Peter McIntyre (architect)

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Peter McIntyre
Peter McIntyre - McIntyre River Residence.JPG
Peter McIntyre
Born (1927-08-24)24 August 1927[1]
Melbourne, Australia
Alma mater Trinity Grammar School
Years active 1950–present
Spouse(s) Dione

Peter McIntyre (born 24 August 1927) is an Australian architect and educator.

Biography

Educated at Trinity Grammar School, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology and Melbourne University, he founded a practice in 1950 that combined modern, high-technology materials with concern for "emotional functionalism," or the impact of the built environment on its occupants. His design for an environmentally adapted Mallee Hospital was lauded by critic Robin Boyd as the beginning of a new Australian architecture. In 1953, he founded the McIntyre Partnership Pty Ltd. where he served as practice director, principal and senior partner.

McIntyre formed a partnership with architects John and Phyllis Murphy and Kevin Borland and in collaboration with engineering consultant Bill Irwin, they designed the Melbourne Olympic Swimming pool in 1952. He was also the architect for the redevelopment of the pool to the Lexus Centre.[2] In 1972, McIntyre formed an additional partnership with George Connor and Donald Wolbrink and form International PlanningCollaborative (Interplan). He wrote the 1973 Strategy Plan for the City of Melbourne, which limited high rise development to its eastern and western shoulders. His major projects include Melbourne's Parliament Station, The Jam Factory Complex in South Yarra, the Westfield Knox in Wantirna South and the creation of the Dinner Plain alpine village near Mount Hotham, Victoria.[3] He was the Professor of Architecture at Melbourne University between 1988 and 1992 and has won numerous awards. His wife Dione is also an architect.[4]

Architectural career outlines

  • 1999 Active Practice Director, McIntyre Partnership Pty Ltd
  • 1994 Appointed Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Architects
  • 1994 Appointed Emeritus Professor of Architecture, The University of Melbourne
  • 1993 Conferred as Doctor of Architecture, honoris causa
  • 1990 Awarded RAIA Gold Medal
  • 1984 Chairman, Board of Directors, Dinner Plain Pty Ltd
  • 1982 Awarded Officer of the Order of Australia
  • 1987 Appointed to the Chair of Architecture, The University of Melbourne
  • 1974 Senior Partner, McIntyre Partnership Pty Ltd
  • 1973-74 President, Royal Australian Institute of Architects
  • 1972 Formed additional partnership with George Connor and Donald Wolbrink as the International Planning Collaborative - Interplan
  • 1968 President, Victorian Chapter, Royal Australian Institute of Architects
  • 1961 Combined with R. H. McIntyre & Associates to form McIntyre, McIntyre & Partners Pty Ltd
  • 1956-61 Formed partnership: Peter and Dione McIntyre & Associates
  • 1950-53 Commenced practice and in 1953 formed partnership: Borland, Murphy & McIntyre
  • 1944-50 Studied architecture, graduating in 1950[5]

Professional service highlights

  • 2006 Convenor, restoration appeal, and Architect, Kew Court House
  • 2004 Chairman, competition jury for RAIA Heritage Award
  • 2001 Chairman, competition jury for Spencer Street Station (now Southern Cross Station[6]
  • 1995 Chairman, competition jury for Museum of Victoria
  • 1994 Appointed Honorary Fellow of the American Institute of Architects
  • 1993 Chairman, Design Review Committee (Crown Casino), Melbourne Casino Authority
  • 1990 President, Trinity Grammar School Council
  • 1986 Chairman, National Trust Maritime Museum
  • 1984 Chairman, Board of Directors, Dinner Plain Pty Ltd
  • 1980 Appointed to Trinity Grammar School Council
  • 1978 Appointed to the Fountains Trust
  • 1977-78 Director of the Architects' Revue, Royal Australian Institute of Architects
  • 1973-74 President, Royal Australian Institute of Architects
  • 1973 Member of the National Building & Construction Council, Australia
  • 1972 Chairman, Sunbury Convention, Royal Australian Institute of Architects
  • 1971 Director of the Architects' Revue, Royal Australian Institute of Architects
  • 1970 Appointed to the Timber Industry Advisory Board; Chairman, awards jury, Royal Australian Institute of Architects; Chairman, Metric Committee, Royal Australian; Institute of Architects;
  • 1968 President, Victorian Chapter, Royal Australian Institute of Architects
  • 1966 Appointed to the Mount Buller Committee of Management (1966–71)
  • 1965 Appointed to the Architects Registration Board of Victoria
  • 1963 Councillor, Royal Victorian Institute of Architects[7]

Competitions

  • 1979 National Archives Competition finalist.
  • 1969 National Gallery (Canberra) Competition finalist.
  • 1958 Stawell Swimming Pool Competition 1958 winner.
  • 1957 Academy of Science (Canberra) Competition 1957 finalist.
  • 1952 Olympic Swimming Pool (Melbourne) Competition 1952 winner.

Academic activities

  • 1994 Appointed Emeritus Professor of Architecture, The University of Melbourne
  • 1990 Delivered the A. S. Hook Memorial Address, The University of Melbourne
  • 1987 Appointed to the Chair of Architecture, The University of Melbourne
  • 1985 Professorial Associate, Department of Architecture, The University of Melbourne
  • 1971 Appointed to Standing Committee for Chair of Architecture, The University of Melbourne
  • 1957 Lecturer in Charge, final year design, Department of Architecture, RMIT
  • 1957-1960 Ateliers, evenings
  • 1953-56 Lectured on design principles of Olympic Swimming Pool to students/graduates/public
  • 1951-53 4th Year tutor, School of Architecture, The University of Melbourne
  • 1950 Appointed as a tutor, School of Architecture, The University of Melbourne
  • 1949-54 Director, Architects' Revue, The University of Melbourne
  • 1948 Founder and Director, Architects' Revue, The University of Melbourne
  • 1944 Inaugural member and joint founder of RMIT Student's Representative Council

McIntrye's titles are: AO, DArch, BArch, DipArch, DipTRP, LFRAIA, FRAPI, FAIA, Emeritus Professor of Architecture - University of Melbourne.[8][9]

Awards

  • Victorian Architecture Awards 2014 Best Enduring Architecture[10]
  • Institute of Architects Commendation Award 2013. Project Richard and Elizabeth Tudor Centre at Trinity Grammar [11]
  • RAIA Gold Medal 1990 awarded to Peter McIntyre [12]
  • RAIA Sir Zelman Cowen Medal 1987 Project: Dinner Plain Alpine Village, Victoria [13]
  • RAIA Merit Award 1985. Project: Parliament Station, Melbourne
  • RAIA Sir Zelman Cowen Medal 1985. Project: Parliament Station, Melbourne
  • RAIA Robin Boyd Medal 1983. Project:Seahouse, Victoria [5]
  • RAIA Merit Award 1980. Project: Kyla Park Housing Development, NSW
  • RAIA Award 1978 Bronze medal. Project: Westfield Knox, Victoria
  • IES Meritorious Lighting Award 1978. Project: Westfield Knox, Victoria
  • RAIA Urban & Community Design Bronze medal. Project: Melbourne Strategy Plan
  • RAIA Architectural Projects Award 1975. Project: The Jam Factory, Melbourne
  • Sir James Barrett Memorial Medal 1974 Project: Melbourne Strategy Plan
  • Building of the Year 1956. Project: Olympic Swimming Pool, Melbourne[14]
  • RAIA Architecture & Arts Award 1954/55. Project: McIntyre House, Melbourne[15]
  • Architecture Arts Award 1954. Project: Snelleman House, Melbourne[16]

Film

  • 1960 Your House and Mine, directed by Peter McIntyre, distributed by State Film Centre.

References

  1. ^ "Retirement not on drawing board". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 19 July 2014. 
  2. ^ "Melbourne Architecture" (PDF). 2005-05-25. p. 2. Retrieved 2009-07-07. 
  3. ^ McIntyre Partnership: Projects
  4. ^ Monash Biographical Dictionary of 20th Century Australia. Reed Reference Publishing. 1994. p. 358. ISBN 1-875589-19-8. 
  5. ^ "Peter McIntyre wins two Victorian Architecture Awards for works completed decades apart". Architecture and Design. Retrieved 19 July 2014. 
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ "Peter McIntyre". McIntyre Partnerships Pty Ltd. Retrieved 19 July 2014. 
  8. ^ CV Peter McIntyre
  9. ^ Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning Honorary Staff, University of Melbourne, accessed 19 July 2014
  10. ^ Peter McIntyre wins two Victorian Architecture Awards for works completed decades apart
  11. ^ [2]
  12. ^ [3]
  13. ^ [4]
  14. ^ Nationally Significant 20th-Century Architecture: Olympic Swimming Stadium (former)
  15. ^ Nationally Significant 20th-Century Architecture: McIntyre House
  16. ^ McIntyre Partnership: Snelleman House

Further reading

  • 1995 Heroic Melbourne: Architecture of The 1950s by Norman Day, RMIT, Melbourne, 1995 ISBN 0-86444-523-7
  • 1990 June: Architecture Australia, Vol.79 No.25 pp. 30–33, Struggle For Meaning by Peter McIntyre.
  • 1990 June: Architecture Australia Vol.79 No.25 pp. 34–53, Optimism and Experiment by Philip Goad.
  • 1990 June: Architecture Australia, Vol.79 No.25 pp. 58–60, Dinner Plain: With Gusto by Jeff Turnbull.
  • 1990 June: Architecture Australia Vol.79 No.25 pp. 61–70, No Plain Sailing by Rob McIntyre
  • 1983 Dinner Plain Village Environmental Effects Statement.
  • 1978 Mount Baw Baw Plan.
  • 1976 Mount Buller Village Plan.
  • 1976 Underground railway stations - research in Europe and USA (for Melbourne Underground Loop Authority).
  • 1976 Jam Factory Environmental Impact Statement (The first such statement ever requested by Melbourne Metropolitan Planning Authority).
  • 1978 Mount Hotham Village Plan.
  • 1973 Melbourne Strategy Plan, pub. Melbourne City Council.
  • 1970 RAIA Metric Conversion Report. (Building Construction Advisory Committee, Metric Conversion Board of Australia)
  • 1969 RAIA Services Company Project.
  • 1969 Comprehensive Architectural Services, RAIA Convention.
  • 1968 Ski Resort Development Post.
  • 1968 Melbourne Architectural Oration Series.
  • 1964 Alpine Building Regulations (for RAIA, incorporated into Uniform Building Regulations of Victoria).
  • 1955 Evaluation of Olympic Swimming Stadium.
  • 1951-1953 "Cross Section", architectural newsletter, The University of Melbourne.

External links

  • McIntyre Partnership
  • By Design ABC: Home of the Month - Peter McIntyre's house
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