Matthew Emerton

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Matthew James Emerton (born 1971[1]) is an Australian mathematician who is a professor of mathematics at the University of Chicago. His research interests include number theory, especially the theory of automorphic forms.[2] He ranks among the top 0.25% overall of users on MathOverflow,[3] where he has been known for his expository pieces on the Langlands program, his posts on algebraic geometry, and his posts on number theory.[4] He has also been known for helpful posts on cohomology theories.[5]

Early life and education

He earned his PhD in 1998 from Harvard University (where he studied under Barry Mazur and his PhD thesis was titled "2-Adic Modular Forms of Minimal Slope" [6]) and a BS (honors) from the University of Melbourne.[7]

Career

He joined the University of Chicago faculty in 2011. He received a NSF research grant for his “p-Adic Aspects of the Langlands Program”. [7]

References

  1. ^ "Matthew James Emerton Curriculum Vitae — September 2014" (PDF). Retrieved June 5, 2016.
  2. ^ "Matthew Emerton's Research Interests". Math.uchicago.edu. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  3. ^ "User Emerton - MathOverflow". Mathoverflow.net. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  4. ^ "Too Much Ain't Enough Langlands". Math.columbia.edu. Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  5. ^ "Matthew Emerton is smart and helpful". Retrieved March 28, 2016.
  6. ^ "The Mathematics Genealogy Project - Matthew Emerton". Genealogy.math.ndsu.nodak.edu. Retrieved March 13, 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Matthew Emerton". Retrieved March 13, 2016.
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