Pagoda festival

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Pagoda festivals (Burmese: ဘုရားပွဲ; paya pwe) are regular festivals found throughout Burma (Myanmar) that commemorate major events in pagoda's history, including the founding of a pagoda and the crowning of the pagoda's hti (umbrella).[1] Pagoda festivals are dictated by the Burmese religious calendar and often are held several days at a time. Major events in a pagoda festival typically do not coincide with Uposatha (Buddhist Sabbath) days, during which devout Buddhists observe the Eight Precepts.[1] The majority of pagoda festivals are held during the dry season, from the months of Tazaungmon (November) to Tabaung (March).[2]

More well-known pagoda festivals often attract pilgrims from throughout the country.

Pagoda festivals are similar in nature to agricultural shows (country fairs) or carnivals, and form a significant important part of cultural life, particularly in the countryside. During pagoda festivals, temporary bazaars (including food stalls and merchandise stands), entertainment venues (including anyeint dramas, yoke the performances, lethwei matches,[3] and arcades) are set up in the vicinity of the pagoda.[1]

Major pagoda festivals

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Spiro, Melford E. (1982). Buddhism and Society: A Great Tradition and Its Burmese Vicissitudes. University of California Press. pp. 229–231. ISBN 9780520046726.
  2. ^ May Sandy (24 January 2011). "U Maung Maung Circus returns to Yangon". Myanmar Times. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  3. ^ Aung Sithu Hein (2 March 2009). "Football, boxing top sports for local fans". Myanmar Times. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  4. ^ "Let's enjoy Mann Shwe Sattaw Pagoda Festival". MRTV-3. Archived from the original on 13 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  5. ^ "Yearly Pilgrimage To Mann Shwe Set Taw". MRTV-3. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  6. ^ Nan Tin Htwe (22 August 2011). "Lost and found at Kyaikhtiyo". Myanmar Times. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  7. ^ Aung Shin (20 February 2012). "A worthy destination for pilgrims". Myanmar Times. Archived from the original on 14 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  8. ^ Nandar Chann (May 2004). "Pa-O: The Forgotten People". The Irrawaddy. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  9. ^ "Shwesayan Pagoda Festival". MRTV-3. Archived from the original on 13 October 2013. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  10. ^ Pan Eiswe Star (31 August 2009). "Trustees announce date for Magwe pagoda festival". Myanmar Times. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  11. ^ Aye Sapay Phyu (27 September 2010). "Inle festival gets green light". Myanmar Times. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  12. ^ Cherry Thein (28 February 2011). "Thanlyin's Kyaik Khauk Pagoda set for revamp". Myanmar Times. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  13. ^ Nyein Ei Ei Htwe. "Twante rocks to Shan drum beat". Myanmar Times. Archived from the original on 21 June 2011. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  14. ^ Cherry Thein (21 February 2011). "History lures visitors to Botahtaung Pagoda". Myanmar Times. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  15. ^ "Let's Visit the Grand Mawtinzun Pagoda Festival". MRTV-3. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
  16. ^ Yu Yu Maw (28 March 2011). "Bago to host Tagu festival in mid-April". Myanmar Times. Retrieved 12 October 2013.
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