Ohinemuri (New Zealand electorate)

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Ohinemuri is a former New Zealand parliamentary electorate. It existed from 1896 to 1928, and was represented by five Members of Parliament.

Population centres

In the 1896 electoral redistribution, rapid population growth in the North Island required the transfer of three seats from the South Island to the north. Four electorates that previously existed were re-established, and three electorates were established for the first time, including Ohinemuri.[1] The electorate was first used in the 1896 election.[2] The original area included the settlements of Paeroa, Waihi, and Te Aroha.[3]

In the 1902 electoral redistribution, Waihi was lost to the Bay of Plenty electorate.[4] In the 1907 electoral redistribution, Waihi came back to the Ohinemuri electorate, but Te Aroha was lost to the Tauranga electorate.[5] Ohinemuri was abolished in the 1927 electoral redistribution, and its area went to the Thames and Waikato electorates.

History

Alfred Cadman was the electorate's first representative. He had represented the area in Parliament since the 1881 election. Cadman retired from the Lower House for appointment to the New Zealand Legislative Council at the end of the parliamentary term in 1899.[6]

At the 1899 election, Jackson Palmer defeated Edward Moss for the Ohinemuri electorate.[7] Palmer had previously represented the Waitemata electorate north of Auckland.[8] At the 1902 election, Moss in turn defeated Palmer.[9] Moss was an Independent Liberal who bitterly opposed Premier Richard Seddon.[10] At the 1905 election, Moss was defeated by Hugh Poland of the Liberal Party.[11] Poland became an independent in 1919, and was defeated in the 1925 election by Albert Samuel.[12]

When the electorate was abolished in 1928,[2] Samuel transferred to the Thames electorate.[13]

Members of Parliament

Key

 Liberal    Independent Liberal    Reform  

Election Winner
1896 election Alfred Cadman
1899 election Jackson Palmer
1902 election Edward Moss
1905 election Hugh Poland
1908 election
1911 election
1914 election
1919 election
1922 election
1925 election Albert Samuel
(Electorate abolished 1928; see Thames and Waikato)

Election results

1911 election

General election, 1911: Ohinemuri, first ballot[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Hugh Poland 2,791 45.57
Socialist Pat Hickey 1,674 27.33
Reform Nisbet McRobie 1,547 25.26
Independent Charles Fletcher 48 0.78
Informal votes 64 1.04
Majority 127 2.07
Turnout 6,124 82.61
Registered electors 7,413
General election, 1911: Ohinemuri, second ballot[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Hugh Poland 3,341 60.60 +15.03
Socialist Pat Hickey 2,134 38.70 +11.37
Informal votes 38 0.68 +0.10
Majority 1,207 21.89
Turnout 5,513 71.67 -10.94
Registered electors 7,413

1908 election

General election, 1908: Ohinemuri, first ballot[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Hugh Poland 2,078 38.03
Conservative Frederick Haselden 1,252 22.91
Socialist Robert Frederick Way 725 13.27
Independent J Foster 268 4.90
Independent Labour Tim Armstrong 256 4.68
Turnout 5,463 78.08
Registered electors 6,932
General election, 1908: Ohinemuri, second ballot[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Hugh Poland 2,884 56.68 +18.65
Conservative Frederick Haselden 2,192 43.08 +20.17
Majority 692 13.60
Turnout 5,088 73.39 -4.69
Registered electors 6,932

1899 election

General election, 1899: Ohinemuri[16][nb 1]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Independent Liberal Jackson Palmer 1,765 31.94
Independent Liberal Edward George Britton Moss 1,470 26.60
Conservative William McCullough 795 14.39
Liberal Mervyn James Stewart 762 13.79
Conservative William Deeble 524 9.48
Liberal Leo De Bakker 206 3.73
Independent Labour Edward James Drumm[nb 2] 4 0.07
Majority 295 5.34
Turnout 5,526 70.19
Registered electors 7,873

Table footnotes:

  1. ^ Please note that the party affiliations shown in this table are uncertain as further discussed on the talk page.
  2. ^ Labour candidates at the time were counted as part of the Liberal Party

Notes

  1. ^ McRobie 1989, p. 63.
  2. ^ a b Wilson 1985, p. 269.
  3. ^ McRobie 1989, p. 62.
  4. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 66f.
  5. ^ McRobie 1989, pp. 70f.
  6. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 187.
  7. ^ "The General Election, 1899". Wellington: Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives. 19 June 1900. p. 1. Retrieved 1 November 2012. 
  8. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 225.
  9. ^ Wilson 1985, pp. 221, 225.
  10. ^ Hokitika Guardian. 7 December 1905.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  11. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 227.
  12. ^ Wilson 1985, pp. 227, 232.
  13. ^ Wilson 1985, p. 232.
  14. ^ a b "The General Election, 1911". National Library. 1912. pp. 1–14. Retrieved 1 August 2013. 
  15. ^ a b "The General Election, 1908". National Library. 1909. pp. 1–34. Retrieved 14 April 2012. 
  16. ^ "The General Election, 1899". Wellington: Appendix to the Journals of the House of Representatives. 19 June 1900. p. 1. Retrieved 12 February 2014. 

References

  • McRobie, Alan (1989). Electoral Atlas of New Zealand. Wellington: GP Books. ISBN 0-477-01384-8. 
  • Wilson, James Oakley (1985) [First published in 1913]. New Zealand Parliamentary Record, 1840–1984 (4th ed.). Wellington: V.R. Ward, Govt. Printer. OCLC 154283103. 
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