List of tallest buildings in Tysons, Virginia

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The Tysons skyline viewed from the Silver Line in 2014

Tysons (also known by its former official name Tysons Corner),[a] a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community in Fairfax County, Virginia, contains at least 18 high-rise buildings that stand 200 feet (61 m) or taller.[1] Completed in 2015, VITA Tysons Corner is presently the tallest high-rise building in Tysons at 367 feet (112 m).[2]

History

Development by the military and intelligence sectors in Tysons began in 1952 with the construction of a 330-foot (100 m) microwave transmission tower, known as the Tysons Corner Communications Tower, by the United States Army.[3] Built upon the highest elevation in Fairfax County,[4][5] the tower relayed microwave transmissions between Washington, D.C. and government facilities near the Blue Ridge Mountains to enable emergency continuity of government.[3] Tysons itself was a rural crossroads community until 1961, when the Central Intelligence Agency completed its headquarters in nearby Langley.[6] This spurred defense contractors to setup offices in Tysons.[6] In 1962, real estate developer WestGroup received county approval to build its WestGate and WestPark office parks in Tysons which were among the first in the area.[6] That same year, the county also approved plans for Lerner Enterprises to build the Tysons Corner Center shopping mall, which subsequently opened in 1968.[6]

Aerial image of Tysons in 2010

By the mid-1980s, the Fairfax County supervisors approved an easing of the county's 75-foot (23 m) height limit to allow for the construction of the never-built 204-foot (62 m) Tysons Tower office building at the intersection of the Capital Beltway and Virginia Route 7.[7] By 1985, Fairfax County officials considered a plan to construct "gateways" which consisted of pairs of buildings as high as 22 stories or 215 feet (66 m) at key intersections along the Capital Beltway, the Dulles Access Road, Virginia Route 7, and Virginia Route 123. County officials sought to make Tysons into Fairfax County's "new downtown."[7][8] The plan also called for proposing a rooftop height limit of 730 feet (220 m) as the maximum height for future construction projects.[8]

In June 2010, the Fairfax County supervisors authorized a plan to transform Tysons from an automobile-dependent suburb into a "walkable city."[9] By 2011, Tysons had 26,700,000 square feet (2,480,000 m2) of office space; higher than the metropolitan areas of San Antonio, Texas and Jacksonville, Florida.[6] Increased high-rise construction in Tysons was further spurred by the opening of the Silver Line of the Washington Metro, which has four stations in Tysons: Spring Hill, Greensboro, Tysons Corner, and McLean.[10][11] The Capital One Headquarters, currently under construction near the McLean station, will be the tallest building in Tysons upon completion at 470 feet (140 m) and will be the second-tallest structure in the Washington metropolitan area after the Washington Monument (which stands 554 feet 7 1132 inches (169.046 m)).[12] 1775 Tysons Boulevard, constructed by Lerner Enterprises near Tysons Corner station, is the first building in Tysons to achieve platinum status under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building rating system and among the first in the Washington metropolitan area.[13]

According to CoStar Group, a commercial real estate information and marketing provider, Tysons has the eighth largest retail square footage in the United States with 4,800,000 square feet (450,000 m2).[10] Tysons is home to the corporate headquarters of five Fortune 500 companies: Freddie Mac, Capital One, Hilton Worldwide, Booz Allen Hamilton, and Gannett Company.[14]

The skyline of Tysons photographed at nighttime
The skyline of Tysons photographed at nighttime (2012)

Tallest buildings

There are at least 18 completed or topped out skyscrapers in Tysons that stand at least 200 feet (61 m) tall, based on standard height measurement which includes spires and architectural details but does not include antenna masts.[1] An equal sign (=) following a rank indicates the same height between two or more buildings. An asterisk (*) indicates that the building is still under construction, but has been topped out. The "Year" column indicates the year in which a building was completed.

Rank Name[b] Image Height
ft (m)
Floors Year completed Notes
1 VITA Tysons Corner VITA Tysons Corner
367 (112) 30 2015 [15][16][17][18]
2 Adaire Adaire
360 (110) 34 2016 Formerly known as The Elan.[19][20][21]
Tysons Corner Communications Tower 330 (100) 1952 [3][22][23]
3 Tysons Tower Tysons Tower
318 (97) 22 2014 [24][25]
4 Ascent at Spring Hill Station Ascent at Spring Hill Station
275 (84) 26 2014 [26][27]
5 Ritz-Carlton Tysons Corner Ritz-Carlton Tysons Corner
254 (77) 24 1999 [28]
6 1850 Towers Crescent Plaza 253 (77) 13 2009 [29]
7 1775 Tysons Boulevard 1775 Tysons Boulevard
237 (72) 17 2016 [30][31]
8 1650 Tysons Boulevard 1650 Tysons Boulevard
236 (72) 17 1989 [32]
9 1750 Tysons Boulevard 1750 Tysons Boulevard
235 (72) 17 1999 [33]
10 8000 Towers Crescent Drive 234 (71) 17 1985 Also known locally as "The Shopping Bag" for its distinctive shape, and formerly known as Tycon Center and Tycon Towers.[34][35][36]
11 Capital One Tower Capital One Tower 227 (69) 14 2002 [37]
12 Gannett Corporate Headquarters Gannett Corporate Headquarters 226 (69) 11 2001 [38]
13 Sheraton Tysons Hotel Sheraton Tysons Hotel
215 (66) 24 1986 [7][39]
14= Ovation at Park Crest 214 (65) 19 2014 [40][41]
14= Hyatt Regency Tysons Corner Hyatt Regency Tysons Corner
214 (65) 17 2015 [42][43]

Completed buildings with heights estimated over 200 feet

Name Image Floors Year completed Notes
Nouvelle Nouvelle
27 2015 Also known as Nouvelle at Arbor Row.[44]
One Park Crest 19 2008 [45]
Pinnacle Towers North 17 1989 Formerly known as First Union Center.[46]

Tallest buildings under construction or proposed

Under construction

There are at least four buildings under construction in Tysons that are expected to rise at least 200 feet (61 m).

Name Image Height*
ft (m)
Floors Year* Notes
Capital One Headquarters Tower Capital One McLean 2.jpg 470 (140) 31 2017 Upon completion, it will be the second-tallest structure in the Washington metropolitan area after the Washington Monument[12][47][48]
Lumen at Tysons 413 (126) 32 2018 Also known as Tysons Central Building F.[49][50][51]
The Boro Building A/B 351 (107) 2019 Also known as Greensboro Metro Tower.[52][53]
The Boro Building C 276 (84) 20 2018 [54]

Proposed

There are numerous buildings proposed in Tysons that are expected to rise at least 200 feet (61 m).

Name Height
ft (m)
Floors Notes
Iconic Tower at The View 615 (187) 48 If built, will be the tallest structure in the Greater Washington region.[55][56]
Building C-2-B at The View 420 (130)  ? [56]
Building C1 at Dominion Square 400 (120) 33 [57]
Johnson Building B at Scotts Run South 397 (121) 32 [58]
Johnson Building A at Scotts Run South 363 (111) 29 [58]
Building C2 at Dominion Square 360 (110) 29 [57]
Grant Building A at Scotts Run South 350 (110) 28 [58]
Building 1 at Capital One 348 (106) 26 [59]
Building C-2-A at The View 338 (103)  ? [56]
Building C-1-B at The View 335 (102)  ? [56]
Building C at Scotts Run North 325 (99) 25 [60]
Building C7 at Dominion Square 325 (99) 23 [57]
Building A at Scotts Run North 322 (98) 28 [60]
Building C-1-A at The View 310 (94)  ? [56]
Building C8 at Dominion Square 300 (91) 22 [57]
Building C10 at Dominion Square 300 (91) 22 [57]
Building S1 at Sunburst 280 (85) 28 [61]
Building C3 at Dominion Square 280 (85) 28 [57]
Johnson Building C at Scotts Run South 276 (84) 28 [58]
Building 12 at Capital One 276 (84)  ? [59]
Tower A at Greensboro 275 (84) 26 [62]
Johnson Building D at Scotts Run South 271 (83) 28 [58]
1725 Tysons Boulevard 270 (82) 23 [63]
Building S2 at Sunburst 270 (82) 27 [61]
Building C4 at Dominion Square 270 (82) 27 [57]
Building C5 at Dominion Square 260 (79) 27 [57]
Building C6 at Dominion Square 260 (79) 27 [57]
Building C9 at Dominion Square 250 (76) 25 [57]
Building C12 at Dominion Square 250 (76) 25 [57]
Taylor Building B at Scotts Run South 246 (75) 21 [58]
Building 2 at Anderson Park 245 (75) 22 [64][65]
Building 5 at Anderson Park 245 (75) 22 [64][65]
Building 6 at Anderson Park 245 (75) 22 [64][65]
Building S4 at Sunburst 245 (75) 20 [61]
Grant Building B at Scotts Run South 243 (74) 24 [58]
Building 11 at Capital One 238 (73)  ? [59]
Building 7 at Capital One 236 (72)  ? [59]
Tower B at Greensboro 235 (72) 22 [62]
Westgate Building A at Scotts Run South 222 (68) 18 [58]
Building S3 at Sunburst 220 (67) 18 [61]
Building D at Scotts Run North 215 (66) 17 [60]
Lincoln Building A at Scotts Run South 211 (64) 18 [58]
Building 4 at Capital One 211 (64)  ? [59]
Van Buren Building A at Scotts Run South 208 (63) 21 [58]
Building 8 at Capital One 207 (63)  ? [59]

See also

References

Explanatory notes

a. ^ The United States Census Bureau officially began referring to the census-designated place of Tysons Corner as Tysons in Summer 2016. The name Tysons was first unofficially adopted in 2012 by the Tysons Partnership, a nonprofit association of area businesses and stakeholders.[66][67]
b. ^ An asterisk (*) indicates that the building is still under construction, but has been topped out.

Citations

  1. ^ a b Emporis. "Tysons Corner". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  2. ^ Kettler. "VITA Tysons Corner Center Fact Sheet" (PDF). Kettler website. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c Ceruzzi, Paul E. (2008). Internet Alley: High Technology in Tysons Corner, 1945–2005. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. p. 42. ISBN 978-0-262-03374-9. OCLC 221647447 – via Google Books. 
  4. ^ Elvin, Bill (October 10, 2000). "Tall tank going up at high spot: New water tower to increase pressure in Tysons". Fairfax Times. Reston, Virginia. Archived from the original on April 10, 2013. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  5. ^ General Services Administration (1982). Ten-year Space Acquisition Program: Environmental Impact Statement. Washington, D.C.: General Services Administration. p. 135. OCLC 29816154 – via Google Books. 
  6. ^ a b c d e O'Connell, Jonathan (September 24, 2011). "Tysons Corner: The building of an American city". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c Turcol, Thomas (October 6, 1985). "'Gateway' High-Rise Plan Alarms Tysons Residents". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  8. ^ a b McAllister, Marcia (February 9, 1985). "Taller Tysons Buildings". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2017. 
  9. ^ Hosh, Kafia A.; Kravitz, Derek (June 23, 2010). "Fairfax County supervisors authorize transformation of Tysons Corner". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  10. ^ a b Meyer, Eugene L. (June 24, 2014). "Tysons, a Northern Virginia Crossroads, Waits Impatiently for the Train". The New York Times. New York City. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  11. ^ Shaver, Katherine (July 2, 2016). "Metro's Silver Line jump-started the Tysons boom, but some say it's too much too soon". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  12. ^ a b O'Connell, Jonathan (May 16, 2014). "Fairfax approves Capital One HQ nearly as tall as the Washington Monument". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 7, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  13. ^ O'Connell, Jonathan (July 30, 2015). "Ted Lerner’s bet on Silver Line gets its reward". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 7, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  14. ^ O'Connell, Jonathan (July 22, 2014). "Six defining stats about Tysons as it enters the Silver Line era". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2017. 
  15. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 2012-AEA-5310-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  16. ^ O'Connell, Jonathan (February 28, 2014). "Tysons 2.0 begins to take shape". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  17. ^ O'Connell, Jonathan (January 15, 2014). "With Silver Line coming, Tysons developers weigh how many apartments to build". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  18. ^ Kettler. "VITA". Kettler website. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  19. ^ Jones Lang LaSalle Northern Virginia (2014). Tysons Spring Hill Station: Life Productive (PDF) (Report). Jones Lang LaSalle Northern Virginia. p. 23. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2017. 
  20. ^ Emporis. "Adaire". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  21. ^ Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. "Adaire". The Skyscraper Center. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  22. ^ Federal Communications Commission. "Registration 1209914". Federal Communications Commission Antenna Structure Registration website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  23. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 2000-AEA-248-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  24. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 2012-AEA-1711-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  25. ^ Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. "Tysons Tower". The Skyscraper Center. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  26. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 2012-AEA-2005-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  27. ^ WDG. "The Ascent at Spring Hill Station". WDG website. Archived from the original on February 9, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  28. ^ Emporis. "Ritz-Carlton Tysons Corner". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  29. ^ Emporis. "1850 Towers Crescent Plaza". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  30. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 2009-AEA-3798-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  31. ^ Emporis. "1775 Tysons Boulevard". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  32. ^ Emporis. "1650 Tysons Boulevard". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  33. ^ Emporis. "1750 Tysons Boulevard". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  34. ^ Emporis. "8000 Towers Crescent Drive". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  35. ^ Carton, Barbara (July 16, 1987). "Tall Talk of the Town". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 28, 2017. 
  36. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 1984-AEA-1515-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  37. ^ Emporis. "Capitol One Tower". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  38. ^ Emporis. "Gannett Corporate Headquarters". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  39. ^ Fairfax County Department of Planning and Zoning (2013). Area II, Tysons Corner Urban Center, Amended through 4-29-2014, District Recommendations (PDF). Fairfax County Comprehensive Plan 2013 Edition (Report). Fairfax County Department of Planning and Zoning. p. 124. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  40. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 2015-AEA-2186-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  41. ^ Emporis. "Ovation at Park Crest". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  42. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 2013-AEA-466-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  43. ^ Emporis. "Hyatt Regency Tysons Corner Center". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  44. ^ Emporis. "Nouvelle Apartments". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  45. ^ Emporis. "One Park Crest". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  46. ^ Emporis. "Pinnacle Towers North". Emporis.com. Retrieved January 30, 2017. 
  47. ^ WTOP-FM (November 17, 2014). "Ground broken for region’s 2nd tallest building". WTOP.com. Archived from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  48. ^ Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. "Capitol One Headquarters". The Skyscraper Center. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  49. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Form 7460-1 for ASN 2015-AEA-5749-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on February 3, 2017. Retrieved February 3, 2017. 
  50. ^ Emporis. "Lumen at Tysons". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on February 4, 2017. Retrieved February 4, 2017. 
  51. ^ Lerner, Michelle (November 30, 2016). "Mixed-use project with 398 apartments to rise in Tysons". The Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 2, 2017. Retrieved February 4, 2017. 
  52. ^ Neibauer, Michael (September 15, 2015). "Foulger-Pratt pitches 'cutting edge' office tower for major Tysons corner". Washington Business Journal. Washington, D.C. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  53. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Archive Search Results Form 7460-1 for ASN 2016-AEA-11295-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  54. ^ Federal Aviation Administration. "Determined Cases for VA Form 7460-1 for ASN 2016-AEA-10182-OE". Federal Aviation Administration Obstruction Evaluation/Airport Airspace Analysis (OE/AAA) website. Archived from the original on January 29, 2017. Retrieved January 29, 2017. 
  55. ^ "DC Region's Tallest Building Proposed In Tysons". Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  56. ^ a b c d e "‘The View at Tysons’ would emerge as tallest in the region". Inside NoVa. Aug 7, 2017. Retrieved August 8, 2017. 
  57. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Dominion Square – CARS (RZ 2011-HM-012 & 013)". Retrieved July 26, 2017. 
  58. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Scotts Run Station South (RZ 2011-PR-010/011)". Retrieved March 24, 2017. 
  59. ^ a b c d e f "Capital One (PCA 2010-PR-021)". Retrieved July 26, 2017. 
  60. ^ a b c "Scotts Run Station North (RZ 2011-PR-009)". Retrieved March 24, 2017. 
  61. ^ a b c d "Sunburst (RZ 2011-HM-027)". Retrieved March 24, 2017. 
  62. ^ a b "Greensboro (RZ/FDP 2012-PR-002)". Retrieved March 24, 2017. 
  63. ^ Emporis. "1725 Tysons Boulevard". Emporis.com. Archived from the original on January 28, 2017. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  64. ^ a b c "The Commons (RZ 2011-PR-017)". Retrieved March 24, 2017. 
  65. ^ a b c "Commons Of McLean Redevelopment Gets A New Name". Retrieved March 27, 2017. 
  66. ^ Gilgore, Sara (November 9, 2015). "Tysons to officially drop 'Corner' from name in Census Bureau decision". Washington Business Journal. Washington, D.C. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 
  67. ^ Reilly, Corinne; Zapana, Victor (October 4, 2012). "Tysons Corner is unofficially dropping the ‘corner’ from its name". Washington Post. Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on February 8, 2016. Retrieved January 27, 2017. 

Further reading

External links

  • Media related to High-rises in Tysons, Virginia at Wikimedia Commons
  • Tysons Development Activity
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