Montgomery County Police Department

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Montgomery County Department of Police
Patch of the Montgomery County Police Department.png
Patch of the Montgomery County Police Department[1]
Seal of the Montgomery County Police Department.png
Seal of the Montgomery County Police Department
Badge of the Montgomery County Police Department.png
Badge of the Montgomery County Police Department
Flag of Montgomery County, Maryland.svg
Common name Montgomery County Police Department
Abbreviation MCPD[a]
Motto "We begin with pride, and end with excellence!"[3][4]
Agency overview
Formed July 1, 1922; 96 years ago (1922-07-01)[b]
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdiction Montgomery, Maryland, United States of America
Legal jurisdiction Montgomery County, Maryland
General nature • Local civilian agency
Headquarters Montgomery County Public Safety Headquarters, 100 Edison Park Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 20878
39°06′47″N 77°14′11″W / 39.113030°N 77.236462°W / 39.113030; -77.236462Coordinates: 39°06′47″N 77°14′11″W / 39.113030°N 77.236462°W / 39.113030; -77.236462

Sworn members 1,159 (as of January 2012)[9][10][11]
Agency executive
Facilities
Cruisers Dodge Charger, Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor, and Ford Police Interceptor Sedan
Armored cars Lenco BearCat
Mobile command centers Prevost Motor Coach
Website
Montgomery County Police Department

The Montgomery County Police Department (MCPD), officially the Montgomery County Department of Police (MCP), is a nationally accredited agency and the primary law enforcement agency of Montgomery County, Maryland, providing the full spectrum of policing services to the entire county.

Established in July 1922, the MCPD is headquartered in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and in addition to its primary duties, it also provides aid and assistance to other police departments including the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia, and in neighboring jurisdictions such as the District of Columbia, Howard County, Baltimore City, and Prince George's County as requested by authority.[6][7][12]

History

The MCPD's first chief with several policemen on the MCPD's first day of operations in July 1922.
MCPD policemen at Rockville in 1927.
An MCPD policeman in 1929 on a motorcycle.
An MCPD policeman in 1929 on a motorcycle.
MCPD policemen at Silver Spring in 1952.[13]
An MCPD car at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds in 1968.
An MCPD corporal with an elephant at a carnival in 1971.
Firemen and an MCPD policeman rescue a person during flooding in 1975.
An MCPD sergeant with Rockville City P.D. officers in 1976.
MCPD cruiser buried under snow in February 1979
MCPD officers directing traffic in 1981 while dressed as clowns.
MCPD decal displayed on the doors of MCPD police cars from the mid-1980s to the early 2000s.
Two MCPD officers provide security at the annual "Battle for the Kings Trophy" football game in September 2008. They are wearing the current black uniform, which was introduced in 2008.

1922–1955: Founding and early years

The MCPD was established in early July 1922, absorbing some responsibilities from the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office (MCSO) through Chapter 259 of the Acts of 1922. At the time, the department was designated to consist of three to six officers that were appointed to two-year terms by the Montgomery County Board of Commissioners, with one officer designated as the chief.

The first chief of the MCPD was Charles T. "Chas" Cooley, who was from Frederick County, Maryland and served as a soldier in the Spanish–American War.[14]

In July 1924, William L. Aud became the MCPD's chief. He was the Sheriff of Montgomery County from 1917 to 1919.[15]

In 1927, the department was enlarged to twenty officers by Chapter 299 of the Acts of 1927.

From 1922 until 1935, the Montgomery County Board of Commissioners designated one police officer from within the MCPD's ranks to serve as its chief. In 1935, through Chapter 9 of the Acts of 1935, the regulations were changed so that the chief could be appointed from any source, at the discretion of the Montgomery County Board of Commissioners. In 1948, when Montgomery County transitioned to a charter government, the responsibilities of appointing chiefs for the MCPD was transferred to the Montgomery County Executive.[6][7]

In 1927, the MCPD had 20 policemen.[5] In 1931, the MCPD had 27 policemen,[16] and by 1939, the MCPD had 35 policemen.[16]

From 1927 to 1954, the MCPD was headquartered at the lower level of the Montgomery County Courthouse.[5]

In February 1939, Charles M. Orme became the MCPD's chief. He fought as a soldier in World War I and previous served in the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office as a deputy from 1925 to 1939. Under his tenure the MCPD grew from 35 policemen to 177 policemen.[16]

1955–1976: Expansion

By 1955, the MCPD had grown to have 177 policemen.[16]

In April 1955, James Stephen McAuliffe, Sr. became the MCPD's chief. He was the 11th policeman ever hired by the MCPD.[17][18]

Over the course of several decades, the MCPD would eventually grow to over a thousand officers.[6][7]

In 1971, Kenneth Winstead Watkins became the MCPD's chief.[19][20] He was the last policeman to serve as the MCPD's head when it was still known as "superintendent".[19][20] After his retirement, the title of the MCPD's head policeman was changed to "chief".[19][20]

On March 29, 1971, Carol A. Mehrling joined the MCPD as its first female police officer. She would eventually become its first female police chief in 1995, more than two decades later.[21][22]

1976–1979: DiGrazia and departmental politics

In 1976, the title of the head of the MCPD was changed from superintendent to chief.[20] Also that same year, Robert J. DiGrazia, a former Bostonian policeman, became the MCPD's chief, intending to brings new changes to the department.[23] However, he became unpopular with many officers in the department as they believed he was too sharply critical and demanding of them.[24] As a result, he was removed from his position by the county executive in December 1978.[25][26] Donald E. Brooks became the MCPD's acting chief after DiGrazia was dismissed.[19]

1979–1991: Crooke and modernization

In 1979, a computerized fingerprinting system was installed for use by the MCPD.[20]

In April 1979, Bernard Crooke, a former MPDC officer,[27] became the MCPD's chief. He would serve in that capacity before dying in office in February 1988.[27] After Crooke died, Donald E. Brooks became the MCPD's acting chief.[19]

By the 1980s, the MCPD had 750 officers,[27] and by September 1991 it had 849 officers.[28]

In March 1981, MCPD policeman Philip Carl Metz was shot and killed while confronting a gang of armed robbers at a Silver Spring business.[29] A security guard was also killed by the robbers. Metz is the most recent MCPD policeman to have been deliberately murdered in the line of duty by gunfire.[30]

1991–1999: Mehrling and the NAACP

On September 24, 1991, Clarence Edwards became the chief of the MCPD, becoming the department's first African American chief as well as the first African American chief of a Maryland county-level police department. He was a former U.S. Park Police (USPP) officer for 21 years and had joined the USPP in September 1963. He also served in the Maryland-National Capital Park Police.[22]

However, in December 1994, Edwards was relieved of his position by Montgomery County Executive Douglas Duncan, who had taken office that same month, a move which angered the local chapter of the NAACP. Edwards was succeeded by interim MCPD chief Carol A. Mehrling, who joined the MCPD on March 29, 1971. On February 2, 1995, Mehrling was chosen by Duncan to be the MCPD's fourteenth chief, becoming the department's first female chief. The MCPD was, at the time, the second-largest police department in the United States to be headed by a woman.[21][22]

On February 17, 1997, the local Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) body voted overwhelmingly in passing a resolution of no confidence in Mehrling's abilities as chief, claiming that she was not doing enough to defend MCPD officers against accusations of misconduct and abuse by the NAACP. As a result of these allegations, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) launched an investigation into the operations of the MCPD. On November 17, 1998, Mehrling announced that she would retire from the MCPD and did so on February 3, 1999, with Thomas Evans becoming the acting chief.[31][32]

Throughout much of the 1990s, the MCPD faced numerous allegations of abuse, excessive force, and misconduct, including fatal officer-involved shootings in Wheaton and Silver Spring in April 1999 and March 1999, respectively. These accusations resulted in the U.S. Justice Department investigating the department for three years.[33][6][34][35][36][37][31][32][38][39][40]

1999–2003: Moose and the D.C. sniper attacks

On August 2, 1999, Charles A. Moose became the fifteenth MCPD chief, during a time when the MCPD was nearing the end of a three-year-long U.S. Department of Justice investigation into allegations of misconduct and abuse committed by its officers.[33] Moose was a U.S. Air Force commissioned officer[41] and was the former chief of the Portland Bureau of Police.

By the end of 1999, crime in Montgomery County was lower than at the start of the decade, with total violent crime down 16 percent, rapes down 23 percent, robberies down 8 percent, aggravated assaults down 19 percent, and overall crime down 9 percent.[42]

On January 14, 2000, a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed between the U.S. Department of Justice and the MCPD regarding abuses and misconduct committed by the latter. The agreement detailed how the MCPD was to address and correct the misconduct and abuses committed by its officers.[43]

On March 12, 2002, John A. King, on Moose's recommendation, was unanimously approved as the MCPD's assistant chief by the county council, after Alan G. Rodbell retired on December 23, 2001 to fill a law enforcement job position in Arizonan city of Scottsdale.[44]

In October 2002, several of the D.C. sniper attacks occurred in Montgomery County. Moose and the MCPD played a major role in the ensuing investigation. In June 2003, Moose resigned amid controversy over a book he helped author alongside Charles Fleming, that detailed Moose's experiences during the D.C. sniper attacks. The county government objected in stating that the MCPD chief was not allowed to profit privately from official duties; the book itself was released on September 15, 2003.[45][46]

2003–2004: O'Toole and the search for a new chief

After resigning as the MCPD's chief in June 2003, Moose was succeeded by William C. "Bill" O'Toole, who served as the MCPD's acting chief until a new chief could be found.[47][48][49][50] O'Toole was the MCPD's assistant chief previously; he himself retired from the MCPD on August 1, 2006.[47][48][49]

2004–present: Manger, downsizing, and a new headquarters

On January 30, 2004, J. Thomas Manger, a former officer of the Fairfax County Police Department (FCPD), became the sixteenth MCPD chief.[51][52][53][54] Manger is a graduate of the FBI National Academy[48][51][52][53][54] and served as the FCPD's acting chief before becoming its chief.

On October 5, 2007, ten MCPD officers were charged in a "double-dipping" probe. The accused officers were alleged to have improperly billed Grady Management, a Silver Spring real estate firm, for more than 8,900 hours for which they also were compensated by the police. The accused improperly earned more than $200,000.[55]

From its founding until 2008, the MCPD wore khaki-colored uniforms.[13] However, in 2008, the MCPD switched to its current black-colored uniforms. These uniforms are usually worn with a ballistic vest on top of the uniform's shirt, with the word "POLICE" embroidered onto the back. However, formal uniforms for ceremonial occasions are still khaki and olive-colored.

In 2010, the MCPD shot and killed a hostage-taker at the Discovery Communications building in Silver Spring after he attempted to chase after his hostages when they attempted to flee.[56]

The MCPD's total number of personnel declined from 2010 to 2012.[11] In 2010, the MCPD had 1,629 policemen, but by January 2012 it only had 1,159.[9][10][11]

Until 2012, the MCPD was headquartered at 2350 Research Boulevard in the county seat of Rockville. In 2012, the MCPD moved its headquarters from Rockville, where it had been headquartered for forty years, to the Montgomery County Public Safety Headquarters, located at 100 Edison Park Drive in Gaithersburg, Maryland, located around four miles from the former MCPD headquarters. The process of transferring the MCPD's headquarters to its new location took around two years at a cost of 108.5 million dollars. The MCPD shares the building with other county agencies, such as the Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service (MCFRS) and Montgomery County Office of Homeland Security. The MCPD's 1st District station was also consolidated into this new headquarters. The building which houses the headquarters, located near Lake Placid, was built in the 1960s and was originally used by the National Geographic Society, and later by General Electric (GE). The building was leased to the county government before a purchase date of 2014 was finalized.[57][58][59]

On the evening of January 30, 2014, an MCPD officer shot and killed his son at their home in Gaithersburg as the latter was stabbing the officer's wife, who later died.[60][61]

In December 2015, an MCPD policeman was struck and killed by an automobile being driven by an inebriated person.

2014: Interstate 270 closure

On the morning of March 11, 2014, personnel from the MCPD, Maryland State Police, Rockville City Police, and Prince George's County Police Department, acting on a report, set up a roadblock on across all twelve lanes of Interstate 270 (I-270) and walked car to car with weapons drawn. The incident brought hundreds of vehicles and thousands of motorists on the interstate to a standstill as dozens of police officers conducted vehicle-to-vehicle searches at gunpoint for bank robbers.[62][63]

Controversy

A controversy over the tactics used by the MCPD ensued, with reports of officers walking down I-270 between stopped cars with weapons drawn, telling people to get back in their vehicles, and demanding commuters pop their trunks without any explanation why. One woman was reportedly shouted at by police with weapons drawn after she'd opened her car door to throw up, having gotten motion sickness from sitting in her vehicle for an extended period of time. Chief Thomas Manger defended the MCPD's actions, stating that they were justified under exigent circumstances.[64] Don Troop, a man who witnessed the incident, told the Washington Post that a group of officers made its way to his car and other cars around him. "They were just walking along saying: 'Pop the trunk! Pop the trunk!'" Troop said he overheard a man in a truck next to him call out to another motorist: "The police are looking for bank robbers." A short time later, about nine officers approached his car — including state troopers, county police officers, and at least one plainclothes officer. Among the commands given to motorists by officers were: "stay in your car", "pop the trunk", "get your hands on the steering wheel", and "get you hands up where we can see them", according to Troop. Corporal Aaron Smith, a pilot flying a Prince George's County police helicopter dispatched to assist stated that he "saw that they were searching traffic and going vehicle to vehicle."[65] MCPD spokesman Captain Paul Starks described the incident as a "systematic check of trunks and rear hitches" of detained vehicles.[66]

2014: School bomb threats

In April 2014 and May 2014, the MCPD responded to several bomb threats called against public high schools in the county by a Canadian teenager from Ottawa, Canada.[67] In all three cases, the threats were determined to be baseless after the schools in question were evacuated and searched for any explosives, in which none were found.[68][69][70][71][72][73][74][75][76][77]

Organization

The MCPD is divided into four bureaus and the Office of the Chief.[78]

Headquarters

The MCPD is headquartered at the Public Safety Headquarters at 100 Edison Park Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland, near Lake Placid. It was formerly headquartered at 2350 Research Boulevard in the county seat of Rockville.

Office of the Chief

The Office of the Chief is responsible for the day-to-day activities of the MCPD. This section also contains Community Services, Internal Affairs, Legal and Labor, Media Services, and Stress Management.

The current chief of police is J. Thomas Manger, who has held the office since January 30, 2004.[48] He is the MCPD's 16th chief.[79][48]

Until 1976, the MCPD's head policeman was known as its "superintendent", after which it was changed to its present title of "chief".[20]

Field Services Bureau

The Field Services Bureau contains the general policing districts and the Special Operations Division.

Special Operations Division

The Special Operations Division (SOD), consists of the K-9 Unit, Emergency Services Unit, Police Community Action Team, Special Events Response Team, and Tactical Unit.

Investigative Services Bureau

The Investigative Services Bureau is responsible for providing specialized police services such as (but not limited to) the following: Criminal Investigations Division (CID), Auto Theft, Fraud, Family Crimes, Major Crimes, and Special Investigations Division.

Management Services Bureau

The Management Services Bureau is a largely non-sworn, civilian support bureau. It contains Animal Control, Emergency Communications, Budget, Personnel, Training, and other support services.

Districts

Fleet

The Montgomery County Police Department utilizes a fleet of second-generation Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptors, Dodge Chargers, Chevrolet Impalas, Chevrolet Caprices, Dodge Magnums, Harley-Davidson Police Edition motorcycles, and others. The vehicles use LED lightbars with blue "steady-burn" diodes. In the past, the MCPD used third-generation Dodge Caravans.

The MCPD also uses Lenco BearCats for emergency situations that require an armored vehicle.

Current vehicles

Vehicle Type Country
MCPD Dodge Charger cruiser, June 2009.jpg
First-generation Dodge Charger Cruiser  United States (origin)
Canada (manufacture)
MCPD Dodge Chargers, 6 February 2018.jpg
Second-generation Dodge Charger Cruiser  United States (origin)
 Canada (manufacture)
MCPD Ford Taurus Police Interceptor, 6 February 2018.jpg
Ford Police Interceptor Sedan Cruiser  United States
MCPD Lenco BearCat.jpg
Lenco BearCat Armored car  United States
MCPD Ford CVPI, NWHS, Germantown, Maryland, May 5, 2014.jpg
Ford Crown Victoria Police Interceptor[80] Cruiser  United States (origin)
Canada (manufacture)
Prevost Motor Coach[81][82] Mobile command center  Canada

Past vehicles

Vehicle Type Country
Third-generation Dodge Caravan Minivan  United States

List of chiefs and superintendents

No. Chief Rank Life Tenure
1
Chief Charles T. 'Chas' Cooley, Montgomery County Police Department.jpg
Charles T. "Chas" Cooley[14][19] Chief[14][19] 1869 – July 7, 1930 (aged 61)[14] July 4, 1922 – July 1924[14][19]
2 William L. Aud[19] Chief[19] July 1924 – July 1926[19]
3 Chief Alvie A. Moxley, Montgomery County Police Department.png Alvie Arville Moxley[19][83] Chief[19] June 16, 1876 – June 14, 1963(1963-06-14) (aged 86)[83] July 1926 – January 1935[19]
4 William A. Garrett[19] Chief[19] July 1935 – February 1939[19]
5 Chief Charles M. Orne, Montgomery County Police Department.jpg Charles M. Orme[16][19] Chief[16][19] March 7, 1892 – July 14, 1970(1970-07-14) (aged 78)[16] February 1939 – June 1940[16][19]
6 Andrew M. Newman[19] Chief[19] August 1940 – February 1943[19]
7 Leslie H. Carlin[19] Chief[19] February 1943 – December 1946[19]
8 Chief Charles M. Orne, Montgomery County Police Department.jpg Charles M. Orme[16][19] Chief[16][19] March 7, 1892 – July 14, 1970(1970-07-14) (aged 78)[16] December 1946 – March 1955[16][19]
9 James Stephen McAuliffe, MCPD.jpg James Stephen McAuliffe, Sr.[17][18][19] Colonel[17][18][19] January 16, 1907 – October 31, 1996(1996-10-31) (aged 89)[17][18] April 1955 – April 1971[17][18][19]
10 Kenneth Winstead Watkins[19] Colonel[19] October 21, 1923 – April 14, 2001(2001-04-14) (aged 77) 1971–1976[19]
11 Robert J. DiGrazia, Boston.png Robert J. DiGrazia[20][19] Chief[20][19] February 24, 1928 – present[84] November 1976 – December 1978[20][19]
Donald E. Brooks[19] December 1978 – April 1979[19]
12 Bernard D. Crooke, Jr.[27][85][19] Chief[19] 1933 – February 23, 1988 (aged 54) April 1979 – February 23, 1988[19]
Donald E. Brooks[19] February 23, 1988 – September 1991[19]
13 Clarence Edwards[22][19] Colonel[22][19] (1940-02-14)February 14, 1940 – present[22] September 24, 1991 – December 1994[22][19]
14 Carol Ann Mehrling[6][21][31][19] Chief[6][21][31][19] 1949 – June 14, 2015 (aged 67)[6][21][31] 1995 – February 3, 1999[6][21][31][19]
Thomas Evans[31][32][19] Chief (acting)[31][32][19] February 1999 – August 2, 1999[31][32][19]
15
Charles Alexander Moose
Charles Alexander Moose[19] Chief[19] 1953–present August 2, 1999 – June 2003[19]
William C. "Bill" O'Toole[47][48][49] Chief (acting)[47][48][49] June 2003 – January 30, 2004[47][48][49]
16[48] J. Thomas Manger[51][52][53][54] Chief[48][51][52][53][54] January 30, 2004 – present[48][51][52][53][54]

Ranks

Rank Insignia Notes
Chief of police
Colonel Gold-vector.svg
The rank insignia for the MCPD's chief is a gold-colored U.S. eagle, similar to the silver ones worn by colonels in the U.S. military.[86]
Assistant Chief of Police
Assistant Chief of Police, MCPD
The rank insignia for an MCPD Assistant Chief of Police is a gold leaf, similar to the major rank in the U.S. armed forces.
Commander
Captain
Captain insignia gold.svg
The rank insignia for an MCPD captain are two gold bars, similar to the two silver bars worn by captains in the U.S. Army. They are usually worn embroidered on soft epaulets.
Lieutenant
US-O1 insignia.svg
The rank insignia for an MCPD lieutenant is a single gold-colored bar, similar to that worn by second lieutenants and ensigns in the U.S. military.[87]
Sergeant
Sergeant (yellow pin).png
The rank insignia for an MCPD sergeant are three gold-colored chevrons. They are metallic pins and are worn on the shirt collar of uniforms.[88]
Corporal
Cplpin.png
The rank insignia for an MCPD corporal are two gold-colored chevrons. They are embroidered onto black cloth rectangles and worn as epaulettes, as well as metallic pins and worn on the shirt collars of uniforms.[89]
Police Officer III
Police Officer II
Police Officer I

Historical ranks

Rank Insignia Notes
Chief of police (2002)
2 Gold Stars.svg
During the tenure of Chief Charles A. Moose in the early 2000s, the MCPD chief's rank insignia consisted of two five-pointed yellow stars, similar to the silver ones worn by major generals in the U.S. military.

Awards and decorations

Award Ribbon Criterion
Medal of Valor
Montgomery County Police Department Medal of Valor ribbon.svg
The MCPD's highest award, the Medal of Valor is awarded to an MCPD officer for heroism and distinction in extremely hazardous circumstances. In order to be considered for this honor, an employee must exhibit unusual bravery in the performance of duty while facing the threat of death of serious injury.[90]
Life Saving Award
Montgomery County Police Department Life Saving Award.svg
The Life Saving Award is given to an MCPD officer who makes a major contribution toward saving the life of another by providing essential medical treatment prior to arrival of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel.[91]
Commendation
Montgomery County Police Department Commendation.svg
A Commendation is awarded to an MCPD officer who makes a significant contribution to the mission of the department beyond the ordinary call of duty. It recognizes those incidents wherein the member’s courage, resourcefulness, tenacity, and/or perseverance in the performance of the employee’s duties has resulted in the protection of life or property, the prevention of a major crime, or the apprehension of an armed and dangerous criminal.[92]

Patches

Patch Dates of usage Notes
Patch of the Montgomery County Police Department (1939-1955).png
1930s–1955
Patch of the Montgomery County Police Department (1955-1972).png
1955–1972
Patch of the Montgomery County Police Department (1972-1981).png
1972–1981 Patch used by the MCPD during much of the 1970s and the early 1980s. It was the last patch to feature the old Montgomery County coat of arms before it was redesigned in 1978.
Patch of the Montgomery County Police Department.png
1981–present In 1978, the Montgomery County coat of arms were redesigned by the British College of Arms, and thus, a new patch incorporating the new design was adopted shortly thereafter. The patch is five inches in height.

In popular culture

  • The Montgomery County Police Department is featured in a chapter of the 1996 novel, Unintended Consequences.
  • The Montgomery County Police Department is briefly featured in the 2001 episode of The X-Files television show, "Essence".[93][94]
  • The Montgomery County Police Department is featured prominently in the 2003 television film D.C. Sniper: 23 Days of Fear, where they are shown investigating a string of murders committed by a sniper in the county.
  • The Montgomery County Police Department is featured in the 2005 comedy film The Pacifier.[95]
  • The Montgomery County Police Department is featured in the 2010 comedy film Red.[96]
  • The Montgomery County Police Department is featured in the third-season episode "Gerontion" of the television show Homeland,[97] where they investigate a murder at a house in Bethesda.[98]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ MCP is used in official contexts. MCDP was used in the past, but is now archaic.[2]
  2. ^ Established July 1, 1922, went into operation on July 4, 1922.[5][6][7][8]

References

  1. ^ Montgomery County Department of Police (2015). "The Meaning of our Patch". Maryland: Montgomery County Department of Police. Archived from the original on July 31, 2017. Retrieved July 31, 2017. 
  2. ^ "McLaughlin v. Bradlee, 599 F. Supp. 839 (D.D.C. 1984)". U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia - 599 F. Supp. 839 (D.D.C. 1984). Washington, D.C.: District of Columbia. December 21, 1984. Archived from the original on September 10, 2015. Retrieved September 10, 2015. 
  3. ^ Montgomery County Department of Police (2013). "Organizational Values". myMCPnews. Montgomery County Department of Police. Archived from the original on August 15, 2013. Retrieved August 15, 2013. We begin with Pride, and end with Excellence. 
  4. ^ Montgomery County Department of Police (2001). "Mission, Vision and Values". Montgomery County Police: Serving Since 1922. Paducah, Kentucky: Turner Publishing. p. 8. ISBN 9781563116469. OCLC 49681807. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c Montgomery County Department of Police (2001). "1920s". Montgomery County Police: Serving Since 1922. Paducah, Kentucky: Turner Publishing. p. 18. ISBN 9781563116469. OCLC 49681807. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i "County police department celebrates 75th anniversary". The Gazette. 9030 Comprint Court, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 20877: Post-Newsweek Media, Inc. July 2, 1997. Archived from the original on January 15, 2014. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c d State of Maryland. "Montgomery County, Maryland - Government, Executive Branch, Public Safety: Department of Police". Maryland State Archives. State of Maryland. Retrieved January 15, 2014. Established on July 1, 1922, the Montgomery County Police Department absorbed law enforcement duties from the Montgomery County Sheriff and designated constables (Chapter 259, Acts of 1922). The Department was authorized to consist of three to six officers appointed by the Board of County Commissioners to two-year terms, with one officer designated as Chief. In 1927, the Department was expanded to twenty officers (Chapter 299, Acts of 1927). Today, the Department is comprised of over a thousand officers and personnel. From 1922 to 1935, the Board of County Commissioners designated one police officer within the Department to serve as Chief. In 1935, the position was altered so that the Board could appoint from any source, at their discretion (Chapter 9, Acts of 1935). When the County transitioned to a charter government in 1948, the duty of appointing the Police Chief transferred to the County Executive. Today, the Police Department provides crime prevention and protection services to the public, and investigates crimes when they occur. During emergencies, the Department works in cooperation with other federal, State and local law enforcement agencies, and supports emergency service providers. The Department is composed of the Internal Affairs Division, and four bureaus: Field Services, Investigative Services, Management Services, and Patrol Services. 
  8. ^ Brooks, Donald E.; Federline, Charles A. (1988). A Worthy Innovation: A History of the Montgomery County Police (July 4, 1922 – July 4, 1987). Rockville, Maryland: Montgomery County Department of Police. ASIN B007F6NHE8. OCLC 20132735. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  9. ^ a b Farag, Susan J. (January 17, 2012). "Briefing: Police Staffing" (PDF). Maryland. p. 3. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  10. ^ a b Griffith, Katie (January 5, 2012). "County Police Staffing Lags Behind National Average". Potomac Patch. Patch Media. Archived from the original on March 13, 2016. Retrieved March 13, 2016. We currently have 1,159 police officers. Three years ago we had 1,200. 
  11. ^ a b c Montgomery County Department of Police. "Public Safety". FY12 Operating Budget and Public Services Program (PDF). Maryland. p. 24–6. Archived from the original on March 15, 2016. Retrieved March 15, 2016. 
  12. ^ Montgomery County Department of Police (March 2004). "Vision and Mission Statements". Montgomery County Department of Police. Montgomery County. Archived from the original on August 17, 2012. Retrieved August 17, 2012. We, the Montgomery County Department of Police, are committed to providing the highest quality of police services to the people who live, work and visit our County. We will constantly evaluate and improve our efforts to enhance public safety with the goal of improving the quality of life within Montgomery County, while at the same time maintaining respect for individual rights and human dignity. The Mission of the Montgomery County Department of Police is to safeguard life and property, preserve the peace, prevent and detect crime, enforce the law, and protect the rights of all citizens. We are committed to working in partnership with the community to identify and resolve that impact public safety. 
  13. ^ a b Montgomery County Police Department (1952). "Montgomery County Police Department Officers - Silver Spring, 1952". Facebook. Facebook. Retrieved March 28, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b c d e "The News". Frederick, Maryland. July 9, 1930. Archived from the original on March 12, 2016. Retrieved March 12, 2016. Charles T. Cooley, 61, formerly of police for this county and at one time a member of the police force at Union Station, Washington, died Monday at his home at Capitol View, this county, following a long illness. Mr. Cooley was a native of Frederick county and had been a resident of this county about forty years. He was a veteran of the Spanish–American War, serving as a member of Company K, 1st Maryland Regiment, composed largely of Montgomery County men. Surviving are his wife, Mrs. May Etta Cooley; two sons, a daughter, a brother, four sisters, and his mother. 
  15. ^ "Sheriffs". Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Obituary". The Frederick Post. Maryland. July 16, 1970. Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
  17. ^ a b c d e "James S. McAuliffe, Sr. Dies". The Washington Post. The Washington Post Company. November 1, 1996. Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
  18. ^ a b c d e Wallace, Glenn (January 21, 2012). "Col James Stephen McAuliffe". Find a Grave. Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
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  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i Montgomery County Department of Police (2001). "1970s". Montgomery County Police: Serving Since 1922. Paducah, Kentucky: Turner Publishing. p. 28. ISBN 9781563116469. OCLC 49681807. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f Montgomery County Commission for Women Counseling & Career Center. "Carol A. Mehrling: First woman Chief of Police of Montgomery County" (PDF). Montgomery County Women’s History Archives. 401 N. Washington Street, Suite 100, Rockville Maryland, 20850. Archived from the original on September 5, 2012. Retrieved September 5, 2012. 
  22. ^ a b c d e f g "NOBLE: National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives". Paducah, Kentucky: Turner Publishing Company. 1998. p. 77. ISBN 1-56311-465-8. LCCN 98-88561. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
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  24. ^ Saperstein, Saundra (August 9, 1978). "Montgomery Police Express Anger". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C.: The Washington Post Company. Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
  25. ^ Valente, Judith; Lewis, Alfred E.; Johnson, Janis (March 15, 1979). "Crooke Picked as Montgomery Police Chief". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C.: The Washington Post Company. Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
  26. ^ "Exit Police Chief diGrazia". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C.: The Washington Post Company. December 10, 1978. Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
  27. ^ a b c d Duggan, Paul (February 24, 1988). "Montgomery's Chief of Police Bernard Crooke Jr., 54, Dies". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C.: The Washington Post Company. Retrieved March 12, 2016. 
  28. ^ Sullivan, Kevin (September 12, 1991). "2 Veterans On List For Chief; Potter Set to Fill Montgomery Post". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C.: The Washington Post Company. Retrieved March 12, 2016. Montgomery County Executive Neal Potter was preparing to decide last night between two locally prominent law enforcement officials to be the county's new chief of police. According to sources, one of the two is Richard Williams, a 23-year member of the county force known for his work in minority community relations. The other candidate is Clarence Edwards, the top officer of the county's Park Police department. 'It's down to two people,' said one source with firsthand knowledge of Potter's deliberations. 'At this point we are trying to decide between an inside candidate and an outside candidate.' Both candidates are black, and the appointment to head the 849-member county police department would bring to three the number of top positions in the Montgomery government filled by blacks. 
  29. ^ Montgomery County Department of Police (March 27, 2012). "Today We Remember Police Officer III Philip Carl Metz (1947–1981)". My MCP News. Maryland: Montgomery County Department of Police. Retrieved February 21, 2018. 
  30. ^ "Police Officer III Philip Carl Metz". ODMP. Retrieved August 26, 2017. 
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i Celender, Mark (February 17, 1999). "Pick outsider as police chief, NAACP tells Duncan". The Gazette. 9030 Comprint Court, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 20877: Post-Newsweek Media, Inc. Archived from the original on January 15, 2014. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  32. ^ a b c d e Thomson, Candus (May 5, 1999). "Montgomery officials, lawyers for family of slain black man meet: Unarmed victim shot by white officer during traffic stop". The Baltimore Sun. Rockville, Maryland. Archived from the original on January 15, 2014. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 'The officer obviously did not feel he had enough time to do anything other than what he did,' said acting Chief Thomas Evans. 
  33. ^ a b Fleming, Charles; Moose, Charles A. (September 15, 2003). Three Weeks in October: The Manhunt for the Serial Sniper. New York City, New York: E.P. Dutton. p. 13. ISBN 9780525947776. OCLC 52547597. Retrieved March 13, 2016. 
  34. ^ Lipton, Eric (February 18, 1997). "Montgomery Police Union Votes No Confidence in Chief; Mehrling Hasn't Defended Them, Officers Say". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  35. ^ Shaver, Katherine; Levine, Susan (November 18, 1998). "Mehrling to Retire Next Year; Montgomery Police Chief's Tenure Marked by Controversy". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2014. Chief Carol A. Mehrling, the first woman to head Montgomery County's police department and one of the top female law enforcement officers in the nation, will retire in February, ending a tenure marked by bringing police closer to many residents but criticisms from some minority groups and her own rank and file. Mehrling, 50, said yesterday that she is leaving because she always intended to serve only four years and she wants to spend more time with her family, particularly her aging parents. 
  36. ^ Mooar, Brian (February 3, 1995). "Duncan Gives Interim Police Chief the Job". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2014. Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan selected Maj. Carol A. Mehrling yesterday to become the county's first female police chief, saying she was "without question" the best person for the job. Mehrling, 46, of Gaithersburg, had served as interim chief since Duncan (D) took office in December, and she emerged from a nationwide search that drew 30 applicants from 13 states. 
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  38. ^ Perez-Rivas, Manuel; Shaver, Katherine (February 24, 1998). "Despite Critics, Police Chief Still in Charge; Montgomery Executive Says Mehrling Able to Correct Problems". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2014. She has received a vote of no confidence by her own police officers, her leadership skills have been criticized by community activists, and she recently was scolded by the county executive who appointed her three years ago this month. From the first day of her tenure as Montgomery County's first female police chief, Carol A. Mehrling has been a target for critics. She has been by far the most controversial of County Executive Douglas M. Duncan's departmental appointees, plagued in particular by persistent allegations that the county's 1,000-member force routinely mistreats or even abuses African Americans. 
  39. ^ Perez-Rivas, Manuel; Shaver, Katherine (November 19, 1998). "Montgomery Wants `Seasoned Manager' as Chief; Focus on Experience Could Rule Out Top Aides in Search for Mehrling's Successor". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2014. Montgomery County officials said yesterday that there is no clear front-runner to replace Police Chief Carol A. Mehrling, who announced Tuesday that she will retire in February, and they began organizing a nationwide search for her successor, saying they are looking for a 'seasoned manager.' The emphasis on management experience could mean the new chief will have to come from outside the force. The department's current leadership hasn't been in place long. Lt. Col. Thomas Evans was appointed deputy chief just five months ago. Of the department's three majors -- the next management level -- only one has been in his post more than a year. 
  40. ^ Mooar, Brian (November 27, 1996). "Montgomery Police Chief Heeds NAACP; Mehrling to Ask Outsiders To Look for Harassment". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2014. Responding to persistent NAACP allegations of widespread police harassment and excessive force against African Americans, Montgomery County Police Chief Carol A. Mehrling has offered to open her department to scrutiny by a civilian panel and an outside law enforcement group. Mehrling held a news conference yesterday to announce the formation of a citizens advisory group and her intention to appoint an African American liaison to help ease strained relations between her department and minority communities. 
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  46. ^ Fleming, Charles; Moose, Charles A. (September 15, 2003). Three Weeks in October: The Manhunt for the Serial Sniper. New York City, New York: E.P. Dutton. ISBN 9780525947776. OCLC 52547597. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  47. ^ a b c d e Montgomery County Department of Police. "About MCPD: A Message From Acting Chief Bill O'Toole". Archived from the original on January 16, 2004. Retrieved January 16, 2004. 
  48. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Douglas M. Duncan (January 30, 2004). "Remarks for County Executive Douglas M. Duncan - Swearing In Ceremony for Chief of Police J. Thomas Manger (as prepared)". Archived from the original on October 8, 2006. Retrieved October 8, 2006. 
  49. ^ a b c d e Montgomery County (2006). "Media ID: 06-441". Archived from the original on January 15, 2014. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  50. ^ Shaver, Katherine (February 13, 1998). "Montgomery Police Chief Criticized Over Accident; Shaken Mehrling Says She `Made a Big Mistake' by Not Telling Bosses of Car Crash". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2014. Montgomery County Police Chief Carol A. Mehrling came under renewed attack yesterday for running a red light and hitting another car -- without getting a ticket -- as her supervisors and some officers questioned why she didn't reveal the accident sooner. County Executive Douglas M. Duncan (D) said that he gave Mehrling "a good, old-fashioned chewing out" during a 30-minute meeting yesterday morning and that the incident will be factored into her annual job review this summer, possibly affecting any raise. 
  51. ^ a b c d e Montgomery County Department of Police (2013). "Office of the Chief". myMCPnews. 100 Edison Park Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland, 20878: Montgomery County. Archived from the original on August 16, 2013. Retrieved August 16, 2013. 
  52. ^ a b c d e Montgomery County (January 30, 2004). "J. Thomas Manger Takes the Oath of Office as New Chief of Police". Retrieved January 15, 2014. J. Thomas Manger takes the oath of office as Montgomery County's new Chief of Police. From left: County Executive Douglas M. Duncan; Chief Manger and his wife, Jacqueline Manger; Assistant Chief John King; Manger's parents, Tom and Mary Manger; and Clerk of the Circuit Court Molly Ruhl. Not pictured are Assistant Chiefs William O'Toole and Deirdre Walker. 
  53. ^ a b c d e Police Executive Research Forum (July 2012). "PERF Welcomes Three New Board Members" (PDF). Subject to Debate: Newsletter of the Police Executive Research Forum. 1120 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 930, Washington, D.C., 20036: Police Executive Research Forum. Archived from the original on January 15, 2014. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  54. ^ a b c d e Gallucci-White, Gina (May 2012). "Montgomery County Chief of Police J. Thomas Manger: Making a Difference in Public Safety". Montgomery Mag. 13232 Executive Park Terrace, Germantown, Maryland, 20874. Archived from the original on January 15, 2014. Retrieved January 15, 2014. 
  55. ^ Londono, Ernesto (October 5, 2007). "10 Police Officers Charged in Double-Dipping Probe". The Washington Post. Montgomery County, Maryland: Washington Post Company. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  56. ^ Manger, J. Thomas (November 21, 2013). "New Strategies for Countering Homegrown Violent Extremism". WINEP. Washington Institute For Near East Policy. Retrieved January 24, 2016. 
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  61. ^ Montgomery County Department of Police (January 30, 2014). "Detectives Investigate Shooting Involving Off-Duty Officer; Two Deceased after Domestic Incident". myMCPnews. Montgomery County Department of Police. Retrieved January 31, 2014. 
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  64. ^ "After I-270 Closure A Question Over Tactics". WTOP 103.5 FM. WTOP News. March 12, 2014. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
  65. ^ Morse, Dan (March 11, 2014). "Police Halt Montgomery County Commuters on I-270 to hunt for bank robbery suspects". The Washington Post. The Washington Post Company, Inc. Retrieved March 15, 2014. 
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  68. ^ Dempsey, E. Lancellotti (April 29, 2014). "Update of Today's Events". Northwest High School. Montgomery County Public Schools. Retrieved April 29, 2014. Good afternoon, this is Lance Dempsey, principal of Northwest High School, with an update for parents about today’s incident. At 10:51 am, the police cleared Northwest High School for re-entry after investigating a threat made against the school. I want to commend our students and staff for following our evacuation protocols and procedures. Based on the information we had from police this morning, we took appropriate action to ensure the safety and security of our students and staff. The police are continuing to investigate who made this threat against the school. If you have any information please contact the police directly. We are now resuming our instructional day today and will have counselors and staff on hand to speak to any students who are concerned or upset. Thank you for your cooperation and understanding. Please contact me if you have any questions or concerns. 
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External links

  • Official website
    • Secondary website
  • Montgomery County Police Department at the Wayback Machine (archived December 22, 2003)
  • Montgomery County Police Department at the Wayback Machine (archived October 1, 1999)
  • Montgomery County Police Department at the Wayback Machine (archived January 28, 1999)
  • Montgomery County Police Department at the Wayback Machine (archived December 3, 1998)
  • Montgomery County Police Department at the Wayback Machine (archived January 14, 1998)
  • Montgomery County Police Department at the Wayback Machine (archived January 21, 1997)
  • Montgomery County Police Department at the Officer Down Memorial Page
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