March 1944

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1944
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The following events occurred in March 1944:

March 1, 1944 (Wednesday)

March 2, 1944 (Thursday)

March 3, 1944 (Friday)

  • Joseph Stalin rejected British proposals to negotiate over the Polish-Soviet border.[6]
  • A night attack by the Japanese garrison on Los Negros was repulsed by the Americans.[5]
  • The Order of Nakhimov and Order of Ushakov military decorations were established in the Soviet Union.

March 4, 1944 (Saturday)

March 5, 1944 (Sunday)

March 6, 1944 (Monday)

  • American heavy bombers mounted the first-ever, full-scale daylight raid on Berlin.[10]
  • Soviet forces took Volochysk.[9]
  • Finland rejected a Soviet peace offer, objecting to the Soviet condition that all German troops in the country be interned and the 1940 borders be restored.[9]
  • German submarine U-744 was depth charged and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean by Allied warships.
  • German submarine U-973 was depth charged and sunk in the Arctic Ocean by Fairey Swordfish of 816 Naval Air Squadron.
  • Born: Kiri Te Kanawa, soprano, in Gisborne, New Zealand; Mary Wilson, singer and founding member of the Supremes, in Greenville, Mississippi

March 7, 1944 (Tuesday)

March 8, 1944 (Wednesday)

March 9, 1944 (Thursday)

  • The U.S. 5th Marine Regiment took Talasea in New Britain unopposed.[13]
  • American destroyer escort Leopold was torpedoed and heavily damaged by in the North Atlantic by German submarine U-255. The 28 survivors of the 191 crew were rescued and Leopold was abandoned to sink the next day.

March 10, 1944 (Friday)

March 11, 1944 (Saturday)

March 12, 1944 (Sunday)

March 13, 1944 (Monday)

  • The Soviet 28th Army captured Kherson.[17]
  • Italy and the Soviet Union restored diplomatic relations with one another.[7]
  • German submarine U-575 was depth charged and sunk in the Atlantic Ocean by Allied ships and aircraft.
  • Japanese cruiser Tatsuta was torpedoed and sunk off Hachijō-jima by the American submarine Sand Lance.
  • Died: Lev Shestakov, 38, Russian fighter ace (missing in action on the Eastern Front)

March 14, 1944 (Tuesday)

March 15, 1944 (Wednesday)

  • During the Battle of Monte Cassino the Allies dropped 992 tons of bombs on Monte Cassino Monastery and fired 195,000 rounds of artillery. British, Indian and New Zealand forces tried to storm the building but were unable to dislodge the Germans.[9]
  • German submarine U-653 was depth charged and sunk in the North Atlantic by British sloops Starling and Wild Goose.
  • British submarine Stonehenge was lost in the Indian Ocean on or around this date, presumably to a naval mine.

March 16, 1944 (Thursday)

March 17, 1944 (Friday)

March 18, 1944 (Saturday)

March 19, 1944 (Sunday)

March 20, 1944 (Monday)

March 21, 1944 (Tuesday)

March 22, 1944 (Wednesday)

  • The Red Army took Pervomaisk.[9]
  • Döme Sztójay replaced Miklós Kállay as Prime Minister of Hungary.
  • Authorities in German-controlled Hungary promulgated anti-Jewish legislation and ordered all Jewish businesses to close. Hundreds were sent to the Kistarcsa internment camp for political prisoners northeast of Budapest.[29]
  • The U.S. Office of Strategic Services began Operation Ginny II, once again intending to blow up railway tunnels in Italy to cut German lines of communication. The mission failed when the OSS team once again landed in the wrong place and were captured by the Germans two days later.
  • Volcanic stones of all sizes from Mount Vesuvius began raining down from the sky, forcing the evacuation of airmen of 340th Bombardment Group stationed at an airfield a few miles from the volcano. Once Vesuvius subsided they returned to base and found that about 80 of their B-25 bombers had been destroyed by hot ash.[23][24]
  • Died: Pierre Brossolette, 40, French journalist, politician and Resistance fighter (committed suicide while in Gestapo custody)

March 23, 1944 (Thursday)

March 24, 1944 (Friday)

March 25, 1944 (Saturday)

March 26, 1944 (Sunday)

  • The Battle of Sangshak ended in tactical Japanese victory but strategic British victory, since the British were able to hold off the Japanese long enough to send reinforcements to Kohima.
  • American submarine Tullibee sank north of Palau due to a torpedo malfunction. Only 1 of the 60 crew survived.
  • The fifteen members of the captured OSS team in Operation Ginny II were summarily executed by German forces under Hitler's Commando Order at the command of General Anton Dostler. After the war Dostler would be executed as a war criminal.
  • Born: Diana Ross, singer, songwriter, actress and music producer, in Detroit, Michigan

March 27, 1944 (Monday)

March 28, 1944 (Tuesday)

March 29, 1944 (Wednesday)

March 30, 1944 (Thursday)

  • The United States Navy began Operation Desecrate One, in which aircraft carriers launched attacks against Japanese bases on and around Palau. 36 Japanese ships were sunk or damaged in the attacks.
  • The RAF suffered its worst loss of the war in a raid on Nuremberg. 96 of 795 aircraft were shot down, and cloud over the city meant that only a small proportion of the force hit their target.[32]
  • Hitler sacked Erich von Manstein and Paul Ludwig Ewald von Kleist from their command posts on the Eastern Front and replaced them with Walter Model and Ferdinand Schörner.[32]
  • The British destroyer Laforey was torpedoed and sunk north of Palermo, Sicily by German submarine U-223, which was then depth charged and sunk by four British destroyers.

March 31, 1944 (Friday)

References

  1. ^ De Grand, Alexander J. (2000). Italian Fascism: Its Origins & Development (Third Edition). University of Nebraska Press. p. 134. ISBN 978-0-8032-6622-3. 
  2. ^ a b Lulushi, Albert (2016). Donovan's Devils: OSS Commandos Behind Enemy Lines - Europe, World War II (eBook). Arcade Publishing. ISBN 978-1-62872-622-0. 
  3. ^ Baldoli, Claudia; Knapp, Andrew (2012). Forgotten Blitzes: France and Italy Under Allied Air Attack, 1940–1945. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 229. ISBN 978-1-4411-8581-5. 
  4. ^ "Was war am 01. März 1944". chroniknet. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  5. ^ a b "Conflict Timeline, February 27 - March 6 1944". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  6. ^ Kersten, Krystyna (1991). The Establishment of Communist Rule in Poland, 1943–1948. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press. p. 44. ISBN 978-0-520-06219-1. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f Chronology and Index of the Second World War, 1938–1945. Research Publications. 1990. pp. 246–247. ISBN 978-0-88736-568-3. 
  8. ^ Radom, Todd (August 17, 2015). "'Radom Thoughs' - Logo Case Study #2 - 1944 Philadelphia Blue Jays/Phillies". Uni Watch. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "1944". MusicAndHistory. Retrieved March 1, 2016. [permanent dead link]
  10. ^ Dorr, Robert F. (2011). Mission to Berlin: The American Airmen Who Struck the Heart of Hitler's Reich (eBook). Zenith Press. ISBN 978-1-61060-262-4. 
  11. ^ "Events occurring on Tuesday, March 7, 1944". WW2 Timelines. 2011. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  12. ^ a b Mercer, Derrik, ed. (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 597. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3. 
  13. ^ "War Diary for Thursday, 9 March 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  14. ^ Newton, Michael (2014). Famous Assassinations in World History: An Encyclopedia. ABC-CLIO. p. 228. ISBN 978-1-61069-286-1. 
  15. ^ "Conflict Timeline, March 8-17 1944". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  16. ^ "Was war am 12. März 1944". chroniknet. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  17. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 13 March 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  18. ^ "Eire Isolation Near, Churchill Declares". Brooklyn Eagle. Brooklyn: p. 1. March 14, 1944. 
  19. ^ "War Diary for Tuesday, 14 March 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  20. ^ "Novel, Lauded by First Lady, Ruled Out as 'Obscene'". The Pittsburgh Press: p. 1. March 17, 1944. 
  21. ^ "70 years after the massacre in Rîbniţa (in Romanian)". Ştirile TV. March 18, 2014. 
  22. ^ "History and eruptions". Vesuvioinrete.it. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  23. ^ a b Orosz, Peter (November 21, 2011). "Mount Vesuvius caused more Allied bomber losses than a Nazi air raid". Jalopnik. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  24. ^ a b "The Day Mother Nature Entered World War II". October 13, 2013. KnowledgeNuts. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  25. ^ Beevor, Antony; Cooper, Artemis (2004). Paris After the Liberation, 1944–1949 (eBook). Penguin Books. ISBN 978-1-101-17507-1. 
  26. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 20 March 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  27. ^ "Conflict Timeline, March 18-27 1944". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  28. ^ "Finns Reject Peace Terms". The Singleton Argus. Singleton, N.S.W.: p. 1 March 22, 1944. 
  29. ^ Lindeman, Yehudi (2007). Shards of Memory: Narratives of Holocaust Survival. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers. p. 206. ISBN 978-0-275-99423-5. 
  30. ^ "War Diary for Saturday, 25 March 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  31. ^ "War Diary for Monday, 27 March 1944". Stone & Stone Second World War Books. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
  32. ^ a b c Davidson, Edward; Manning, Dale (1999). Chronology of World War Two. London: Cassell & Co. p. 186. ISBN 0-304-35309-4. 
  33. ^ "Conflict Timeline, March 28-April 6 1944". OnWar.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. 
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