Music of Saudi Arabia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The music of Saudi Arabia includes both Western and traditional music. The most distinguished musician in recent Saudi history is Tariq Abdulhakeem, who composed hundreds of famous Saudi songs for himself as well as for other singers. Saraj Omar has become a very prominent composer after composing the music for the Saudi national anthem. In 1999, the 1st Arab Pioneers Festival, which was held in Cairo under the patronage of the Arab League, honored four of the lead composers in Saudi Arabia: Tariq Abdulhakeem, Ghazi Ali, Mohamed Abdu, Saudi Arabia's first pop star, and the late Talal Maddah, known as the "Sound of the Earth", who died in August 2000 while singing in the summer festival on the stage of Al-Muftaha Theatre in the southern region of Saudi Arabia. Of the same generation are the 'ud virtuoso Abadi al Johar, Rabeh Saqer and Abdul-Majeed Abdullah.

Saudi traditional music is quite limited, however. The migratory lifestyle of the bedouin mitigated against carrying excess baggage, including musical instruments. Simple rhythms, with the beat counted by clapping or striking together everyday implements formed the basis of the music. Instruments like the double-reeded ney or the stringed rababa were sometimes used, after being obtained in cosmopolitan cities such as Jeddah.

Music, however, is considered "sinful" or "haram" by some Muslims, including Salah Al Budair who is the Imam of the Grand mosque in Medina. This is based, in part, on certain ahadith which speak negatively of non-percussion musical instruments and the idea that music and art are distractions from God. Some Muslims also believe it is sinful for songs to make any mention of women and for women to be involved in the composition of music.[1] Particularly in the early days of the current Saudi state, religious authorities were quick to repress music other than the rhythmic percussion that still dominates contemporary Saudi music.



Samri is a popular traditional music and dance in Najd Region.

Omar Basaad was chosen as the best Saudi DJ and Electronic Dance Music Producer in 2012, by Saudi Gazette.[2] He became the first official Saudi EDM (Electronic Dance Music) producer to represent Saudi Arabia internationally.[3][4][5]

Rock and metal artists from Saudi Arabia:

  • The AccoLade
  • Al-Namrood
  • Breeze of the Dying
  • Creative Waste
  • Crescent Light
  • Cribcaged
  • Deathless Anguish
  • Disturb the Balance
  • Final Serenade
  • Flesh Laceration
  • Forgotten
  • Grieving Age
  • Hed2Ground
  • Immortal Pain
  • Inversion
  • Mephisophilus
  • Myth
  • Octum
  • Outlive
  • PhiViper
  • Premonition
  • Rivers Running Red
  • Sandstoned (disbanded)
  • Sound of Ruby
  • The Empty Quarter
  • Wry Wreathe
  • Wasted Land

References

  1. ^ Salah Al Budair (23 March 2007). "Obsession with music". Gulf Times. Archived from the original on 26 July 2015. 
  2. ^ Nihal, Mariam (21 January 2013): "Applauding the best of Saudi entertainment", Saudi Gazette.
  3. ^ Saeed, Saeed (16 August 2012): "Music and more at the next Sandance festival in Dubai", The National.
  4. ^ Nihal, Mariam (21 January 2013): "Applauding the best of Saudi entertainment", Saudi Gazette.
  5. ^ (10 September 2012): "Saudi EDM producer to perform in Dubai’s Sandance festivalt", Arab News.
  • The most comprehensive study on music of Saudi Arabia is: Lisa Urkevich, Music and Traditions of the Arabian Peninsula: Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Bahrain, and Qatar. New York: Routledge, 2015.
  • Badley, Bill. "Sounds of the Arabian Peninsula". 2000. In Broughton, Simon and Ellingham, Mark with McConnachie, James and Duane, Orla (Ed.), World Music, Vol. 1: Africa, Europe and the Middle East, pp 351–354. Rough Guides Ltd, Penguin Books. ISBN 1-85828-636-0

External links

Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Music_of_Saudi_Arabia&oldid=787345159"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_of_Saudi_Arabia
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "Music of Saudi Arabia"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA