New Richmond, Wisconsin

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New Richmond, Wisconsin
City
New Richmond, Wisconsin 12.jpg
Motto(s): The City Beautiful
Location of New Richmond in St. Croix County, Wisconsin.
Location of New Richmond in St. Croix County, Wisconsin.
Coordinates: 45°7′11″N 92°32′21″W / 45.11972°N 92.53917°W / 45.11972; -92.53917Coordinates: 45°7′11″N 92°32′21″W / 45.11972°N 92.53917°W / 45.11972; -92.53917
Country United States
State Wisconsin
County St. Croix
Government
 • Type Mayor - Council
 • Mayor Fred Horne
Area[1]
 • Total 9.35 sq mi (24.22 km2)
 • Land 9.18 sq mi (23.78 km2)
 • Water 0.17 sq mi (0.44 km2)
Elevation[2] 981 ft (299 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 8,375
 • Estimate (2016)[4] 8,897
 • Density 912.3/sq mi (352.2/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code(s) 715 & 534
FIPS code 55-57100[5]
GNIS feature ID 1581681[2]
Website www.newrichmondwi.gov

New Richmond is a city in St. Croix County, Wisconsin, United States. Its population was 8,375 as of the 2010 census.

History

New Richmond was founded in 1857. The first permanent settlement was established by Hiram Foster, who had led a group of settlers from Vermont into the area in search of virgin Wisconsin timber for harvesting. Foster built and operated a sawmill on the banks of the Willow River, which gradually drew more settlers from New England into the area. For the first few years the settlement was called Foster's Crossing, and was later renamed after Richmond Day,[6] the land surveyor who plotted the town. Because another town in Wisconsin had already taken the name Richmond, it was decided to call the town New Richmond. In 1871, New Richmond was made a station on the southwestern branch of Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railroad's 'Omaha X' network, initially working northwards from Hudson to New Richmond and providing a direct connection to St. Paul. Construction on the line continued northeast of New Richmond, reaching Spooner in 1879.ref>http://www.kohlin.com/soo/omahahis.htm</ref> In addition to a steady stream of newcomers from New England, New Richmond saw an influx of Irish immigrants throughout the 1870's and early 1880's, later followed by large numbers of Germans, Norwegians and a few Swedes throughout the 1880's and 1890's. In 1885, the Wisconsin Central Railroad built a line into the north side of town westward from Chippewa Falls, from where it later continued towards Stillwater and on to St. Paul.[7]

On the early evening of June 12, 1899, a deadly EF5 tornado tore through St Croix, Polk and Barron counties along a 46-mile path. While most of the storm's path was confined to rural areas, New Richmond suffered a direct hit, as the tornado leveled half the town's residences and the entire business district. In all, the tornado killed 117 people, 111 at New Richmond alone, injured more than 125, left over 1,500 people homeless and caused an estimated $18 Million in damage. Due to state and federal aid and a large amount of donations, most of the homes and all but two of the businesses destroyed in the storm were able to rebuild by the following winter.[8] . Today, the tornado ranks as the deadliest ever recorded in Wisconsin and the ninth deadliest tornado in American History.[9] Most of Main Street (Knowles Avenue) was rebuilt within five months.[10]

Geography

New Richmond is located at 45°07′11″N 92°32′21″W / 45.119856°N 92.539142°W / 45.119856; -92.539142 (45.119856, -92.539142).[11]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 9.35 square miles (24.22 km2), of which, 9.18 square miles (23.78 km2) is land and 0.17 square miles (0.44 km2) is water.[1] A major source of hydrological water is from the Willow River which is dammed near the center of town.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 729
1890 1,408 93.1%
1900 1,631 15.8%
1910 1,988 21.9%
1920 2,248 13.1%
1930 2,112 −6.0%
1940 2,388 13.1%
1950 2,886 20.9%
1960 3,316 14.9%
1970 3,707 11.8%
1980 4,306 16.2%
1990 5,106 18.6%
2000 6,310 23.6%
2010 8,375 32.7%
Est. 2016 8,897 [4] 6.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]

2010 census

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 8,375 people, 3,421 households, and 2,094 families residing in the city. The population density was 912.3 inhabitants per square mile (352.2/km2). There were 3,684 housing units at an average density of 401.3 per square mile (154.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.5% White, 1.3% African American, 0.6% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.3% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.

There were 3,421 households of which 34.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.9% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.4% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.8% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the city was 33.9 years. 26.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 30.3% were from 25 to 44; 23.2% were from 45 to 64; and 12.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.9% male and 51.1% female.

2000 census

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 6,310 people, 2,561 households, and 1,546 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,237.2 people per square mile (477.7/km2). There were 2,657 housing units at an average density of 521.0 per square mile (201.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 98.15% White, 0.22% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.35% Asian, 0.13% from other races, and 0.92% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.78% of the population.

There were 2,561 households out of which 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.3% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.6% were non-families. 31.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city, the population was spread out with 26.3% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 18.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $43,475, and the median income for a family was $52,422. Males had a median income of $37,306 versus $27,153 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,840. About 4.2% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.8% of those under age 18 and 11.3% of those age 65 or over.

Education

The New Richmond School district consists of three elementary schools, Starr, Hillside, and Paperjack; New Richmond Middle School; and New Richmond High School.

Wisconsin Indianhead Technical College New Richmond is a technical college that serves New Richmond and the surrounding area. WITC also has campuses in Rice Lake, Ashland, and Superior, Wisconsin.[13]

Transportation

The New Richmond Regional Airport (KRNH) is a general aviation airport north of New Richmond's central business district that serves the area and the military. The nearest airport with commercial flights is Minneapolis-Saint Paul International Airport.

Notable people

References

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-24. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-11-18. 
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Chicago and North Western Railway Company (1908). A History of the Origin of the Place Names Connected with the Chicago & North Western and Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railways. p. 185. 
  7. ^ http://www.newrichmondwi.gov/vertical/sites/%7BC9218F77-75C0-470E-9C7A-3DB7AF5571A0%7D/uploads/D204F9AE-3AD3-4AA1-B025-05A19F66F524.PDF
  8. ^ Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
  9. ^ "The 25 Deadliest U.S. Tornadoes". National Storm Prediction Center. Retrieved April 21, 2013. 
  10. ^ New Richmond, Wisconsin - The First 150 Years - 1857-2007. A New Richmond News Publication.
  11. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  13. ^ Programs Offered by WITC by Location.

Further reading

  • Reppe, James D., Beverly S. Hooser, and Mary A. Sather. Over on the East Side, New Richmond, Wisconsin. New Richmond, Wis: New Richmond Heritage Center, 2007.
  • Reppe, James D., and Mary A. Sather. Down on the South Side, New Richmond, Wisconsin. New Richmond, Wis: New Richmond Heritage Center, 2008.
  • Reppe, James D., and Mary A. Sather. Moving West: The First Suburb, New Richmond, Wisconsin. New Richmond, Wis: New Richmond Heritage Center, 2005.
  • Reppe, James D., and Mary A. Sather. Up on the Northside, New Richmond, Wisconsin. New Richmond, Wis: New Richmond Heritage Center, 2006.
  • Sather, Mary A. Sesquicentennial Tales: 150 New Richmondites, 1857-2007, New Richmond, Wisconsin. New Richmond, Wis.: New Richmond Heritage Center, 2007.
  • Sather, Mary A. They Built Their City Twice: A History of New Richmond, Wisconsin. New Richmond, Wis: New Richmond Preservation Society, 1998.
  • Sather, Mary A., and James D. Reppe. Historic New Richmond Downtown, 1899-2009, New Richmond, Wisconsin. New Richmond, Wis: New Richmond Heritage Center, 2009.

External links

  • New Richmond Heritage Center
  • City of New Richmond
  • Sanborn fire insurance maps: 1887 1892 1900 1912
  • New Richmond aerial photos
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