Mani Ratnam filmography

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Mani Ratnam
Mani Ratnam at the Museum of the Moving Image, New York City, in 2015

Mani Ratnam is an Indian filmmaker who works predominantly in Tamil cinema. He is credited with redefining the "range and depth of Tamil cinema",[1] and is regarded as one of the greatest Indian filmmakers.[2] As of 2016, he has directed 24 films, and produced over 15 under his production company Madras Talkies.

Mani Ratnam made his directorial debut, without formal training or education in filmmaking, with the Kannada film Pallavi Anu Pallavi (1983). The critically acclaimed film, which he also wrote, won him the Karnataka State Film Award for Best Screenplay.[3] Following a string of commercial failures, he had his first box-office success with the 1985 Tamil film Idaya Kovil.[4] The following year, he made the romantic drama Mouna Ragam, which narrated the story of a young woman who is forced into an arranged marriage by her family.[5] The critical and commercial success of the film established him as a leading filmmaker in Tamil cinema.[6] His next release Nayakan, starring Kamal Haasan, was inspired by the life of the Bombay-based gangster Varadarajan Mudaliar.[7] The film was submitted by India as its official entry for the 60th Academy Awards. Later in 2005, Nayakan was included in Time's "All-Time 100 Movies" list.[8] Mani Ratnam followed this with the tragic romance Geethanjali (1989), which marked his Telugu cinema debut; the tragedy Anjali (1990),[a] which narrated the story of an autistic child; and the crime drama Thalapathi (1991), loosely adapted from the Indian epic Mahabharata.[10] In 1992, he made the romantic thriller Roja for Kavithalayaa Productions.[11] The film was dubbed into many Indian languages, including Hindi,[12] and its widespread success brought national recognition to Mani Ratnam.[13][14][15] Three years later, he made Bombay (1995), which was based on the 1992–93 Bombay riots.[13] Although controversial for its depiction of religious riots,[16] the film met with wide critical acclaim and became commercially successful in India.[17][18]

In 1997, Mani Ratnam co-produced and directed the political drama film Iruvar,[b] which was loosely based on the relationship between cinema and politics in Tamil Nadu.[19] The following year, he made his Bollywood debut with Dil Se.., the third film in his "terrorism trilogy".[c] A box-office failure in India, the film emerged as a success overseas; it became the first Indian film to be placed among the top 10 at the United Kingdom box-office.[21] In 2002, Mani Ratnam directed the critically acclaimed drama Kannathil Muthamittal, which was set against the backdrop of the Sri Lankan Civil War.[22] The commercial failure was the most successful film at the 50th National Film Awards, winning six honours including the award for the Best Feature Film in Tamil.[23][24] He returned to Bollywood after a six-year hiatus with the political drama Yuva (2004); the project was simultaneously filmed in Tamil as Aaytha Ezhuthu with a different cast.[25] His next release was the biographical film Guru (2007), a drama inspired by the life of the industrialist Dhirubhai Ambani.[26][27] In 2010, Mani Ratnam worked on the Tamil-Hindi bilingual Raavanan/Raavan, which was based on the Indian epic Ramayana.[28] Three years later, he produced and directed the crime drama Kadal, a critical and box office failure.[29] This was followed by O Kadhal Kanmani (2015), a romantic drama about a cohabiting couple. The critically acclaimed film was his first commercial success in the 2010s.[30][31]

Filmography

List of films contributed to by Mani Ratnam
Title Year Director Producer Writer Language Ref.
Pallavi Anu Pallavi 1983 Yes Yes Kannada [3]
Unaru 1984 Yes Malayalam [32]
Pagal Nilavu 1985 Yes Yes Tamil [32]
Idaya Kovil 1985 Yes Tamil [32]
Mouna Ragam 1986 Yes Yes Tamil [3]
Nayakan 1987 Yes Yes Tamil [3]
Agni Natchathiram 1988 Yes Yes Tamil [33]
Geethanjali 1989 Yes Yes Telugu [3]
Anjali 1990 Yes Yes Tamil [3]
Chatriyan 1990 Yes[d] Yes Tamil [34]
[35]
Thalapathi 1991 Yes Yes Tamil [3]
Roja 1992 Yes Yes Tamil [36]
Dasarathan 1993 Yes[d] Tamil [37]
Gaayam 1993 Yes[e] Telugu [38]
Thiruda Thiruda 1993 Yes Yes Tamil [39]
Bombay 1995 Yes Yes[d] Yes Tamil [40]
Indira 1995 Yes Tamil [41]
Aasai 1995 Yes[d] Tamil [41]
Iruvar 1997 Yes Yes[f] Yes Tamil [40]
Nerrukku Ner 1997 Yes[g] Tamil [42]
Dil Se.. 1998 Yes Yes[h] Yes Hindi [34]
[43]
Taj Mahal 1999 Yes[i] Tamil [44]
Alaipayuthey 2000 Yes Yes[f] Yes[i] Tamil [43]
Dumm Dumm Dumm 2001 Yes[f] Yes[j] Tamil [45]
Five Star 2002 Yes[f] Tamil [46]
Kannathil Muthamittal 2002 Yes Yes[f] Yes Tamil [43]
Saathiya 2002 Yes[g] Yes Hindi [47]
Yuva 2004 Yes Yes[f] Yes Hindi [48]
Aaytha Ezhuthu 2004 Yes Yes[f] Yes Tamil [49]
Guru 2007 Yes Yes[f] Yes Hindi [49]
Raavan 2010 Yes Yes[g] Yes Hindi [50]
Raavanan 2010 Yes Yes[g] Yes Tamil [50]
Kadal 2013 Yes Yes[g] Yes Tamil [51]
O Kadhal Kanmani 2015 Yes Yes[g] Yes Tamil [52]
Ok Jaanu 2017 Yes[g] Yes Hindi [53]
Kaatru Veliyidai 2017 Yes Yes[g] Yes Tamil [54]

Notes

  1. ^ The film was India's official entry to the 63rd Academy Awards.[9]
  2. ^ The film was the debut venture of Madras Talkies.
  3. ^ The preceding films are Roja and Bombay.[20]
  4. ^ a b c d Co-produced with S. Sriram under Aalayam Productions
  5. ^ Co-wrote with Ram Gopal Varma
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Co-produced with G. Srinivasan under Madras Talkies
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Produced under Madras Talkies
  8. ^ Co-produced with Shekhar Kapur and Ram Gopal Varma under the banner titled India Talkies
  9. ^ a b Co-wrote with R. Selvaraj
  10. ^ Co-wrote with R. Selvaraj and Azhagam Perumal

Citations

  1. ^ Indian Cinema. Mumbai: Directorate of Film Festivals. 1991. p. 18. 
  2. ^ Corliss, Richard (14 January 2010). "All-Time 100 Movies". Time. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 29 April 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g Ramachandran, Naman (2014). Rajinikanth: The Definitive Biography. London: Penguin Books. pp. 165–166. ISBN 978-81-8475-796-5. Archived from the original on 2017-01-08. 
  4. ^ Shiva Kumar, S (9 November 2012). "Leader for all times". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2016. 
  5. ^ Somaaya, Bhawana (2008). Fragmented Frames: Reflections of a Critic. New Delhi: Pustak Mahal. p. 278. ISBN 978-81-223-1016-0. Archived from the original on 2017-02-17. 
  6. ^ Ramnath, Nandini (8 February 2013). "Cinema Current: Mani Ratnam gestures hypnotically". Mint. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2016. 
  7. ^ Tejonmayam, U (7 October 2010). "'Nayagan' daughter planned to settle in US". The New Indian Express. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  8. ^ "A Brilliant Tribute To The Wonderful Kamal Haasan". The Times of India. 8 November 2014. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  9. ^ "India's Oscar failures". India Today. 16 February 2009. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  10. ^ "Happy Birthday Rajinikanth: How the superstar came to be". The Indian Express. 12 December 2015. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  11. ^ Ganti, Tejaswini (2004). Bollywood: A Guidebook to Popular Hindi Cinema. New York City: Psychology Press. p. 165. ISBN 978-0-415-28854-5. Archived from the original on 2017-02-17. 
  12. ^ Chandara, Anupama (15 November 1995). "Audible success". India Today. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  13. ^ a b Rai, Saritha (15 January 1995). "Falling in love with the 'Enemy'". India Today. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2016. 
  14. ^ "Will the dubbed ‘Enthiran’ work?". The New Indian Express. 7 September 2010. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  15. ^ Sivaswamy, Saisuresh (18 June 2010). "Vikram's Raavanan is better, as is Prithviraj's Dev". Rediff. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  16. ^ Biswas, Soutik (21 August 2014). "Why India loves to ban films". BBC. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2016. 
  17. ^ G. Tilak, Sudha; Jung Thapa, Vijay (15 April 1995). "Treading on a dangerous divide". India Today. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  18. ^ "Bombay: Interesting facts about the film". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  19. ^ Rangan 2012, pp. 164–165.
  20. ^ Ahmed, Omar (2015). Studying Indian Cinema. Leighton Buzzard: Auteur Publishing. p. 186. ISBN 978-0-9932384-9-9. Archived from the original on 2017-02-17. 
  21. ^ Sattar, Miral (27 October 2010). "Dil Se – 1998". Time. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  22. ^ Prabhakar, Jyothi (26 August 2014). "Films with Sri Lankan connect run into trouble in TN". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 30 April 2016. 
  23. ^ Pillai, Sreedhar (4 September 2002). "Switching over to action". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2016. 
  24. ^ "50th National Film Awards" (PDF). Directorate of Film Festivals. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 May 2016. Retrieved 22 April 2016. 
  25. ^ Ashraf, Syed Firdaus (19 May 2004). "'I am today's woman – very independent, very bindaas'". Rediff. Archived from the original on 12 June 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016. 
  26. ^ Bamzai, Kaveree (29 January 2007). "Polyester Perfect". India Today. Archived from the original on 24 May 2016. Retrieved 18 May 2016. 
  27. ^ Ashraf, Syed Firdaus (6 November 2006). "Abhishek goes the Ambani way". Rediff. Archived from the original on 24 May 2016. Retrieved 18 May 2016. 
  28. ^ Srivathsan, A. (11 July 2010). "Promises not kept". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 24 May 2016. Retrieved 18 May 2016. 
  29. ^ Bhaskaran, Gautaman (13 February 2013). "Mani Ratnam's Kadal in trouble". Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 12 June 2016. Retrieved 7 June 2016. 
  30. ^ "Mani Ratnam’s Tamil film 'O Kadhal Kanmani' mints over Rs.14 crore in 4 days of release". The Indian Express. 21 April 2015. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2016. 
  31. ^ "'Kanchana 2', 'OK Kanmani' rock the box office this week". Daily News and Analysis. 22 April 2015. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  32. ^ a b c Rangan 2012, p. 289.
  33. ^ Rangan 2012, p. 290.
  34. ^ a b Rangan 2012, p. 136.
  35. ^ Radhakrishnan, Vignesh (2 June 2015). "Happy b'day Ilayaraja-Mani Ratnam: 10 magical film scores of the duo". Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2016. 
  36. ^ Monti, Alessandro; Rozzonelli, Carole (21 March 2016). Experiments in Film Appreciation. Raleigh, North Carolina: Lulu. p. 42. ISBN 978-1-326-41841-0. Archived from the original on 22 March 2017. 
  37. ^ Rangan 2012, p. 125.
  38. ^ "When Mani Ratnam worked with RGV". The Times of India. 12 February 2013. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  39. ^ Rangan 2012, p. 291.
  40. ^ a b Rangan 2012, p. 292.
  41. ^ a b Rajadhyaksha, Ashish; Willemen, Paul (2014). Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema. Abingdon-on-Thames: Routledge. p. 197. ISBN 978-1-135-94318-9. 
  42. ^ Rajitha (17 August 1998). "Starry Sush". Rediff. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  43. ^ a b c Rangan 2012, p. 293.
  44. ^ "3 men and a movie". India Today. 6 April 1998. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 19 February 2016. 
  45. ^ Rajitha (28 April 2001). "Drums for Dum Dum Dum!". Rediff. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  46. ^ Kamath, Sudhish (7 October 2002). "A five star debut". The Hindu. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  47. ^ "Filmfare awards: 'Devdas' bags 11, 'Saathiya' 4". The Hindu. 23 February 2003. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  48. ^ "Shah Rukh, Rani Mukherjee bag awards". The Hindu. 28 February 2005. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  49. ^ a b Rangan 2012, p. 294.
  50. ^ a b Rangan 2012, p. 295.
  51. ^ Sidhardhan, Sanjith (15 August 2012). "50 crore for Mani Ratnam’s next?". The Times of India. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  52. ^ "28th Tokyo International Film Festival". Tokyo International Film Festival. Archived from the original on 5 May 2016. Retrieved 26 January 2016. 
  53. ^ "Ok Jaanu first look: Aditya Roy Kapoor, Shraddha Kapoor light up OK Kanmani remake, see pic". The Indian Express. 9 December 2016. Archived from the original on 12 December 2016. Retrieved 12 December 2016. 
  54. ^ Sundar, Priyanka (17 March 2017). "Mani Ratnam’s Kaatru Veliyidai official release date announced". The Indian Express. Archived from the original on 21 March 2017. Retrieved 21 March 2017. 

References

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