List of streetcar routes in Pittsburgh

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Pittsburgh Railways operated 68 streetcar routes. The table below lists their dates of operation.

List

No. Route opened closed / renamed notes
1 Spring Garden by 1915[1] Oct 6, 1957[2] PCC from 1940, closed (low traffic)[3]
2 Etna by 1907 Sep 2, 1952[2] Interchange between PRCo and Pittsburgh and Butler Street Railway from 1907 until 1931.
PCC from 1938, closed (state took land for PA Route 28)[3]
3 Millvale by 1915[1] Sep 2, 1952[2] PCC from 1938, closed (state took land for PA 28 as with the 2)[3]
4 Troy Hill by 1915[1] Jul 7, 1957[2] Loop was in Troy Hill at Lowrie and Roessler Streets. PCC from 1940, closed (street paving / low traffic)[3]
5 Troy Hill (Lowrie and Gardner) by 1916[4] closed; number reassigned
5 Troy Hill via North Avenue by 1918[5] closed; number reassigned
5 Spring Hill Oct 6, 1957[2] PCC from 1946, closed (street paving / low traffic)[3]
6 Brighton Road by 1915 Jan 26, 1966 In 1915 timetable.[1] PCC from 1938. Became 6/13.[6]
6/13 Brighton Road via Emsworth Sep 1965 Dec 31, 1965 Cut back to become 6/14 Brighton Avalon[7] when the Avalon bridge (Spruce Run Viaduct) and Ben Avon Bridge (Ravine Street Viaduct), built in 1905, were closed to trolleys due to weight restrictions.[8]
6/14 Brighton Avalon Dec 1965 Apr 30, 1966[9]
7 Charles Street by 1915[1] Sep 1, 1961[6]
8 Perrysville Avenue by 1899[10] Sep 4, 1965[6]
9 Charles Street Transfer by 1916[4] September 14, 1951[11] Double-end shuttle (no loop or wye) between the 7 Charles Street and 21 Fineview services.
10 West View and Bellevue by 1915[1] Sep 4, 1965[6] Formed a loop with 15 Bellevue. 10 West View was counterclockwise as far as West View.
11 East Street and Madison Avenue by 1915[1] Sep 4, 1965[6] Short turn of the 10
12 Evergreen Road via East Street by 1908 February 1954[12] Interchange between PRCo and Pittsburgh, Harmony, Butler and New Castle Railway from 1908 until 1931. Double-end shuttle (no loop or wye).
13 Emsworth by 1915[1] Sep 3, 1966[6] became 6/13
14 Avalon by 1915[1] Apr 30, 1966[6] Short turn of the 13. Became the 6/14 when 6/13 was cut back to Avalon loop.
15 Bellevue and West View by 1915[1] Sep 4, 1965[6] Formed a loop with 10 West View. 15 Bellevue was clockwise as far as West View.
16 Shadeland[13]
17 Reedsdale
18 Woods Run via Union Line by 1915[1] Sep 1, 1961[6]
19 Western Avenue by 1915[1] Sep 1, 1961[6]
20 Rebecca (later renamed Reedsdale) by 1915[1] October 14, 1951[2] PCC from 1942. Closed (loss of Manchester Bridge ramp)[3]
21 Nunnery Hill by 1915[1] Nunnery Hill was an old name for the Fineview neighborhood
21 Fineview 1908[7] Apr 30, 1966[9][6] Maximum grade of 12.24% was steepest grade on system. Inbound route duplicated 8 Perrysville Avenue. Initially closed without bus replacement due to grades and narrow streets on outbound route.[11] Later duplicated by PAT bus route 11
22 Crosstown by 1918[5] Jul 4, 1964[6] From North Side (formerly Allegheny City) business area to 6th/5th in downtown.
23 Coraopolis – Sewickley by 1916[4] Jun 22, 1952[2] Crossed the Ohio River 3 times, twice to reach and leave Neville Island, then over the entire channel between Coraopolis and Sewickley[11]
24 Schoenville 1919[14] 1952[14] Isolated from main network on January 26, 1920 with the closing of O'Donovan's Bridge due to structural deficiencies. Operated with a single car (4344) that was maintained on the street at one end of the line until closure.
25 McKees Rocks – Island Avenue by Dec 1, 1910[15] Jun 21, 1959[2]
26 McKees Rocks – West Park by 1915[1] Jun 21, 1959[2]
27 Carnegie and Heidelberg by Dec 1, 1910[15] Jun 21, 1959[2]
28 Crafton Junction by 1916[4] Jun 21, 1959[2]
29 Crafton and Thornburg by 1915[1] closed, date unknown
30 Crafton and Ingram by 1915[1] Jun 21, 1959[2]
31 Ingram–Sheraden 1897[16] 1950[13] The Pittsburgh, Crafton and Mansfield (Carnegie) Railway was chartered to build a streetcar line through Sheraden in 1897. The line (combined in 1950 with Route 34 to form the 31/34 Elliott-Ingram) closed when the Point Bridge closed as the replacement did not have tracks.
32 Elliott by 1915[1] June 6, 1953[12] Double-ended shuttle. Later known as 32 P&LE Transfer due to line's eastern terminus at P&LE Station. Track and wire remained intact until 1956 for nonrevenue use.
33 Mount Washington via Point by 1915[1] by 1952[13] Double-ended shuttle
34 Elliott by 1916[4] Jun 21, 1959[2] Became 31/34 Elliott-Ingram in 1950[3]
35 Elliott (Lorenz Avenue only) by 1916[4]
35 Castle ShannonLibrary Loop Via Overbrook. Truncation of Charleroi interurban line. Direct ancestor of current Blue Line - Library
36 Fair Haven by 1916[4]
36 Castle Shannon – Drake Loop Via Overbrook. Truncation of Washington interurban line. Direct ancestor of current Blue Line to South Hills Village. Drake Loop service ended 1999
37 Fair Haven and Castle Shannon by 1916[4] Best known by later designation 37 Castle Shannon. Ran via Overbrook; nucleus of modern Blue Line
38 Mount Lebanon and Castle Shannon 1915[17] May 25, 1963[6] Outer end beyond W. Liberty Ave. became part of 42/38 Mt. Lebanon-Beechview
38A Mount Lebanon Castle Shannon Shuttle A double end shuttle between Castle Shannon and Clearview loop. Replaced by a rush hour extension of 38 Mount Lebanon.[13]
39 Brookline 1905[17] Sep 3, 1966[6] South along West Liberty Avenue and then turned east along Brookline Blvd.[13] Originally extended as far as Saw Mill Run, cut back in 1906.[17]
40 Mount Washington via Tunnel by 1915[1] Sep 3, 1966[6]
41 Mount Washington Short Line by 1915[1]
42 Dormont by 1915[1] became 42/38 Mt. Lebanon-Beechview when 38 trackage on West Liberty Avenue abandoned.
42/38 Mt. Lebanon-Beechview Formed from 42 Dormont and southern end of 38 Mount Lebanon. Direct ancestor of Red Line
43 Neeld Avenue by 1916[4] Short turn of the 42 and 42/38
44 Knoxville via Tunnel by 1915[1] circa 1968 Signed as 44 Knoxville-Pa. Sta. for its northern terminus. Combined with route 48 in late 1960s
44/48 Knoxville-Arlington circa 1968 Nov 14, 1971[2]
45 by 1916[4]
46 Brownsville Road by 1915[1] Sep 30, 1946 Became 49 Beltzhoover
47 McKinley and Southern by 1916[4]
47 Carrick via Tunnel by 1915[1] Mar 30, 1968 Rush-hour variant of Route 53; became the new route for the 53 itself in 1968
48 Arlington by 1915[1] circa 1968 Combined with 44 Knoxville circa 1968. Portions became part of 49 Arlington-Warrington in 1971
49 Beltzhoover via Brownsville by 1915[1] Nov 13, 1971[2] portions became part of 49 Arlington-Warrington
49 Arlington-Warrington 1971 1984 renamed 52 Allentown
50 Carson via Smithfield by 1915[1] Feb 26, 1966[6]
51 Bon Air by 1916[4] by 1959[13]
52 Carson via Tenth Street Bridge by 1915[1] by 1959[13]
52 Allentown 1984 March 27, 2011 Part of PAT Brown Line. Trackage remains active with no scheduled service.
53 Carrick via South 18th Street 1901[18] Nov 13, 1971 Terminus in Brentwood. Rerouted via tunnel March 31, 1968.[2] Last car 1627
55 East Pittsburgh via Homestead and Braddock by 1915[1] Jul 4, 1964[6] Replaced by bus when Glenwood Bridge rebuilt without trolley tracks.
55A Munhall via Homestead Jul 4, 1964[6]
56 McKeesport via Dravosburg 1895 Aug 31, 1963[6] The McKeesport to Dravosburg line was electrified by the McKeesport and Reynoldton Passenger Railway Company in 1892. The line from Pittsburgh was extended from Hays to Dravosburg in 1895 and a trestle linking the two lines was completed in 1897.[19]
56A Lincoln Place via 2nd Ave. Aug 31, 1963[6]
57 Glenwood Mar 1890[13] Jul 4, 1964[6] First permanent electric line in Pittsburgh, Second Avenue Traction Co. Short turn of the 56.
58 Greenfield by 1915[1] Jul 4, 1964[6]
59 Homeville – Homestead Mar 8, 1953[20] Double-ended shuttle[11]
60 East Liberty-Homestead Sep 20, 1958[12] Some cars extended to serve Kennywood Park, signed East Liberty-Kennywood
62 Trafford by Dec 1, 1910[15] May 2, 1962[6]
63 Trafford City Express by 1916[4]
63 Corey Avenue, Braddock by 1916[4] by 1953[13] Double-ended shuttle[11]
64 East Pittsburgh via Wilkinsburg by 1915[1] Jan 27, 1967[6]
65 Hawkins and North Braddock by 1915[1]
65 Munhall-Lincoln Place Sep 4, 1965[6]
66 East and West Wilkinsburg via Forbes by 1915[1] Jan 27, 1967[6]
67 Swissvale, Rankin and Braddock by 1915[1] Jan 28, 1967 Replaced by bus service 61B Braddock – Swissvale[6][21] Braddock terminus was at Talbot Street (now Avenue) and 13th Street, listed as "Talbot Street loop". This now lies within the boundary of US Steel plant which extended west to 11th street in the 1970s.
68 McKeesport via Homestead and Duquesne by 1915[1] Sep 20, 1958[12] Served Kennywood Park. Longest line on the system (13.8 miles)
69 Larimer via Ellsworth by 1915[1]
69 Squirrel Hill Sep 20, 1958[12] Short turn of the 68
70 North Highland by 1915[1]
71 Centre and Negley by 1915[1] Jan 27, 1967[6] Later called Negley-Highland Park
72 Bloomfield via Forbes by 1915[1]
73 North Highland via Forbes by 1916[4]
73 Highland Jan 27, 1967[6]
75 Wilkinsburg via East Liberty Jan 27, 1967[6]
76 Wilkinsburg via Hamilton Avenue by 1915[1] Jan 27, 1967[6] Signed simply as Hamilton. From Fifth and Market, along Fifth to Hamilton, to Brushton, to Tioga, to Wilkinsburg.
77 Wilkinsburg via Fifth Avenue by 1915[1]
77/54 North Side to Carrick via Bloomfield Sep 4, 1965[6] Fondly known as the "Flying Fraction". Cut back to loop on Seneca and Gist Streets July 8, 1963 due to repaving of Brady Street Bridge[2]
78 Wilkinsburg – Verona 1901[22] Mar 27, 1938 Originally the Wilkinsburg Verona Street Railway
78 South Highland Avenue via Fifth by 1915[1]
78 Laketon Rd. by 1953[13] Double end shuttle from Wilkinsburg to Highland Ave. This was a cutback of the line to Verona, Oakmont and Hulton
79 Forbes, Shady and Penn by 1915[1]
80 East Pittsburgh via Braddock and Homestead by 1916[4]
81 Atwood Street by 1915[1] September 8, 1951[2] Double-ended shuttle route with through downtown single-end cars in rush hours (outer end looped)[2]
82 East Liberty via Centre Avenue by 1915[1]
82 Lincoln Jan 27, 1967[6]
83 Centre and Herron by 1915[1] Short turn of the 82
84 Centre and Larimer (night car) by 1915[1]
85 Wylie and Bedford by 1915[1] Jan 26, 1966[6]
86 East Liberty Express by 1915[1]
87 Ardmore Jan 27, 1967[6] Second longest line on system (by 0.1 mile), at 13.7 miles. Line between Wilmerding and Wilkinsburg abandoned September 4, 1966[2]
88 Frankstown Avenue by 1915[1] Jan 27, 1967[6]
90 Penn Avenue and West Wilkinsburg by 1915[1]
92 Shady Loop via Penn by 1916[4]
94 Sharpsburg and Aspinwall by Dec 1, 1910[15]
94 Aspinwall 1938 Nov 12, 1960 Closed during replacement of 62nd St. Sharpsburg Bridge with Senator Robert D. Fleming Bridge, which did not have streetcar tracks.[6][23]
95 Butler Street Nov 12, 1960[6] Short turn of the 94; turned at 62nd & Butler
96 Penn and Negley via Butler by 1915[1]
96 E. Liberty-62nd St. Nov 12, 1960[6]
98 Larimer via Penn by 1916[4]
98 Glassport Sep 1, 1963 Closed following severe storm damage on August 3, 1963[24][25]
99 Evans Ave Glassport Double end shuttle from Glassport via Ohio Ave, 9th, Monongahela Ave, 5th Ave to Evans Ave.[13] Became 98 Glassport

A notable, unnumbered, tripper (unscheduled extra) service was signed Stadium-Forbes Field, for Pitt Panthers and Pittsburgh Steelers football games and Pirates baseball games. Pitt Stadium and Forbes Field were convenient to the lines on Fifth Avenue and Forbes Avenue, both two-way streets during the trolley era. This service, which probably last ran in fall 1966, was no longer possible after the East End lines closed in January 1967.

Interurban lines

The Interurban lines did not use route numbers. Outbound interurban cars were signed for their outbound destination, namely Charleroi, Roscoe or Washington; some PCC rollsigns instead prefixed Shannon- to the destination, e.g. Shannon-Washington. Inbound cars were signed simply Pittsburgh.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba Lewis' Pittsburgh Street & Trolly (sic) Guide. Lewis Publishing Co. 1915. pp. 185–200. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Schneider, Fred W. III (1983). PCC From Coast to Coast. Glendale, CA: Interurban Press. pp. 168–169. ISBN 0-916374-57-2. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "Pittsburghtransit.info – The Routes – PCC Operation". August 28, 2005. Retrieved August 9, 2009. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Comparison Between Pittsburgh Railways Schedules of February, 1910, and August, 1916
  5. ^ a b "The Gazette Times". June 20, 1918. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am "Pittsburgh Railways Online – A Trolley Car Tragedy". February 18, 2002. Retrieved August 14, 2009. 
  7. ^ a b "Steel City Traction 3 North Side Story Narration Script". Retrieved October 30, 2009. 
  8. ^ "6/13 Brighton Emsworth Important Service Changes". December 31, 1965. Retrieved December 9, 2010. 
  9. ^ a b "Pittsburgh Railway Company 1872–1974". April 30, 1966. Retrieved September 2, 2009. 
  10. ^ "Advertisement; BENTON Allegheny's new suburb". Pittsburgh, Pa: Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette. April 28, 1899. Retrieved December 21, 2009. 
  11. ^ a b c d e Smith, Harold A. (1992). Touring Pittsburgh by Trolley: A Pictorial Review of the Early Sixties. New York: Quadrant Press, Inc. ISBN 0-915276-48-8. 
  12. ^ a b c d e "Pittsburgh Railways Online – A Trolley Car Tragedy – 1950's". February 18, 2002. Retrieved November 16, 2009. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Maps of PA". Pittsburgh Electric Railway Club. 1959. Retrieved September 2, 2009. 
  14. ^ a b "Steel City Traction 2 West End Story Narration Script". Retrieved October 29, 2009. 
  15. ^ a b c d Arnold, Bion Joseph (December 1, 1910). Report on the Pittsburgh transportation problem, submitted to the Honorable William A. Magee, mayor of the city of Pittsburgh. By Bion J. Arnold, consulting engineer. Pittsburgh, Pa: Republic bank note company. Retrieved November 16, 2009. 
  16. ^ "pghbridges – Corliss Street Tunnel". August 30, 2001. Retrieved October 25, 2009. 
  17. ^ a b c "The Brookline Connection – Trolley Service in Brookline". October 6, 2009. Retrieved October 9, 2009. 
  18. ^ Nick Markowitz (February 15, 1977). "Trolleys in Carrick". Pittsburgh: The South Hills Record. Retrieved October 11, 2009. 
  19. ^ "All about "The Burg" – Dravosburg Centennial Committee". 2003. Retrieved November 1, 2009. 
  20. ^ "AMCAP – 59A Homeville". November 8, 2006. Retrieved October 10, 2009. 
  21. ^ "The Antique Motor Coach Association of Pennsylvania – 67 Braddock – Swissvale (bus)". Retrieved October 28, 2009. 
  22. ^ "BUSSES REPLACE WILKINSBURG TROLLEY LINE". Pittsburgh, Pa: The Pittsburgh Press. March 27, 1938. Retrieved April 21, 2010. 
  23. ^ "Sharpsburg Bridge c1900-1962". December 22, 2008. Retrieved August 14, 2009. 
  24. ^ "Glassport, Allegheny County, PA". December 29, 2006. Retrieved August 13, 2009. 
  25. ^ "Glassport, Pennsylvania 1976 Bicentennial Report "Glassport, Pennsylvania – It happened here."". 1976. Retrieved August 13, 2009. 
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