Nativity of Jesus in later culture

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The birth of Jesus has been depicted since early Christianity, and continues to be interpreted in modern artistic forms. Some of the artforms that have described His Nativity include drama (including television and films) and music (including opera).

Literature

Drama

Opera and musicals

  • Rutland Boughton, English composer and founder of the original Glastonbury Festival, wrote a very popular Nativity opera in 1915 called Bethlehem. In 1926, in sympathy with the General Strike and the miners' lockout, he restaged it in London, in modern dress, with Jesus born in a miner's cottage and Herod as the top-hatted capitalist, flanked by soldiers and police.[3]
  • Two From Galilee - A musical of Mary and Joseph leading up to the birth of Jesus Christ
  • Amahl and the Night Visitors by Gian Carlo Monetti

Film

Television

Music

Notes

  1. ^ Hunt, J. (March 1975). "Moorat". The Musical Times. 116 (1585): 228. doi:10.2307/959098. 
  2. ^ Quinn, Bernard J. (Spring 1972). "The Politics of Despair versus the Politics of Hope: A Look at Bariona, Sartre's First pièce engagée". The French Review (Special Issue, No. 4, Studies on the French Theater): 95–105. 
  3. ^ Liner notes to Hyperion Records, Russell Boughton, The Immortal Hours


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