Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon National Scenic Area

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Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon National Scenic Area
Loch Rannoch.jpg
Looking across Loch Rannoch towards Schiehallion
Map showing the location of Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon National Scenic Area
Map showing the location of Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon National Scenic Area
The location of Loch Rannoch, which lies in the northern part of the NSA, shown within Perth and Kinross.
Location Perth and Kinross and Stirling (council area), Scotland
Coordinates 56°40′59″N 4°18′50″W / 56.68306°N 4.31389°W / 56.68306; -4.31389Coordinates: 56°40′59″N 4°18′50″W / 56.68306°N 4.31389°W / 56.68306; -4.31389
Area 486 km2 (188 sq mi)[1]
Established 1981
Governing body Scottish Natural Heritage

The Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon National Scenic Area is a national scenic area (NSA) covering the area surrounding Loch Rannoch, Glen Lyon, and the Ben Lawers ranges of mountains in Scotland.[2] It is one of 40 such areas in Scotland, which are defined so as to identify areas of exceptional scenery and to ensure its protection from inappropriate development by restricting certain forms of development.[3] The Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon NSA covers 48,625 ha,[1][4] most of which lies in the council area of Perth and Kinross, with a small portion lying in Stirling.[5]

National scenic areas are primarily designated due to the scenic qualities of an area, however NSAs may well have other special qualities, for example related to culture, history, archaeology, geology or wildlife.[6] Areas with such qualities may be protected via other national and international designations that overlap with the NSA designation. Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon includes a National nature reserve at Ben Lawers, and there are three Special Areas of Conservation and one Special Protection Area within the NSA.[7]

Creation of the national scenic area

Following the Second World War, a committee, chaired by Sir Douglas Ramsay, was established to consider preservation of the landscape in Scotland. The report, published in 1945 proposed that five areas (Loch Lomond and the Trossachs, the Cairngorms, Glen Coe-Ben Nevis-Black Mount, Wester Ross and Glen Strathfarrar-Glen Affric-Glen Cannich) should receive a level of protection.[8] The government therefore designated these areas as "national park direction areas", giving powers for planning decisions taken by local authorities to be reviewed by central government. Following a further review of landscape protection in 1978, additional areas, including the hills and glens to the east of Rannoch Moor, were identified as worthy of protection due to their landscape qualities. Accordingly, in 1981 the direction areas were replaced by the national scenic area designation, which were based on the 1978 recommendations and thus included the area entitled Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon.[9] The defined area remains as originally mapped in 1978, but was redesignated under new legislation in 2010.[10]

Although the national scenic area designation provides a degree of additional protection via the planning process, there are no bodies equivalent to a national park authority,[11] and whilst local authorities (in this case Perth and Kinross Council and Stirling Council) can produce a management strategy for each one, only the three national scenic areas within Dumfries and Galloway have current management strategies.[12]

Geography

Main articles: Ben Lawers, Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon

The designated area covers much of the historical province of Breadalbane, and covers landscapes ranging from flat, fertile farmland up to exposed mountain summits.[5] Ben Lawers, at 1214 m, is the highest point in the highest and most extensive mountain massif in the southern part of the Scottish Highlands.[13] Schiehallion, an isolated peak lying in the east of the NSA, is one of the most prominent mountains in Scotland.

The area is drained by two tributaries of the River Tay: the River Tummel (which drains Loch Rannoch) and the River Lyon, which flows through Glen Lyon.[2] Most human settlement and activity has been concentrated along these two rivers; many of the smaller side glens also contain visible signs of previous occupations, for example in the presence of old shielings.[5] The area contains fragments of the ancient Caledonian pinewood, along with areas of native birchwood.[5]

Other conservation designations

There are a number of other protected areas that overlap to some extent with the national scenic area.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b "National Scenic Areas - Maps". SNH. 2010-12-20. Retrieved 2018-01-24.
  2. ^ a b "Map: Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon National Scenic Area" (PDF). Scottish Natural Heritage. December 2010. Retrieved 2018-03-19.
  3. ^ "National Scenic Areas". Scottish Natural Heritage. Retrieved 2018-01-17.
  4. ^ "Loch Rannoch and Glen Lyon". Protected Planet. Retrieved May 25, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d "The special qualities of the National Scenic Areas" (PDF). Scottish Natural Heritage. 2010. pp. 105–113. Retrieved 2018-01-24.
  6. ^ "The special qualities of the National Scenic Areas" (PDF). Scottish Natural Heritage. 2010. p. 2. Retrieved 2018-05-15.
  7. ^ "History Leading to the Cairngorms National Park". Cairngorms National Park Authority. Retrieved 2018-01-15.
  8. ^ "National Scenic Areas Review" (PDF). SNH. 1997. Retrieved 2018-02-05.
  9. ^ "National Scenic Areas: background, guidance and policy". SNH. Retrieved 2018-01-31.
  10. ^ "Development management and National Scenic Areas". SNH. 2017. Retrieved 2018-01-23.
  11. ^ "National Scenic Areas (NSAs)". Dumfries and Galloway council. 2017-12-08. Retrieved 2018-01-24.
  12. ^ D. Bennet & R. Anderson. The Munros: Scottish Mountaineering Club Hillwalkers Guide, pp. 30-32. Published 2016.
  13. ^ "Site Details for Ben Lawers NNR". Scottish Natural Heritage. 2018-04-05. Retrieved 2018-04-24.
  14. ^ "Ben Lawers National Nature Reserve". National Trust for Scotland. Retrieved 2018-04-24.
  15. ^ NTS Guide (2018).
  16. ^ "Site Details for Ben Lawers SAC". Scottish Natural Heritage. 2018-04-05. Retrieved 2018-04-24.
  17. ^ "Site Details for River Tay SAC". Scottish Natural Heritage. 2018-04-05. Retrieved 2018-04-24.
  18. ^ "Site Details for Black Wood of Rannoch SAC". Scottish Natural Heritage. 2018-04-05. Retrieved 2018-04-24.
  19. ^ Ordnance Survey Landranger 1:50000 Map. Sheet 51. Loch Tay and Glen Rannoch
  20. ^ "Site Details for Rannoch Lochs SPA". Scottish Natural Heritage. 2018-04-05. Retrieved 2018-04-24.
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