November 1944

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1944
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The following events occurred in November 1944:

November 1, 1944 (Wednesday)

November 2, 1944 (Thursday)

November 3, 1944 (Friday)

  • The Japanese began the Fu-Go (fire balloon) campaign against the continental United States.[5]
  • Turkey ended blackout restrictions.[3]
  • Japanese destroyer Akikaze was torpedoed and sunk west of Cape Bolinao, Philippines by the American submarine Pintado when she intercepted torpedoes intended for the aircraft carrier Jun'yō.

November 4, 1944 (Saturday)

November 5, 1944 (Sunday)

November 6, 1944 (Monday)

  • The German garrison at Middelburg surrendered to the Allies.[5]
  • The Italian government announced the formation of a private army about six divisions strong, to enter into the war on the Allied side.[8]
  • The provisional government of France struck down all of the country's anti-Semitic laws. Implementation of this measure was difficult when it came to returning Jews to their former occupations and giving them back their homes and confiscated property.[8]
  • In Liverpool, the largest penicillin factory in the world began production.[8]
  • Born: Wild Man Fischer, songwriter, in Los Angeles, California (d. 2011)
  • Died: Walter Guinness, 1st Baron Moyne, 64, Anglo-Irish politician and businessman (assassinated in Cairo by the Jewish terrorist group Lehi)

November 7, 1944 (Tuesday)

November 8, 1944 (Wednesday)

November 9, 1944 (Thursday)

  • German troops on Walcharen Island surrendered to the Allies.[5]
  • Allied troops in Italy crossed the Montone River.[7]
  • German submarine U-537 was torpedoed and sunk in the Java Sea by the American submarine Flounder.

November 10, 1944 (Friday)

November 11, 1944 (Saturday)

November 12, 1944 (Sunday)

November 13, 1944 (Monday)

  • The Bulgarian 1st Army captured Skopje.[15]
  • The Japanese destroyers Akebono, Akishimo, Hatsuharu and Kiso were all bombed and sunk by U.S. Navy aircraft in and around the Cavite Naval Yard in Manila, while destroyer Okinami was sunk 8 nautical miles west of the city.
  • Japanese submarine I-12 was hedgehogged and sunk east of Hawaii by American warships.
  • Civil air service returned to London for the first time since September 1939.[5]

November 14, 1944 (Tuesday)

November 15, 1944 (Wednesday)

November 16, 1944 (Thursday)

November 17, 1944 (Friday)

November 18, 1944 (Saturday)

November 19, 1944 (Sunday)

November 20, 1944 (Monday)

November 21, 1944 (Tuesday)

November 22, 1944 (Wednesday)

  • Operation Clipper ended in Allied victory.
  • Canadian Parliament assembled in a special meeting to debate the conscription crisis. Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King said that it had not become necessary to require drafted troops to serve overseas and that to do so "would occasion the most serious controversy that could arise in Canada. I can think of no course fraught with greater danger to our war effort, to say nothing of the unity and strength of Canada today and for generations to come, than a general election at this late stage of the war on the conscription issue. Until it is apparent conscription for overseas forces is necessary, the government would not be justified in taking the risk of widespread national dissention."[1]
  • The British submarine Stratagem was depth charged and sunk in the Strait of Malacca by the Japanese submarine chaser CH 35.
  • The film Henry V, adapted from the William Shakespeare play of the same name premiered in the United Kingdom. The film starred Laurence Olivier, who also directed.
  • The musical film Meet Me in St. Louis starring Judy Garland and Margaret O'Brien premiered in St. Louis, Missouri.
  • Died: Joseph Caillaux, 81, French politician; Arthur Eddington, 61, English astronomer, physicist and mathematician

November 23, 1944 (Thursday)

November 24, 1944 (Friday)

November 25, 1944 (Saturday)

November 26, 1944 (Sunday)

November 27, 1944 (Monday)

November 28, 1944 (Tuesday)

  • The Allies began to operate the port of Antwerp.[5]
  • The 57th Army of the 3rd Ukrainian Front captured the Hungarian town of Mohács.[26]
  • German submarine U-80 was lost with all hands in a diving accident off Pillau.

November 29, 1944 (Wednesday)

November 30, 1944 (Thursday)

References

  1. ^ a b "Canada Moves to Showdown in Draft Fight". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: Chicago Daily Tribune: p. 1, 14. November 23, 1944. 
  2. ^ "War Diary for Thursday, 2 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "1944". MusicAndHistory. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  4. ^ "War Diary for Friday, 1 September 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i "1944". World War II Database. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  6. ^ "RAF Bomber Command's Last Major Raid on Bochum". World War II Today. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Chen, C. Peter. "Gothic Line Offensive". World War II Database. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  8. ^ a b c "Was war am 6. November 1944". chroniknet. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  9. ^ "USAAF Lightnings vs Soviet Yaks Over Yugoslavia". World War II Today. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  10. ^ Ridder, Willem (2007). Countdown to Freedom. AuthorHouse. p. 470. ISBN 978-1-4343-1229-7. 
  11. ^ Davidson, Edward; Manning, Dale (1999). Chronology of World War Two. London: Cassell & Co. p. 222. ISBN 0-304-35309-4. 
  12. ^ Dando-Collins, Stephen (2015). Operation Chowhound: The Most Risky, Most Glorious US Bomber Mission of WWII. New York: St. Martin's Press. p. 47. ISBN 978-1-137-27963-7. 
  13. ^ a b c Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 612. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  14. ^ Overy, Richard (2010). War in the Pacific. Osprey Publishing. p. 40. ISBN 978-1-84908-394-2. 
  15. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 13 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  16. ^ "War Diary for Tuesday, 14 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  17. ^ "War Diary for Wednesday, 15 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  18. ^ "War Diary for Friday, 17 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  19. ^ Martin, Robert Stanley (July 26, 2015). "Comics by the Date: September 1944 to December 1944". The Hooded Utilitarian. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  20. ^ "War Diary for Sunday, 19 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  21. ^ "1944: Key Dates". United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  22. ^ Roman, Eric (2003). Austria-Hungary & the Successor States: A Reference Guide from the Renaissance to the Present. Facts On File, Inc. p. 613. ISBN 978-0-8160-7469-3. 
  23. ^ "1,000 Canadian Troops Parade to Fight Draft". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: Chicago Daily Tribune: p. 3. November 25, 1944. 
  24. ^ "168 Dead as Woolworths Obliterated in V2 Attack". World War II Today. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  25. ^ "War Diary for Sunday, 26 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  26. ^ "War Diary for Tuesday, 28 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  27. ^ Edwards, Willard (November 30, 1944). "Finds Canada a Nation Divided on Conscription". Chicago Daily Tribune. Chicago: Chicago Daily Tribune: p. 5. 
  28. ^ "War Diary for Thursday, 30 November 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
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