List of tallest buildings in North Hudson

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

North Hudson comprises the municipalities of Weehawken, Union City, West New York, Guttenberg and North Bergen in Hudson County, New Jersey. With a 2010 United States Census population of 201,000, the contiguous urban area, one of most densely populated places in the nation, is largely situated atop the Palisades on the Hudson Waterfront of west bank of the Hudson River.

On the Palisades overlooking the Hudson, from left to right: The Riveria, Tower West, The Versailles, The Galaxy, Parker Imperial, and the Stonehenge were built in the 1960s-1970s.The cluster of high-rises on Boulevard East is situated on the Hudson Waterfront between the tallest buildings in Jersey City and in Fort Lee.

The area lies north of Hoboken and Jersey City across the river from Midtown Manhattan and Upper West Side in New York City and east of the New Jersey Meadowlands. Its high elevation of about 260 ft (79 m)[1] affords North Hudson expansive views of the Manhattan skyline to east and the Meadowlands, and beyond to the Watchung Mountains, to the west. Many of the tall buildings are part of string of residential high-rises that continues north along the Boulevard East-Palisade Avenue-River Road corridors into the eastern Bergen County towns of Cliffside Park, Edgewater and Fort Lee. Many of the buildings went up during a boom in development in the late 1960s and early 1970s.[2][3]

Buildings over 250 feet (76 m)

Church of Saint Michael the Archangel was completed c.1875 and rises 176 ft (54 m)
The Weehawken Water Tower, 175 ft (53 m) tall, was built in 1883
The Hudson County Brewing Company headquarters circa 1901 in what was West Hoboken, was razed in 1930s on site of the also demolished Roosevelt Stadium

.

Rank Name Image Height
ft / m
Floors Year Locale Notes
1,2,3 Galaxy Towers Galaxy-towers.jpg 415 feet (126 m) 44 1971 Boulevard East
Guttenberg
[4]
4 The Stonehenge StonehengeNorthBergen.tiff 369 feet (112 m) 34 1967 Boulevard East
Woodcliff
North Bergen
[5]
5 Parker Imperial ParkerImperialBlvdEastNorthBergen.tiff 366 ft (112 m) 30 1973 Boulevard East
Woodcliff
North Bergen
[6]
6 Riviera Towers Riveria(highrise)BlvdEastWNY.jpg 359 ft (109 m) 38 1965 Boulevard East
West New York
[7]
7 The Versailles 346 ft (105 m) 29 1964 Boulevard East
West New York
[8]
8 Tower West TowerWesthighriseWNY 04.jpg 323 feet (98 m) 27 1962 Boulevard East
West New York
[9]
9 Overlook Terrace North 311 ft (95 m) 26 1969 Boulevard East
West New York
[10]
10 Overlook Terrace South 311 ft (95 m) 26 1969 Boulevard East
West New York
[11]
11 Bella Vista BellaVistahighriseUnionCity.tiff 289 ft (88 m) 24 1977 Bergenline
Union City
[12]
12 Parkview Towers North 287 ft (87 m) 24 1975 West New York [13]
13 Parkview Towers South 287 ft (87 m) 24 1975 West New York [14]
14 The Doric 277 ft (84 m) 23 1971 Palisades
Union City
[15]
15 Troy Towers TroyTowersUCWhkn.tiff 265 ft (81 m) 22 1965 Palisades
Union City
[16]

Notable towers

Eldorado Elevator

The dome of Monastery and Church of Saint Michael the Archangel, built between 1866 and 1875, rises 176 ft (54 m) .[17]

The Weehawken Water Tower, built in 1883, is 175 ft (53 m) tall.[18]

In 1890, the North Hudson County Railway built an elevator tower and viaduct to connect with trains at Weehawken Terminal with its street car lines on top of the Palisades. With the closure of the Gutenberg Racetrack, traffic diminished and the service discontinued. The 153 ft (47 m) tall towers supporting the 873 ft (266 m) long viaduct were dismantled in 1900.[19]

The Hudson County Brewing Company headquarters and plant built circa 1901 in what was West Hoboken was demolished in the early 1930s and became the site of Roosevelt Stadium.

The WOR TV Tower was a 760 ft (230 m) tall lattice tower used for FM- and TV-broadcasting at North Bergen built in 1949, which at that time made the tenth tallest man-made structure in the world.[20] On November 8, 1956, the top of the tower was hit by a small aircraft, which knocked off the top and killed six people. It was later dismantled.

Sources

  • Emporis North Bergen
  • Emporis Guttenberg
  • Emporis West New York
  • Emporis Weehawken
  • Emporis Union City

References

  1. ^ "Hudson High Point". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2014-06-29. 
  2. ^ "10-Year Building Boom on Palisades Seems Over for Luxury Apartments". The New York Times. October 17, 1977. 
  3. ^ Norman, Michael (July 4, 1982). "Palisades: New York's Other West Side". The New York Times. 
  4. ^ "Galaxy Towers". Emporis. Retrieved 2013-10-10. 
  5. ^ "Stonehenge". Emporis. Archived from the original on 2013-04-09. Retrieved 2013-10-10. 
  6. ^ "Parker Imperial". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  7. ^ "Riviera Tower". Emporis. Retrieved 2014-05-05. 
  8. ^ "The Versailles". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  9. ^ "Tower West". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  10. ^ "Overlook Terrace North". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  11. ^ "Overlook Terrace South". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  12. ^ "Bella Vista Apartments". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  13. ^ "Parkview Towers North". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  14. ^ "Parkview Towers North". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  15. ^ "Doric Apartments". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  16. ^ "Troy Towers". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  17. ^ "Saint Michaels Church". Emporis. Retrieved 2014-06-06. 
  18. ^ "Weehawken Water Tower". Emporis. Retrieved 2011-06-06. 
  19. ^ "End of the Big Viaduct Last Tower of the Structure at Weehawken being Removed". New York Tribune. March 5, 1900. p. 8. Preliminary surveys, borings for the foundations, plans and estimates of the cost of the structure were made in the fall of 1889 but the work of construction was not begun before the next year. The structure was designed to carry a double track railroad, to connect with the surface car lines on the summit of the Pallisades. The viaduct was 873 feet long and 153 feet above mean high water. It was built of steel. At the east end of it were three large Otis elevators, which carried passengers from the street to tne cars above. The elevators were the largest of their kind ever made. They were operated by water pressure on the combined gravity and pressure tank system from a compression tank placed in the top of the tower. Each car was 22 feet long by 12 feet 6 inches wide and was capable of lifting one hundred and fifty persons. 
  20. ^ WOR-TV and FM Transmitter in North Bergen, NJ, accessed November 20, 2006
Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_tallest_buildings_in_North_Hudson&oldid=783693771"
This content was retrieved from Wikipedia : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_buildings_in_North_Hudson
This page is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article "List of tallest buildings in North Hudson"; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA