New York Naval Militia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
New York Naval Militia
NY Naval Militia Renew.png
New York Naval Militia Insignia
Active 1891–present
Country  United States of America
Allegiance  State of New York
Type Naval militia
Size 2,900 (approximately)
Part of New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs
Website http://dmna.ny.gov/nynm/
Commanders
Civilian Leadership Governor Andrew Cuomo
Governor of the State of New York
State Military Leadership

Rear Admiral Ten Eyck Powell III
Commander

Captain Timothy Zakriski
Deputy Commander

Captain David H. Hawley
Chief of Staff

The New York Naval Militia is the federally recognized naval militia of New York State and is under the authority of the Governor of New York as Commander-In-Chief of the state's military forces. With the New York Guard, the New York Army National Guard and New York Air National Guard, it is under the control of the New York State Division of Military and Naval Affairs and New York's Adjutant General. As of June 2017, the New York Naval Militia has over 2,900 members, more than 95% of whom are also members of the U.S. Naval Reserve, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, or U.S. Coast Guard Reserve.[1]

History

The New York Naval Militia was organized as a Provisional Naval Battalion in 1889 and was formally mustered into State service as the First Battalion, Naval Reserve Artillery, on 23 June 1891. One year later the New York Naval Militia was called to active duty to protect steam ship passengers during the 1892 cholera quarantine at Fire Island[2]

After the sinking of USS Maine, the New York Naval Militia sent five divisions of its 1st Battalion to fight in the Spanish–American War.[3] New York Naval Militiamen manned two auxiliary cruisers that fought in the Battle of Santiago de Cuba, and also conducted patrols of New York Harbor.[2]

The New York Naval Militia was activated during both World War I and World War II, as well as the Korean War.[2]

In 1996, the New York Naval Militia was called up after the crash of TWA Flight 800 off Long Island.[4]

In 1997, a memorandum of understanding was signed between the New York Naval Militia and the United States Coast Guard which allowed Coast Guard reservists to join the New York Naval Militia. This was formalized by a change in New York law in 1998 which also allowed up to five percent of the New York Naval Militia to be qualified volunteers who were not reservists.[2]

In 2001, the U.S. state of New York created the New York State Military Emergency Boat Service (MEBS) in an attempt to strengthen homeland security efforts, and a fleet of high-speed, all-aluminum patrol boats was built for this unit.[5]

After the September 11 attacks, the New York Naval Militia was called up to aid in recovery efforts.[4]

In recent years, the New York Naval Militia has mobilized in response to Hurricanes Irene (2011) and Sandy (2012), the significant Buffalo snowstorm of December 2014, and the Lake Ontario flooding of 2017.

Mission

The mission of the New York Naval Militia is to provide a trained and equipped naval force to augment New York National Guard forces during Military Support to Civil Authority operations.[6]

Organization

The New York Naval Militia is organized into three regional commands: Southern Command, encompassing Long Island, New York City, Rockland and Westchester Counties; Northern Command, encompassing the Hudson Valley, Catskill and Adirondack Mountains region; and Western Command, encompassing the vast area of the state from Jamestown to the Saint Lawrence River.[7]

Educational benefits

Since January 1, 1997, any active member of the New York Guard or Naval Militia, in good standing, has been eligible to apply to receive tuition assistance, up to the cost of the State University of New York's (SUNY) maximum in-state undergraduate tuition, at any college, university, or community-technical college in the State of New York recognized and approved by the New York State Board of Regents or State University of New York through the Recruitment Incentive and Retention Program (RIRP).[8]

Gallery

References

  1. ^ "New York Naval Militia". The New York Naval Militia. Retrieved 25 December 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d "New York Naval Militia History". The New York Naval Militia. Retrieved 25 December 2013. 
  3. ^ LaBarre, John. "The New York Volunteer Naval Militia". Spanish–American War Centennial Website. Retrieved 25 December 2013. 
  4. ^ a b Tulak, Arthur N.; Kraft, Robert W.; Silbaugh, Don (Winter 2003). "State Defense Forces and Homeland Security" (pdf). Parameters. U.S. Army Strategic Studies Institute. Retrieved 25 December 2013. 
  5. ^ "New York Naval Militia Military Emergency Boat Service". The New York Naval Militia. Retrieved 25 December 2013. 
  6. ^ DMNA Regulation 10-1 "New York Naval Militia Regulations"
  7. ^ "New York Naval Militia Leadership". The New York Naval Militia. Retrieved 25 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "New York Naval Militia Education Benefits". The New York Naval Militia. Retrieved 28 June 2017. 

External links

  • Official site
  • Official history
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=New_York_Naval_Militia&oldid=801895880"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Naval_Militia
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "New York Naval Militia"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA