appeared in the New York Times Sunday Review,[35] the Washington Post,[36] The Chronicle of Higher Education,[37] Sociological Images,[38] The Atlantic,[39] The Daily Beast,[40] Boston Review,[41] Huffington Post,[42] Time,[43] Pacific Standard,[44] LSE Impact Blog,[45] The Conversation,[46] and Salon.[47]

He has also contributed to news reports for such sources as the New York Times, Time magazine, NPR, the Washington Post, MSNBC and Vox.com.[48]

In 2011 he served as a consultant to the United States Census Bureau for its release of the first enumeration of same-sex married couples from the 2010 decennial census.[49]

Cohen is an advocate for open scholarship and open access for academic research.[50] He organized SocArXiv, an open research repository for the social sciences.[51] SocArXiv launched Open Scholarship for the Social Sciences (O3S), a conference at the University of Maryland, in 2017.[52]

He is a plaintiff in the lawsuit Knight First Amendment Institute v. Trump, filed July 11, 2017. In the lawsuit, a group of Twitter users blocked by U.S. President Donald Trump's account alleged that this blocking was a violation of their First Amendment rights.[53] The case was decided in the plaintiffs' favor on May 23, 2018.[54]

References

  1. ^ Philip N. Cohen (University of Maryland)
  2. ^ SocArXiv
  3. ^ Philip N. Cohen
  4. ^ Google Scholar list of publications
  5. ^ ASA Family Section webpage
  6. ^ Maryland Population Research Center
  7. ^ ASA Population Section
  8. ^ The Family: Diversity, Inequality, and Social Change at Norton
  9. ^ Enduring Bonds at University of California Press
  10. ^ The Contexts Reader at W. W. Norton.
  11. ^ Cohen, Philip N. (2018). "The Coming Divorce Decline". SocArXiv. doi:10.31235/osf.io/h2sk6.
  12. ^ "Millennials Are Causing the U.S. Divorce Rate to Plummet". Bloomberg News. September 25, 2018. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  13. ^ "Why millennials are being credited with dropping divorce rate". Today. September 26, 2018. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  14. ^ "Millennials Are Being Blamed For "Killing" Divorce, And The Jokes Basically Wrote Themselves". Buzzfeed. September 26, 2018. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  15. ^ "The Not-So-Great Reason Divorce Rates Are Declining". The Atlantic. September 25, 2018. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
  16. ^ Huffman, Matt L.; Cohen, Philip N. (2004). "Racial Wage Inequality: Job Segregation and Devaluation Across U.S. Labor Markets". American Journal of Sociology. 109 (4): 902–936. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.560.2662. doi:10.1086/378928. JSTOR 10.1086/378928.
  17. ^ Cohen, Philip N (1998). "Black Concentration Effects on Black-White and Gender Inequality: Multilevel Analysis for U.S. Metropolitan Areas". Social Forces. 77 (1): 207–229. doi:10.1093/sf/77.1.207. JSTOR 3006015.
  18. ^ Cohen, Philip N.; Huffman, Matt L. (2003). "Individuals, Jobs, and Labor Markets: The Devaluation of Women's Work". American Sociological Review. 68 (3): 443–63. doi:10.2307/1519732. JSTOR 1519732.
  19. ^ Cohen, Philip N.; Huffman, Matt L. (2007). "Working for the Woman? Female Managers and the Gender Wage Gap". American Sociological Review. 72 (5): 681–704. doi:10.1177/000312240707200502.
  20. ^ Huffman, Matt L.; Cohen, Philip N.; Pearlman, Jessica (2010). "Engendering Change: Organizational Dynamics and Workplace Gender Segregation, 1975-2005". Administrative Science Quarterly. 55 (2): 255–277. doi:10.2189/asqu.2010.55.2.255.
  21. ^ Cohen, Philip N (2004). "The Gender Division of Labor: 'Keeping House' and Occupational Segregation in the United States". Gender and Society. 18 (2): 239–252. doi:10.1177/0891243203262037. JSTOR 4149435.
  22. ^ Batalova, Jeanne A. (2002). "Premarital Cohabitation and Housework: Couples in Cross-National Perspective". Journal of Marriage and Family. 64: 743–755. doi:10.1111/j.1741-3737.2002.00743.x.
  23. ^ Fuwa, Makiko (2007). "Housework and social policy". Social Science Research. 36: 512–530. doi:10.1016/j.ssresearch.2006.04.005.
  24. ^ Geist, Claudia (2011). "Headed Toward Equality? Housework Change in Comparative Perspective". Journal of Marriage and Family. 73: 832–844. doi:10.1111/j.1741-3737.2011.00850.x.
  25. ^ Casper, Lynne M.; Cohen, Philip N. (2000). "How Does POSSLQ Measure Up? Historical Estimates of Cohabitation". Demography. 37 (2): 237–45. doi:10.2307/2648125. JSTOR 2648125.
  26. ^ Cohen, Philip N. (2011). "Homogamy Unmodified". Journal of Family Theory & Review. 3: 47–51. doi:10.1111/j.1756-2589.2010.00080.x.
  27. ^ Kreider, Rose; Cohen, Philip N. (2009). "Disability Among Internationally Adopted Children in the United States". Pediatrics. 124: 1311–1318. doi:10.1542/peds.2008-3206.
  28. ^ Cohen, Philip N. (2006). "Gendered Living Arrangements Among Children With Disabilities". Journal of Marriage and Family. 68: 630–638. doi:10.1111/j.1741-3737.2006.00279.x.
  29. ^ Cohen, Philip N (2014). "Parental Age and Cognitive Disability among Children in the United States". Sociological Science. 1: 102–110. doi:10.15195/v1.a8.
  30. ^ Cohen, Philip N (2016). "Maternal Age and Infant Mortality for White, Black, and Mexican Mothers in the United States". Sociological Science. 3: 32–38. doi:10.15195/v3.a2.
  31. ^ Cohen, Philip N. (1996). "Nationalism and Suffrage: Gender Struggle in Nation-Building America". Signs. 21 (3): 707–727. doi:10.1086/495103. JSTOR 3175176.
  32. ^ Cohen, Philip N. (2001). "Race, Class, and Labor Markets: The White Working Class and Racial Composition of U.S. Metropolitan Areas". Social Science Research. 30: 146–169. doi:10.1006/ssre.2000.0693.
  33. ^ Senate HELP Committee testimony
  34. ^ Family Inequality blog
  35. ^ Philip Cohen op-ed in the New York Times Sunday Review
  36. ^ Philip Cohen op-ed in Washington Post
  37. ^ Philip Cohen op-ed in The Chronicle of Higher Education
  38. ^ Philip Cohen posts at Sociological Images
  39. ^ Philip Cohen author profile at TheAtlantic.com
  40. ^ Philip Cohen author profile at thedailybeast.com
  41. ^ Philip Cohen contributions to Boston Review
  42. ^ Philip Cohen author profile at Huffington Post
  43. ^ Philip Cohen author profile at Time.com
  44. ^ Philip Cohen author profile at Pacific Standard,
  45. ^ Philip Cohen essay on LSE Impact Blog,
  46. ^ Philip Cohen author profile at The Conversation
  47. ^ Philip Cohen author profile at Salon
  48. ^ List of media references
  49. ^ Census Bureau news release
  50. ^ Philip Cohen essay on SocOpen.org
  51. ^ SocArXiv website
  52. ^ O3S website
  53. ^ Neumeister, Larry (July 11, 2017). "Trump sued for blocking some of his critics on Twitter". The Washington Post. Associated Press. Retrieved July 12, 2017.
  54. ^ "Trump's Blocking of Twitter Users Is Unconstitutional, Judge Says". The New York Times. May 23, 2018. Retrieved May 23, 2018.
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