Peter Hintze

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Peter Hintze
Peter Hintze 2013.jpg
Vice President of the Bundestag
(on proposal of the CDU/CSU-group)
In office
22 October 2013 – 26 November 2016
President Norbert Lammert
Preceded by none (second VP-post for the CSU/CSU-group was created after the 2013 election)
Succeeded by Michaela Noll
Member of the Bundestag
In office
1990 – 2016
Personal details
Born (1950-04-25)25 April 1950
Honnef, West Germany
(now Germany)
Died 26 November 2016(2016-11-26) (aged 66)
Political party  German:
Christian Democratic Union
 EU:
European People's Party
Alma mater
Profession Parson

Peter Hintze (25 April 1950 – 26 November 2016) was a German politician of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) and from 2013 one of the six Vice Presidents of the Bundestag.[1] He had previously been federal chairman of the Evangelical Working Group of the CDU/CSU from 1990 to 1992 and general secretary of the CDU from 1992 to 1998. He served as a member of the Bundestag from 1990. He was also Vice President of the Centrist Democrat International.

Political career

Hintze served as a member of the German Bundestag from the 1990 federal election. Between 1990 and 1992, he chaired the Evangelical Working Group of the CDU/CSU.

In 1991/1992, Hintze briefly served as Parliamentary State Secretary at the Federal Ministry of Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth under minister Angela Merkel in the fourth cabinet of Chancellor Helmut Kohl.

During the national election campaign in 1994 Hintze was the driving force behind the Rote-Socken-Kampagne ("Red Socks Campaign"), a campaign which was directed against the left-wing PDS and the alleged possibility of a coalition between the PDS and the Social Democratic Party. It is believed that the Rote-Socken-Kampagne contributed to the electoral victory of the CDU and Chancellor Helmut Kohl.

In autumn 2005, the Bundestagswahl 2005 ended the Gerhard Schröder era; Angela Merkel became chancellor of a Union/SPD-cabinet. From 2005 to 2013, Hintze served as Parliamentary State Secretary at the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Technology under ministers Michael Glos (2005–2009); Karl-Theodor zu Guttenberg (2009); Rainer Brüderle (2009-2011); and Philipp Rösler (2011–2013) in the first and second cabinets of Chancellor Angela Merkel. Between 2007 and 2013, he was also the government’s Coordinator of Aerospace Policy.

From 2006, Hintze led the Bundestag group of CDU parliamentarians from North Rhine-Westphalia, the largest delegation within the CDU/CSU parliamentary group.

In the negotiations to form a coalition government of the Christian Democrats (CDU together with the Bavarian CSU) and the Free Democratic Party (FDP) following the 2009 federal elections, Hintze was part of the CDU/CSU delegation in the working group on foreign affairs, defense and development policy, led by Franz Josef Jung (CSU) and Werner Hoyer (FDP). Later, in the negotiations to form a Grand Coalition of Merkel's Christian Democrats and the SPD following the 2013 German elections, he was part of the CDU/CSU delegation in the working group on bank regulation and the Eurozone, led by Herbert Reul and Martin Schulz.

In his capacity as vice-president, he was a member of the parliament’s Council of Elders, which – among other duties – determines daily legislative agenda items and assigning committee chairpersons based on party representation.

Hintze died from cancer on 26 November 2016.[2] He was 66.

Other activities

Recognition

References

  1. ^ Müller, Peter. "Bundestagsvizepräsident: CDU-Politiker Hintze will Sterbehilfe ermöglichen". Der Spiegel (in German). Retrieved 14 September 2014. 
  2. ^ CDU-Politiker Peter Hintze gestorben Bild, November 27, 2016.

External links

  • Peter Hintze, Vice-President of the Bundestag
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Peter_Hintze&oldid=805816459"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Hintze
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Peter Hintze"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA