List of tallest buildings in Baltimore

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Legg Mason Building 100 East Pratt Street Baltimore World Trade Center William Donald Schaefer Building Commerce Place 414 Water Street File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg File:Bmore skyline inner harbor.jpg
Skyline of Baltimore (Use cursor to identify buildings)

This list of tallest buildings in Baltimore ranks skyscrapers and high-rises in the U.S. city of Baltimore, Maryland by height. The tallest building in Baltimore is the 40-story Transamerica Tower (Baltimore), which rises 529 feet (161 m) and was completed in 1973.[1] It also stands as the tallest building in the state of Maryland and the tallest building on the East Coast between Philadelphia and Raleigh, after the RBC Plaza was built in 2008. The second-tallest building in the city and the state is the Bank of America Building, which is 509 feet (155 m) high.[2]

History

The history of skyscrapers in Baltimore began with the completion in 1889 of the Equitable Building at the southwest corner of North Calvert and East Fayette Streets across from the Beaux Arts/Classical Revival architecture of the Baltimore City Courthouse of 1894-1900 and the landmark Battle Monument in Battle Monument Square, commemorating the fallen in the defense of the City against the British attack in the 1814 Battle of Baltimore during the War of 1812. "The Equitable" as it became known replaced the earlier landmark from 1825, Barnum's City Hotel and was the first steel cage framed building with outside surface panels of stone hung on the frame, a new technique pioneered by Chicago architects like Louis Sullivan and Daniel Burnham. Shortly after, the 1893 construction of the Fidelity Building, of which both are regarded as the first high-rises in the City.[3] The building originally rose eight floors, but an additional seven stories with a terra cotta panels façade designed to match the original earlier grey granite rough-cut stone base, were constructed between 1912 and 1915, bringing the structure's total height to 220 feet (67 m), making it the first building in Baltimore over 200 feet (61 m).[3] Baltimore went through an early high-rise construction boom from the late 1890s to the Great Baltimore Fire of February 1904, when a half-dozen of new skyscrapers' so-called "fire-proof" but their interiors were burned out. Most were later judged by inspecting engineers/architects as structurally sound with their steel I-beam cage framing and masonry facades and were reconstructed and rehabilitated in the next five years in a flurry of downtown rebuilding. The next period from the 1910s to the late 1920s, during which time the iconic Baltimore Trust Company Tower (now the Bank of America Building) were constructed. The City's central business district then experienced a long fallow period due to the Great Depression of the 1930s and the defense industrial efforts of World War II where very few skyscrapers were constructed and the downtown remained relatively stable. But with the proposals by the major business, commercial and industrial interests of the area with the release of the Charles Center project proposal by the recently organized Greater Baltimore Committee and the local Chamber of Commerce with the leadership of several mayoral administrations in 1958 continuing into the early 1970s, followed by a parallel soon-to-be nationally famous "Inner Harbor" redevelopment around the old waterfront piers, wharves, warehouses, offices and businesses of the former "Basin" along the Baltimore Harbor at the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River continued another major building boom from the early 1960s to the early 1990s, during which the City saw the completion of 18 of its 24 tallest buildings, including the 1973 United States Fidelity and Guarantee Company's new iconic headquarters (later the Legg Mason Building, now the Transamerica Tower) at the corner of the harbor at Pratt and Light Streets and the five-sides/pentagonal high-rise centerpiece of the harbor, the Baltimore World Trade Center for the Maryland Port Administration in 1977. The City is the site of two completed buildings that are at least 500 feet (152 m) high, with one more under construction and two proposed for construction. As of June 2008, there are 163 completed high-rises in the city.[4] The most recently completed skyscraper in Baltimore is 414 Water Street, which rises 344 feet (105 m) and 33 floors.[5]

Skyline of Baltimore's downtown central business district and Inner Harbor (formerly "The Basin") of the Northwest Branch of the Patapsco River and Baltimore Port & Harbor

Tallest buildings

The 1973 United States Fidelity and Guarantee Company, later the Legg-Mason Building, now the Transamerica Tower is the tallest structure in both Baltimore and Maryland.
The copper-skinned William Donald Schaefer Building, the third-tallest building in the city with its corner spire, containing Maryland state offices, (originally built as the Merritt Tower of Merritt Savings and Loan Bank) at the northwest corner of East Baltimore and Light-St. Paul Streets
The 1977 Baltimore World Trade Center on Pier 2, East Pratt Street, the seventh-tallest building in Baltimore, and tallest regular pentagonal structure in the world
Bank of America Building
Commerce Place Baltimore
100 East Pratt Street
250 W. Pratt Street
414 Water Street (background)
HarborViewCondominium
Silo Point Condominium

This list ranks Baltimore skyscrapers that stand at least 300 feet (91 m) tall, based on standard height measurement. This includes spires and architectural details but does not include antenna masts. An equal sign (=) following a rank indicates the same height between two or more buildings. The "Year" column indicates the year in which a building was completed.

Rank Name Height
ft (m)
Floors Year Notes
1 Transamerica Tower 529 (161) 40 1973 Has been the tallest building in Baltimore and Maryland since 1973. Tallest building on the east coast between Philadelphia and Raleigh. Tallest building in the Baltimore-Washington Combined Statistical Area. Tallest building in the city constructed in the 1970s. In 2011 the building was renamed the Transamerica Tower.[1][6]
2 Bank of America Building 509 (155) 37 1924 Tallest building in Baltimore constructed in the 1920s.[2][7]
3 William Donald Schaefer Building 493 (150) 37 1992 Tallest building in the city constructed in the 1990s.[8][9]
4 Commerce Place 454 (138) 31 1992 [10][11]
5 100 East Pratt Street 418 (128) 28 1992 [12][13]
6 Baltimore World Trade Center 405 (123) 32 1977 Tallest regular pentagonal building in the world.[14][15]
7 Tremont Plaza Hotel 395 (120) 37 1967 Tallest building in Baltimore constructed in the 1960s.[16][17]
8 Charles Towers South Apartments 385 (117) 30 1969 Tallest residential building in Baltimore. Also known as Two Charles Center.[18][19]
9= Legg Mason Tower 360.5 (110) 24 2009 [20][21][22]
9= Four Seasons Hotel and Residences 360.5 (110) 30 2016
11= Blaustein Building 360 (110) 30 1962 [23][24]
11= 250 West Pratt Street 360 (110) 24 1986 Tallest building in the city constructed in the 1980s.[25][26]
11= 1st Mariner Bank Tower 360 (110) 17 2006 [27][28][29]
14 Towers at Harbor Court 356 (109) 28 1987 [30][31]
15= 201 North Charles Street Building 350 (107) 28 1967 [32][33]
15= Charles Towers North Apartments 350 (107) 27 1967 Also known as Eight Charles Center.[34][35]
15= Exelon Tower 350 (107) 20 2016 [36]
18 414 Water Street 344 (105) 33 2008 [5]
19 HarborView Condominium 342 (104) 29 1993 Also known as Harborview Tower.[37][38]
20= Charles Center South 330 (101) 25 1975 [39][40]
20= Wachovia Tower 330 (101) 24 1985 Formerly known as First Union Signet Tower. It is now known as the Wells Fargo Tower.[41][42]
21= Mercantile Bank & Trust Company 315 (96) 21 1969 [43][44]
21= M&T Bank Building 315 (96) 22 1972 Also known as the First Maryland Building.[45][46]
21= Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel 315 (96) 32 2001 Tallest hotel in Baltimore.[47]
24 Silo Point 310 (94) 24 1923 Under reconstruction.[48]
25 Vue Harbor East 306 (93) 30 2007 [49]
26 Baltimore Harbor Hotel 302 (92) 27 1967 [50][51]
27 Hilton Baltimore 224 (68) 20 2008 [52]

Tallest under construction or proposed

This lists buildings that are under construction or proposed for construction in Baltimore and are planned to rise at least 300 feet (91 m), but are not yet completed structures. A floor count of 40 stories is used as the cutoff for buildings whose heights have not yet been released by their developers.

Name Height
ft (m)
Floors Year*
(est.)
Status Notes
300 East Pratt Street 538 48 - Planned Landowner InterPark Holdings is in the process of selecting a new development partner[53]
414 Light Street ~545 44 2018 Under Construction Construction started on March 15, 2016[54]
325 W. Baltimore St. - 32 - Site cleared. Construction to commenced by Q1 2017 [55]
Mechanic Theatre Redevelopment - 20/32 - Demolition complete. Vertical construction stalled because of litigation with parking garage operator [56]
Canton Crossing 400 (122) - - Proposed [57]
1 Light Street 364 (111) 28 - Under Construction [58]
Liberty Harbor East 285 (87) 22 [59] 2018 Under Construction [60][61]

Timeline of tallest buildings

The Emerson Bromo-Seltzer Tower was the tallest building in Baltimore from 1911 until 1923.
1 Calvert Plaza

This lists buildings that once held the title of tallest building in Baltimore.

Name Street address Years as tallest Height
ft (m)
Floors Reference
Fidelity Building 05.0210 North Charles Street 1893–1901 220 (67) 15 [62]
One Calvert Plaza 04.0201 East Baltimore Street 1901–1911 249 (76) 16 [63]
Emerson Bromo-Seltzer Tower[A] 06.0312 West Lombard Street 1911–1923 289 (88) 15 [64]
Constellation Energy Building[A] 02.039 West Lexington Street 1916–1923 289 (88) 21 [65]
B&O Railroad Grain Terminal[B] 07.01700 Beason Street 1923–1924 310 (94) 24 [48]
Baltimore Trust Company Building[C] 01.010 Light Street 1924–1973 509 (155) 37 [7]
Transamerica Tower 03.0100 Light Street 1973–present 529 (161) 40 [6]

Notes

A. ^ a b The Constellation Energy Building, completed in 1916, tied the height of the Emerson Bromo-Seltzer Tower. The city therefore had two tallest buildings until the B&O Railroad Grain Terminal was completed in 1923.
B. ^ This building was constructed as the B&O Railroad Grain Terminal but has since been renamed Silo Point.
C. ^ This building was constructed as the Baltimore Trust Company Building but has since been renamed the Bank of America Building. In the past, the building has also known as the NationsBank Building, the Mathieson Building, the O'Sullivan Building and the Maryland National Bank.[66]

References

General
  • "High-rise Buildings of Baltimore". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
Specific
  1. ^ a b "Legg Mason Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  2. ^ a b "Bank of America Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-05-15. 
  3. ^ a b "Fidelity Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  4. ^ "High-rise Buildings of Baltimore". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-24. 
  5. ^ a b "414 Water Street". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  6. ^ a b "Legg Mason Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  7. ^ a b "Bank of America Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  8. ^ "William Donald Schaefer Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  9. ^ "Donald Schaefer Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  10. ^ "Commerce Place". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  11. ^ "Commerce Place". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  12. ^ "100 East Pratt Street". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  13. ^ "100 East Pratt Street". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  14. ^ "World Trade Center". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  15. ^ "World Trade Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  16. ^ "Tremont Plaza Hotel". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  17. ^ "Tremont Plaza Hotel". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  18. ^ "Charles Towers South Apartments". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  19. ^ "Two Charles Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  20. ^ "Legg Mason Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  21. ^ "Legg Mason Tower". Skyscraperpage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  22. ^ "Wesport Redevelopment Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  23. ^ "Blaustein Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  24. ^ "Blaustein Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  25. ^ "250 West Pratt Street". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  26. ^ "250 West Pratt Street". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  27. ^ http://www.spyderengineers.com/1st-mariner-bank-tower.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  28. ^ http://www.emporis.com/building/1st-mariner-bank-tower-baltimore-md-usa.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  29. ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/blog/real-estate/2014/07/first-mariner-tower-in-canton-could-soon-become.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  30. ^ "Towers at Harbor Court". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  31. ^ "Towers at Harbor Court". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  32. ^ "201 North Charles Street Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  33. ^ "201 North Charles Street Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  34. ^ "Charles Towers North Apartments". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  35. ^ "Eight Charles Center". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  36. ^ "Beatty to deliver Exelon first of its Harbor Point offices in March, apartment leasing also to begin - Baltimore Business Journal". Baltimore Business Journal. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  37. ^ "HarborView Condominium". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  38. ^ "Harborview Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  39. ^ "Charles Center South". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  40. ^ "Charles Center South". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  41. ^ "Wachovia Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  42. ^ "First Union Signet Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  43. ^ "Mercantile Bank and Trust Company". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  44. ^ "Mercantile Bank & Trust Company". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  45. ^ "M & T Bank Building". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  46. ^ "First Maryland Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  47. ^ "Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  48. ^ a b "Silo Point". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  49. ^ "Vue Harbor East". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  50. ^ "Wyndham Baltimore South Tower". Emporis.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  51. ^ "Wyndham Inner Harbor Hotel South". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  52. ^ "Hilton Baltimore". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  53. ^ "300 E. Pratt St. owner seeks new developer for tower". Retrieved 2016-10-07. 
  54. ^ "After years of anticipation, construction begins on 414 Light St. apartment tower - Baltimore Business Journal". Baltimore Business Journal. Retrieved 2016-03-17. 
  55. ^ "325 W. Baltimore St. developer drops office, increases apartments for 32-story tower". Retrieved 2016-10-07. 
  56. ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/blog/real-estate/2015/07/mechanic-theater-demolition-is-complete-but.html. Retrieved 2015-10-06.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  57. ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/print-edition/2015/08/21/proposed-office-sites-may-lure-companies-eastward.html.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  58. ^ "Offices, apartments in latest proposal for 1 Light Street". Retrieved 2015-10-06. 
  59. ^ http://www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/blog/real-estate/2016/09/22-story-apartment-whole-foods-tower-breaks-ground.html
  60. ^ "Whole Foods, residential tower in Harbor East is expected to break ground in spring - Baltimore Business Journal". Baltimore Business Journal. Retrieved 2016-09-14. 
  61. ^ Sun, Baltimore. "New Whole Foods project in Harbor East breaks ground, amid increasing industry costs". Retrieved 2016-09-14. 
  62. ^ "Fidelity Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  63. ^ "One Calvert Plaza". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  64. ^ "Emerson Tower". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  65. ^ "Constellation Energy/BG&E Building". SkyscraperPage.com. Retrieved 2008-06-20. 
  66. ^ "Baltimore-Arlington-Washington, Maryland-Virginia". The Skyscrapers Collection. Archived from the original on 2008-04-18. Retrieved 2008-06-28. 

External links

  • Diagram of Baltimore skyscrapers on SkyscraperPage
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