National Film Award for Best Film on Other Social Issues

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National Film Award for Best Film on Other Social Issues
National award for contributions to Indian Cinema
Awarded for Best feature film on Social Issues such as Prohibition, Women and Child Welfare, Anti-dowry, Drug Abuse, Welfare of the Handicapped etc. for a year
Sponsored by Directorate of Film Festivals
Reward(s)
  • Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus)
  • 50,000 (US$700)
First awarded 1984
Last awarded 2017
Most recent winner Aalorukkam
Highlights
Total awarded 38
First winner Accident

The National Film Award for Best Film on Other Social Issues is one of the category in the National Film Awards presented annually by the Directorate of Film Festivals, the organization set up by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in India. It is one of several awards presented for feature films and is awarded with Rajat Kamal (Silver Lotus).

The National Film Awards were established in 1954 to "encourage production of the films of a high aesthetic and technical standard and educational and culture value" and also planned to included awards for regional films.[1][2] In 1984, at the 32nd National Film Awards various new categories were instituted for Swarna Kamal and Rajat Kamal. Categories like the Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Best Costume Design along with the Best Film on Other Social Issues were introduced for the Rajat Kamal. This category was introduced to be awarded annually for films produced in the year across the country, in all Indian languages. As of 2016 since its inception, the award has been present thirty-three times to thirty-six films. It has been presented for films in seven languages with the highest being twelve in Hindi, followed by nine in Malayalam, five in Tamil, four in Marathi, three in Bengali, two in Kannada and one in Telugu. It was not presented on two occasion in 1985 (33rd ceremony) and 2011 (59th ceremony).[3][4]

The inaugural award was conferred upon production banner Sanket (Rajat Kamal and 30,000) and director Shankar Nag (Rajat Kamal and 15,000) for their Kannada film Accident for dealing with the bold topic of whistleblowing against political corruption and dealing with bad effects of alcoholism.[5] On five occasion the award was shared by two films: in 1987 by Tamil films Ore Oru Gramathiley and Vedham Pudhithu, in 1993 by Janani (Bengali) and Naaraayam (Malayalam), in 1994 by Wheelchair (Bengali) and Parinayam (Malayalam), in 2000 by Munnudi (Kannada) and Vetri Kodi Kattu (Tamil), and in 2003 by Hindi films Koi... Mil Gaya and Gangaajal. The most recent recipient of the award is the Malayalam drama film Aalorukkam which portrays the struggles of an aging man who is on a constant search for his son, who left him 16 years back.[6]

Winners

The award includes 'Rajat Kamal' (Silver Lotus) and cash prize to the producers and director each. The first award in 1984 had a monetary association of 30,000 to the producers and 15,000 to the directors.[5] In 1995 at the 43rd award ceremony the Marathi film Doghi was honoured and the cash prices were revised to 30,000 each presented to the director duo Sumitra Bhave–Sunil Sukthankar and co-producers National Film Development Corporation of India (NFDC) and Doordarshan.[7] The monetary association was again revised to 1,50,000 to both the producers and directors in 2006 at the 54th ceremony where producer Policherla Venkata Subbiah and director Satish Kasetty's Telugu film Hope was the winner.[8]

Indicates a joint award for that year

Following are the award winners over the years:

List of films, showing the year (award ceremony), language(s), producer(s), director(s) and citation
Year Film(s) Language(s) Producer(s) Director(s) Citation Refs.
1984
(32nd)
Accident Kannada Sanket Shankar Nag
 –
[5]
1985
(33rd)
No Award [3]
1986
(34th)
Doore Doore Oru Koodu Koottam Malayalam M. Mani Sibi Malayil
For focussing on the dire need for integrity in the educational system in remote areas in a heart warming film, charmingly narrated.
[9]
1987
(35th)
Ore Oru Gramathiley Tamil S. Rangarajan Jyothipandian
For tackling the problem of caste differences and discrimination from the opposite ends of the hierarchy in their own way in a convincing manner and for the rigorous statement they make and the solutions they offer.
[10]
Vedham Pudhithu Tamil Janani Arts Creations P. Bharathiraja
For tackling the problem of caste differences and discrimination from the opposite ends of the hierarchy in their own way in a convincing manner and for the rigorous statement they make and the solutions they offer.
1988
(36th)
Main Zinda Hoon Hindi  • NFDC
 • Doordarshan
Sudhir Mishra
For portraying with redeemed finesse the saga of the agony of the middle class working woman.
[11]
1989
(37th)
Unnikuttanu Joli Kitty Malayalam V. R. Gopinath V. R. Gopinath
For its bleak narration of an unemployed youth becoming an unemployable due to callous social attitudes.
[12]
1990
(38th)
Oru Veedu Iru Vasal Tamil Kavithalayaa Productions K. Balachander
For focussing on women's problem and very sensitively showing the path by which women can be emancipated.
[13]
1991
(39th)
Yamanam Malayalam Ajayan Varicolil Bharath Gopi
For advocating the cause of physically handicapped and upholding their right to be on their own, in a world that is more generous with its sympathy than understanding.
[14]
1992
(40th)
Neenga Nalla Irukkanum Tamil G. V. Films Visu
For its effective and purposeful plea for prohibition.
[15]
1993
(41st)
Janani Bengali Sanat Dasgupta Sanat Dasgupta
For its delicate portrayal of an obscurantist practice like witchcraft, prevalent in certain parts of the country.
[16]
Naaraayam Malayalam Raju Pilakat Sasi Shankar
For its subdued depiction of the possibilities of realising communal harmony.
1994
(42nd)
Parinayam Malayalam G. P. Vijayakumar Hariharan
For recreating a real incident in the social history of Kerala, thereby indicating the continued relevance of gender oppression in traditional caste-dominated society.
[17]
Wheelchair Bengali NFDC Tapan Sinha
For a positive rendition of the condition of handicapped people suggesting affirmative action.
1995
(43rd)
Doghi Marathi  • NFDC
 • Doordarshan
 • Sumitra Bhave
 • Sunil Sukthankar
For its depiction of poverty-stricken rural family consisting of two young sisters. The agony of survival in a tradition bound hostile society and their subsequent liberation is beautifully depicted in the film.
[7]
1996
(44th)
Tamanna Hindi Pooja Bhatt Mahesh Bhatt
For depicting the selfless dedication and love of eunuchs for an abandoned child.
[18]
1997
(45th)
Dhanna Hindi Films Division Deepak Roy
The film stands for the rights of a disabled person to be accorded the privileges of a normal human being within a family and in society. It states in a simple yet convincing manner that the disabled should be encouraged to develop their inner talents.
[19]
1998
(46th)
Chinthavishtayaya Shyamala Malayalam C. Karunakaran Sreenivasan
For its strong theme of a woman's struggle against relentless difficulties heaped upon her by her worthless husband. Her ultimate success and emancipation prove to be socially inspiring.
[20]
1999
(47th)
Kairee Hindi Government of India Amol Palekar
For its charming portrayal of the need to give a secure future, through education, to the girl-child in the backwaters of the country.
[21]
2000
(48th)
Vetri Kodi Kattu Tamil D. Pandian Cheran
For discussing issues on migration from one's own land and the social implications that follow, in the heart land of Tamilnadu, highlighting the need to re-establish the holistic culture of society.
[22]
Munnudi Kannada Navachitra P. Sheshadri
For attempting to discuss the misuse of Shariat by opportunistic men and the manipulation of the testaments on "Nikah" and "Talaaq".
2001
(49th)
Chandni Bar Hindi Lata Mohan Iyer Madhur Bhandarkar
For its realistic portrayal of the problems of an uprooted woman who is brought to Mumbai and forced to work in a beer bar. The film is a poignant and sensitive depicition of innocent girls trapped in the vicious cycle of survival in the underworld.
[23]
2002
(50th)
Swaraaj Hindi George Mathew Anwar Jamal
For its strong and competent depiction of women's empowerment in rural India.
[24]
2003
(51st)
Koi... Mil Gaya Hindi Rakesh Roshan Rakesh Roshan
For its compassionate portrayal of a mentally challenged young man who is able to reach out to the wonders of the universe.
[25]
Gangaajal Hindi Prakash Jha Prakash Jha
For its stark delineation of a wide range of wrongs pervading society, and state.
2004
(52nd)
Perumazhakkalam Malayalam Salim Padiyath Kamal
For its deft handling of a complex, sensitive issue in a very sensitive manner. The central characters in the film reflect the traditional virtues of the Indian women, such as self-sacrifice, endurance and forgiveness, to bring two communities together.
[26]
2005
(53rd)
Iqbal Hindi Subhash Ghai Nagesh Kukunoor
For its inspiring and cinematically energetic portrayal of a hearing impaired in his aspiration to become a champion cricketer.
[27]
2006
(54th)
Hope Telugu Policherla Venkata Subbiah Satish Kasetty
For focusing on the need to re-examine the present-day education system that leads many young people to commit suicide.
[8]
2007
(55th)
Antardwand Hindi Sushil Rajpal Sushil Rajpal
For exposing the "marriages for sale" racket and dramatically presenting a browbeaten girl who finds her courage and her voice and rebels against her tyrannical father.
[28]
2008
(56th)
Jogwa Marathi Shripal Morakhia Rajeev Patil
For hard hitting comment on the victims of age old social customs.
[29]
2009
(57th)
Well Done Abba Hindi Reliance Big Pictures Shyam Benegal
For a socio-political satire about a common man's fight for justice against an all pervasive corrupt system.
[30]
2010
(58th)
Champions Marathi Aishwarya Narkar Ramesh More
In a world of deprivation, the thirst for an education surpasses the hunger for food amongst two young brothers fending for each other and their mother.
[31]
2011
(59th)
No Award [4]
2012
(60th)
Spirit Malayalam M. J. Antony Renjith
As the title suggests the movie establishes the ills of alcoholism. The film-maker has scored by roping in a popular star to propagate the evil effects of the ‘spirit’!
[32]
2013
(61st)
Tuhya Dharma Koncha Marathi Indian Magic Eye Motion Pictures Pvt Ltd. Satish Manwar
For a tale of a poor tribal family being torn between prosecution by law enforcing agencies on one hand and issue of loss of their traditional faith and culture through religious conversions on the other.
[33]
2014
(62nd)
Chotoder Chobi Bengali Shree Venkatesh Films Kaushik Ganguly
For its empathetic portrayal of marginalized people and their struggle for a life of dignity.
[34]
2015
(63rd)
Nirnayakam Malayalam Jairaj Films V. K. Prakash
For tackling a relevant and unaddressed issue of curtailing freedom of movement for the common man due to hartals and processions.
[35]
2016
(64th)
Pink Hindi Rashmi Sharma Telefilms Limited Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury
A gender neutral perspective of a social problem, which definitely needs to be addressed.
[36]
2017
(65th)
Aalorukkam Malayalam Jolly Lonappan V. C. Abhilash
 –
[6]

References

  1. ^ "1st National Film Awards". International Film Festival of India. Archived from the original on 2017-05-17. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  2. ^ "1st National Film Awards (PDF)" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  3. ^ a b "33rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  4. ^ a b "59th National Film Awards for the Year 2011 Announced". Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved March 7, 2012.
  5. ^ a b c "32nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 6, 2012.
  6. ^ a b Ancy K Sunny (13 April 2018). "'Rooted' Malayalam cinema holds head high at the National Film Awards". The Week. Retrieved 16 April 2018.
  7. ^ a b "43rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 6, 2012.
  8. ^ a b "54th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 24, 2012.
  9. ^ "34th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  10. ^ "35th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012.
  11. ^ "36th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012.
  12. ^ "37th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 29, 2012.
  13. ^ "38th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012.
  14. ^ "39th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved February 27, 2012.
  15. ^ "40th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 2, 2012.
  16. ^ "41st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 3, 2012.
  17. ^ "42nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 5, 2012.
  18. ^ "44th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 9, 2012.
  19. ^ "45th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 11, 2012.
  20. ^ "46th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 12, 2012.
  21. ^ "47th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 13, 2012.
  22. ^ "48th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 13, 2012.
  23. ^ "49th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  24. ^ "50th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 14, 2012.
  25. ^ "51st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 15, 2012.
  26. ^ "52nd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved January 28, 2012.
  27. ^ "53rd National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 19, 2012.
  28. ^ "55th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 26, 2012.
  29. ^ "56th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 27, 2012.
  30. ^ "57th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 28, 2012.
  31. ^ "58th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Retrieved March 29, 2012.
  32. ^ "60th National Film Awards Announced" (PDF) (Press release). Press Information Bureau (PIB), India. Retrieved 18 March 2013.
  33. ^ "61st National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. 16 April 2014. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 April 2014. Retrieved 16 April 2014.
  34. ^ "62nd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 24 March 2015. Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  35. ^ "63rd National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. 28 March 2016. Retrieved 28 March 2016.
  36. ^ "64th National Film Awards" (PDF) (Press release). Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived from the original (PDF) on 6 June 2017. Retrieved 7 April 2017.

External links

  • Official Page for Directorate of Film Festivals, India
  • National Film Awards Archives
  • National Film Awards at IMDB
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