Mental property

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A mental property or a mind property is a property of a/the mind. The term is mostly used in philosophy of mind, without prejudice as to the ontological status of mental properties. Examples might include general properties, such as being able to think or remember, or more specific actions such as "having a thought about Paris". The term is often used in the context of the mind body problem. For (non eliminative) physicalists, mental properties are a kind of high level property which can be understood in terms of fine-grained neural activity. Property dualists, on the other hand, claim that no such reductive explanation is possible. Eliminativists may reject the existence of mental properties, or at least of those corresponding to folk psychological categories such as thought and memory. Some philosophers seek to find a unifying characteristic for the generally accepted mental properties: a famous example is Franz Brentano's claim that all mental properties are characterised by intentionality or "aboutness".


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