Paul-Henri Mathieu

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Paul-Henri Mathieu
Paul-Henri Mathieu 3, 2015 Wimbledon Qualifying - Diliff.jpg
Country (sports)  France
Residence Geneva, Switzerland
Born (1982-01-12) 12 January 1982 (age 36)
Strasbourg, France
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Turned pro 1999
Retired 31 October 2017
Plays Right-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money US$6,299,093
Singles
Career record 276-306
Career titles 4
Highest ranking No. 12 (7 April 2008)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 4R (2006, 2008)
French Open 4R (2002, 2008)
Wimbledon 4R (2007, 2010)
US Open 3R (2004, 2010)
Other tournaments
Olympic Games QF (2008)
Doubles
Career record 30–88
Career titles 1
Highest ranking No. 103 (15 September 2008)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 1R (2005, 2009, 2017)
French Open 2R (2002)
Wimbledon 1R (2003, 2007)
US Open 1R (2004, 2007, 2008, 2009)
Team competitions
Davis Cup F (2002)
Last updated on: 13 November 2017.

Paul-Henri Mathieu (born 12 January 1982) is a retired French tennis player. He won four singles titles on the ATP World Tour. His best singles performance in an ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournament was reaching the semifinals of the 2005 Canadian Open. He achieved a career-high ATP singles ranking of world No. 12 in April 2008.

Tennis career

Mathieu was born in Strasbourg, France. He first began playing tennis at age 3, with his older brother Pierre-Yves. Between 1997 and 2000 he trained at the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy in Bradenton, Florida.

Juniors

As a junior, Mathieu posted a singles record of 42–15 (and 34–12 in doubles), reaching as high as No. 6 in the world in January 2000 (and No. 19 in doubles the same month). Mathieu won the boys' singles title at the 2000 French Open, (defeating Tommy Robredo in the final)

2000–2004

Mathieu made his ATP World Tour singles main draw debut in July 2000 in the Austrian town of Kitzbühel.

2002 was Mathieu's breakthrough year. He made the fourth round of the French Open, losing to Andre Agassi in five sets, despite having a two-set lead. Later on in the year, he confirmed his potential by winning back-to-back tournaments in Moscow and Lyon. He holds the distinction of being the last player to beat Pete Sampras before his retirement, which he did at the 2002 TD Waterhouse Cup. On 14 October, he became world no. 36, and his progress won him the ATP Newcomer of the Year award for 2002. He also nearly won the Davis Cup in 2002 with the French Davis Cup team, but lost the deciding rubber of the final to Mikhail Youzhny of Russia, once more after relinquishing a two-set advantage.

2005

In 2005, he achieved his best result in an ATP Masters Series event, knocking out Andy Roddick on his way to the semifinals at Montreal. He had a record of 2–2 in the four Davis Cup matches he played that year. He won both his matches against the Swedish opponents Thomas Johansson and Joachim Johansson, but lost to Russia's Nikolay Davydenko and Igor Andreev in the quarterfinal tie.

2006

2006 saw him equal his best result at a Grand Slam tournament by reaching the fourth round of the Australian Open. In May a career-high ranking of no. 32 was attained. In the third round of the French Open, he lost to eventual champion Rafael Nadal in a gruelling encounter which lasted 4 hours and 53 minutes, but amazingly only saw 42 games played (Nadal won the match 5–7, 6–4, 6–4, 6–4, with the first set lasting 93 minutes and each of the following sets longer than an hour). Many tennis players and commentators, including two-time French Open runner-up Àlex Corretja, hailed it as a classic.

2007

2007 started poorly for Mathieu when he injured himself at the Australian Open during a 1st round encounter against Spaniard Fernando Verdasco and was forced to retire from the match. This was unfortunate as Mathieu was up 2 sets and 3–0 in the 3rd set tiebreak at the time. After returning from his injury, he reached the 4th round in Miami, beating then world number 5 Fernando González of Chile along the way, before bowing out to Andy Murray in 3 sets.

On 29 April 2007, Mathieu won his 3rd career title, the Grand Prix Hassan II in Casablanca defeating Álbert Montañés 6–1, 6–1. At Wimbledon, he reached round 4 for the first time, defeating Radek Štěpánek, No. 17 seed (15th-ranked) David Ferrer, and 15th seed (12th-ranked) Ivan Ljubičić. He attained a career high ranking of 28 in singles after this result, entering the world's top 30 for the first time. The week after Wimbledon, he beat Italian Andreas Seppi 6–7, 6–3, 7–5 in a difficult final to claim his fourth ATP Tour title in Gstaad, Switzerland. He rose to No. 23 in the rankings, making his top 25 breakthrough.

At the Montreal Masters, he produced one of the comebacks of the season to beat 15th seed Guillermo Cañas. Trailing 4–6, 0–4, he managed to up his level of play to win 13 of the next 14 games and record a win by the score of 4–6, 7–5, 6–0. He followed that up with a win over Mario Ančić in round 2. In round 3, he ran into Rafael Nadal, and actually won the first set 6–3 before losing the next two 6–3, 6–2.

He then made the semi-finals of New Haven losing to world number 6 James Blake in a 3rd set tiebreak. This result projected him in the world's top 20 for the 1st time, at the 20th rank.

2012

At the 2012 French Open, Mathieu won his first round match from two sets down before defeating John Isner in five sets, 18–16 in the decider in what proved to be the second longest match in French Open history and fourth longest in Grand Slam history.[1] He lost in the third round to the Spaniard Marcel Granollers.[2] Mathieu defeated Igor Andreev of Russia in the Swiss Open [6–3, 7–6 (4)].[3]

2015

At the 2015 Generali Open Kitzbühel, Mathieu reached the final as a qualifier, after wins over Kenny de Schepper, Martin Kližan, Federico Delbonis and Nicolás Almagro. He lost in the final to Philipp Kohlschreiber 2–6, 6–2, 6–2.

2017

Mathieu played the last singles and doubles match of his career in an ATP World Tour Masters 1000 tournament - the 2017 Rolex Paris Masters. Rank world no. 265 in the ATP singles rankings coming into the tournament, he lost in the second and final singles qualifying round to Vasek Pospisil. He and his partner Benoît Paire lost in the doubles main draw first round to the American pair of Nicholas Monroe and Jack Sock.[4]

Playing style

Mathieu is known for his exceptionally clean groundstrokes on both wings, with his heavy topspin forehand probably being his biggest weapon.

Personal life

A relatively popular, well-liked player despite his inconsistent career results, Mathieu is often affectionately known by his initials, PHM. His favourite surfaces are clay and hard, and he admired Boris Becker while growing up. His brother Pierre-Yves is now a tennis coach in Strasbourg. In March 2012, Mathieu became a father for the first time when his wife, Quiterie Camus, gave birth to the couple's first child, a son named Gabriel. Their second child, a daughter named Inès, was born in March 2017.[4][5]

ATP World Tour career finals

Singles: 10 (4 titles, 6 runners-up)

Legend
Grand Slam Tournaments (0–0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0–0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0–0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0–1)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (4–5)
Finals by Surface
Hard (0–3)
Clay (2–3)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (2–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 6 October 2002 Kremlin Cup, Moscow, Russia Carpet (i) Netherlands Sjeng Schalken 4–6, 6–2, 6–0
Winner 2. 13 October 2002 Open Sud de France, Lyon, France Carpet (i) Brazil Gustavo Kuerten 4–6, 6–3, 6–1
Runner-up 1. 28 September 2003 Campionati Internazionali di Sicilia, Palermo, Italy Clay Chile Nicolás Massú 6–1, 2–6, 6–7(0–7)
Winner 3. 29 April 2007 Grand Prix Hassan II, Casablanca, Morocco Clay Spain Álbert Montañés 6–1, 6–1
Winner 4. 15 July 2007 Swiss Open, Gstaad, Switzerland Clay Italy Andreas Seppi 6–7(1–7), 6–4, 7–5
Runner-up 2. 14 October 2007 Kremlin Cup, Moscow, Russia Hard (i) Russia Nikolay Davydenko 5–7, 6–7(9–11)
Runner-up 3. 5 October 2008 Moselle Open, Metz, France Hard (i) Russia Dmitry Tursunov 6–7(6–8), 6–1, 4–6
Runner-up 4. 26 July 2009 International German Open, Hamburg, Germany Clay Russia Nikolay Davydenko 4–6, 2–6
Runner-up 5. 8 August 2015 Austrian Open Kitzbühel, Kitzbühel, Austria Clay Germany Philipp Kohlschreiber 6–2, 2–6, 2–6
Runner-up 6. 7 February 2016 Open Sud de France, Montpellier, France Hard (i) France Richard Gasquet 5–7, 4–6

Doubles: 2 (1–1)

Legend
Grand Slam Tournaments (0–0)
ATP World Tour Finals (0–0)
ATP World Tour Masters 1000 (0–0)
ATP World Tour 500 Series (0–1)
ATP World Tour 250 Series (1–0)
Finals by Surface
Hard (0–0)
Clay (1–0)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Winner 1. 13 September 2008 Romanian Open, Bucharest, Romania Clay France Nicolas Devilder Poland Mariusz Fyrstenberg
Poland Marcin Matkowski
7–6(7–4), 6–7(9–11), [22–20]
Runner-up 1. 25 July 2010 International German Open, Hamburg, Germany Clay France Jérémy Chardy Spain David Marrero
Spain Marc López
3–6, 6–2, [8–10]

Performance timelines

Key
W  F  SF QF #R RR Q# A P Z# PO G F-S SF-B NMS NH
(W) Won; (F) finalist; (SF) semifinalist; (QF) quarterfinalist; (#R) rounds 4, 3, 2, 1; (RR) round-robin stage; (Q#) qualification round; (A) absent; (Z#) Davis/Fed Cup Zonal Group (with number indication) or (PO) play-off; (G) gold, (F-S) silver or (SF-B) bronze Olympic medal; a (NMS) downgraded Masters Series/1000 tournament; (NH) not held.
To avoid confusion and double counting, these charts are updated either at the conclusion of a tournament, or when the player's participation in the tournament has ended.

Singles

Current till 2017 US Open.

Tournament 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 SR W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A Q1 1R A A 1R 4R 1R 4R 2R A A A 1R Q2 1R 1R 1R 0 / 10 7–10
French Open A Q1 1R 4R 1R A 3R 3R 3R 4R 3R 1R A 3R 1R 1R 1R 2R 1R 0 / 15 17–15
Wimbledon A A A 2R 1R A 1R 1R 4R 3R 2R 4R A 1R 2R 1R Q3 1R Q3 0 / 12 12–12
US Open A Q1 Q1 1R 1R 3R 1R 2R 1R 2R 1R 3R A 2R 1R 2R 1R 2R Q1 0 / 14 9–14
Win–Loss 0–0 0–0 0–1 4–4 0–3 2–1 2–4 6–4 5–4 9–4 4–4 5–3 0–0 3–3 1–4 1–3 0–3 2–4 0–2 0 / 51 44–51
Olympic Games
Summer Olympics NH A Not Held A Not Held QF Not Held A Not Held A NH 0 / 1 3–1
ATP Masters 1000
Indian Wells Masters A A Q1 A A A 4R 3R 3R 3R 3R 2R A A 1R 2R Q1 A A 0 / 8 11–8
Miami Masters A Q1 A Q1 1R A 2R 1R 4R 4R 3R 1R A A A 1R Q1 1R A 0 / 9 7–9
Monte Carlo Masters A Q2 Q2 A 1R A 1R 2R 1R 1R 1R 1R A 2R A 1R Q2 A Q1 0 / 9 2–9
Rome Masters A A A A 1R A 1R 2R A 1R 2R 1R A A A A A Q1 A 0 / 6 2–6
Madrid Masters Not Held A A A 1R A 3R 1R 1R 1R A A Q2 2R A A A 0 / 6 2–6
Canada Masters A A A A 2R A SF 1R 3R 1R 2R 2R A Q2 A A A A A 0 / 7 8–7
Cincinnati Masters A Q1 A A 2R A 2R 1R 1R 1R 3R 2R A 1R A Q2 A Q1 A 0 / 8 5–8
Shanghai Masters Not Masters Series 1R Q1 A A A A A A A 0 / 1 0–1
Paris Masters A Q2 Q1 A 1R 1R 3R 3R 1R 1R 1R A A 2R A A Q2 1R Q2 0 / 9 5–9
Hamburg Masters A A A A 1R A 1R 3R 2R 1R NM1 0 / 5 3–5
Career statistics
Titles / Finals 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 2 / 2 0 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 2 / 3 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 0 0 / 1 0 / 1 0 / 0 4 / 10
Year-end ranking 517 275 150 36 83 123 46 55 25 31 33 97 526 58 129 97 95 73 246 276-306

Doubles

Tournament 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 SR W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A A A A 1R A A A 1R A A A A A A A 1R 0 / 3 0–3
French Open 1R 2R 1R A 1R 1R A A A A A A 1R 1R A 1R 1R 0 / 9 1–9
Wimbledon A A 1R A A A 1R A A A A A A A A 1R A 0 / 3 0–3
US Open A A A 1R A A 1R 1R 1R A A A A A A 1R A 0 / 5 0–5
Win–Loss 0–1 1–1 0–2 0–1 0–2 0–1 0–2 0–1 0–2 0–0 0–0 0–0 0–1 0–1 0–0 0–3 0–2 0 / 20 1–20

Wins against top-10 players

Season 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Total
Wins 0 0 2 1 1 1 0 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 10
# Player Rank Event Surface Rd Score
2002
1. Spain Albert Costa 7 Gstaad, Switzerland Clay 1R 6–4, 6–3
2. Russia Marat Safin 4 Moscow, Russia Carpet (i) SF 7–6(7–3), 6–4
2003
3. Germany Rainer Schüttler 8 Kitzbühel, Austria Clay 2R 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
2004
4. Spain Carlos Moyá 6 Davis Cup, Alicante, Spain Clay RR 6–3, 3–6, 2–6, 6–3, 6–3
2005
5. United States Andy Roddick 5 Montreal, Canada Hard 1R 7–5, 6–3
2007
6. Russia Nikolay Davydenko 3 Sydney, Australia Hard 2R 6–4, ret.
7. Chile Fernando González 5 Miami, United States Hard 3R 6–3, 7–6(8–6)
8. Russia Nikolay Davydenko 4 Davis Cup, Moscow, Russia Clay (i) RR 2–6, 6–2, 6–1, 7–5
9. Chile Fernando González 6 Estoril, Portugal Clay 1R 6–2, 6–4
2008
10. Russia Nikolay Davydenko 5 Summer Olympics, Beijing, China Hard 2R 7–5, 6–3

References

  1. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/tennis/18290547
  2. ^ "Paul-Henri Mathieu". Retrieved 2012-06-04. 
  3. ^ "Eighth-seeded Bernard Tomic loses at Swiss Open". 17 July 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Mathieu Bids Adieu In Paris". ATP World Tour official website. 29 October 2017. 
  5. ^ Tennis Magazine (France) May 2012 issue

External links

Preceded by
Andy Roddick
ATP Newcomer of the Year
2002
Succeeded by
Rafael Nadal
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