Mihama, Fukui

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Mihama
美浜町
Town
Mihama Town Hall
Mihama Town Hall
Flag of Mihama
Flag
Official seal of Mihama
Seal
Location of Mihama in Fukui Prefecture
Location of Mihama in Fukui Prefecture
Mihama is located in Japan
Mihama
Mihama
 
Coordinates: 35°36′2.2″N 135°56′26.1″E / 35.600611°N 135.940583°E / 35.600611; 135.940583Coordinates: 35°36′2.2″N 135°56′26.1″E / 35.600611°N 135.940583°E / 35.600611; 135.940583
Country Japan
Region Chūbu (Hokuriku)
Prefecture Fukui
District Mikata
Area
 • Total 152.35 km2 (58.82 sq mi)
Population (August 2018)
 • Total 9,643
 • Density 63/km2 (160/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
City symbols  
-Tree Pine
-Flower Rhododendron
Phone number 0770-32-1111
Address 25-25, Goichi, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui-ken 919-1192
Website www.town.mihama.fukui.jp
Mikata's five lakes

Mihama (美浜町, Mihama-chō) is a town located in Fukui Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 May 2018, the city had an estimated population of 9,643 in 3175 households and the population density of 63 persons per km².[1] The total area of the town was 152.35 square kilometres (58.82 sq mi).

Geography

Mihama is located in southwestern Fukui Prefecture, bordered by Shiga Prefecture to the south and the heavily indented ria coast of Wakasa Bay of Sea of Japan to the north. Parts of the town are within the borders of the Wakasa Wan Quasi-National Park.

Neighbouring municipalities

Climate

Mihama has a Humid climate (Köppen Cfa) characterized by warm, wet summers and cold winters with heavy snowfall. The average annual temperature in Mihama is 14.7 °C. The average annual rainfall is 2200 mm with September as the wettest month. The temperatures are highest on average in August, at around 27.1 °C, and lowest in January, at around 3.6 °C.[2]

Demographics

Per Japanese census data,[3] the population of Mihama has been experiencing a steep population decline..

Census Year Population
1970 13,157
1980 13,036
1990 13,222
2000 11,630
2010 10,563

History

Mihama is part of ancient Wakasa Province. During the Edo period, the area was part of the holdings of Obama Domain. Following the Meiji restoration, it was organised into part of Mikata District in Fukui Prefecture. With the establishment of the modern municipalities system on April 1, 1889, the villages of Kitasaigō, Minamisaigō, Mimi, and Santō were established. The four villages merged to form the town of Mihama on February 11, 1954.

On August 9, 2004, a non-radioactive steam leak killed five and burnt twelve others in the nearby Mihama Nuclear Power Plant; the high-pressure steam pipe lost 85% of its wall thickness and failed five days before its first inspection since 1976.[4]

Economy

The economy of Mihama, previously dependent on commercial fishing and agriculture, is now very heavily dependent on the nuclear power industry. The closure of the Mihama Nuclear Power Plant has since the 2011 Fukushima Nuclear Disaster has crippled the local economy.

Education

Mihama has three public elementary schools and one public middle school operated by the town government. The town does not have a high school.

Transportation

Railway

Highway

International relations

Local attractions

References

  1. ^ "Official website of Mihama Town" (in Japanese). Japan: Mihama Town. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  2. ^ Mihama climate data
  3. ^ Mihama population statistics
  4. ^ http://www.corrosion-doctors.org/NuclearIndustry/nuclear-accident-1.htm

External links

  • Media related to Mihama, Fukui at Wikimedia Commons
  • Official website (in Japanese)
  • Tourist website of Mihama (in Japanese)
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