Maine-et-Loire

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Maine-et-Loire
Department
Prefecture building of the Maine-et-Loire department, in Angers
Prefecture building of the Maine-et-Loire department, in Angers
Coat of arms of Maine-et-Loire
Coat of arms
Location of Maine-et-Loire in France
Location of Maine-et-Loire in France
Coordinates: 47°27′N 0°36′W / 47.450°N 0.600°W / 47.450; -0.600Coordinates: 47°27′N 0°36′W / 47.450°N 0.600°W / 47.450; -0.600
Country France
Region Pays de la Loire
Prefecture Angers
Subprefectures Cholet
Saumur
Segré
Government
 • President of the General Council Christophe Béchu (UMP)
Area1
 • Total 7,172 km2 (2,769 sq mi)
Population (2013)
 • Total 800,191
 • Rank 27th
 • Density 110/km2 (290/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
Department number 49
Arrondissements 4
Cantons 21
Communes 186
^1 French Land Register data, which exclude estuaries, and lakes, ponds, and glaciers larger than 1 km2

Maine-et-Loire (French pronunciation: ​[mɛn.e.lwaʁ]) is a department in west-central France, in the Pays de la Loire region.

History

See also: Anjou and History of Maine-et-Loire (fr)

Maine-et-Loire is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution on March 4, 1790. Originally it was called Mayenne-et-Loire, but its name was changed to Maine-et-Loire in 1791. It was created from most of the former province of Anjou. Its present name is drawn from the Maine and Loire Rivers, which meet within the department.

Geography

Maine-et-Loire is part of the current region of Pays-de-la-Loire and is surrounded by the departments of Ille-et-Vilaine, Mayenne, Sarthe, Indre-et-Loire, Vienne, Deux-Sèvres, Vendée, and Loire-Atlantique. The principal city is Angers.

It has a varied landscape, with forested ranges of hills in the south and north separated by the valley of the Loire. The highest point is Colline des Gardes at 210 m (690 ft).

The area has many navigable rivers such as the Loire, Sarthe, Mayenne, Loir, and Authion.

Demographics

The inhabitants of Maine-et-Loire have no official qualifier. They are sometimes known as Angevins, from the former province of Anjou, or Mainéligériens, from the name of the département.[1]

Tourism

  • The Loire Valley and its castles.
  • The largest vineyard of the Loire Valley.
  • The boule de fort, the traditional boules game in Anjou

Angers and around:

Saumur and around:

Cholet and around:

Segré and around:

  • The fortified city of Pouancé and its medieval castle.
  • The Blue Mine, a slate mine, with a funicular which goes 130 meters under the surface.
  • The National stud of Le Lion-d'Angers, which host every year Le Mondial du Lion
  • The Château de Challain-la-Potherie

See also

References

  1. ^ "Vous voulez vous appeler Angevin ou Mainoligérien ? Dernier jour pour voter !". ouest-france.fr. Ouest France. Retrieved 30 July 2014. 

External links

  • (in French) Prefecture website
  • (in French) General council website
  • (in English) Anjou Tourism Board website
  •  "Maine-et-Loire". Collier's New Encyclopedia. 1921. 


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