List of secondary state highways in Virginia

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Virginia 8.svg Circle sign 619.svg
Primary and secondary State Route shields
System information
Notes Outside cities, some towns, and two counties, every road is state-maintained. These roads are split into primary and secondary State Routes, and receive different levels of funding. Inside cities, most primary State Routes are locally maintained.
Highway names
Interstates Interstate X (I-X)
US Highways U.S. Route X (US X)
State State Route X (SR X) or Virginia Route X (VA X)
System links

This is a partial list of secondary state highways in the U.S. state of Virginia. The numbers begin with 600 and can go into five digits in populous counties such as Fairfax County. The same number can be, and often is, assigned to secondary roads in more than one county. Because of the sheer number of secondary routes, this list is not intended to be a complete list.

For information about the creation and history of Virginia's Secondary Roads System, see article Byrd Road Act.

Contents

SR 600

SR 601

SR 602

SR 603

SR 604

SR 605

SR 606

SR 607

SR 608

SR 609

SR 610

SR 611

SR 612

SR 613

SR 614

SR 615

SR 616

SR 617

SR 618

SR 619

SR 620

SR 621

SR 622

SR 623

SR 624

SR 625

SR 626

SR 627

SR 628

SR 628 (Suffolk)

State Route 628 in Suffolk was a secondary state highway. The 5.26-mile (8.47 km)[1] highway was transferred to the city on July 1, 2006, and is now simply known as Crittenden Road. Until 1947, the southwesternmost 3 miles (4.8 km) of it was primary SR 192.

SR 629

SR 630

SR 631

SR 632

SR 633

SR 634

SR 635

SR 636

SR 637

SR 638

SR 639

SR 640

SR 641

SR 642

SR 643

SR 643 (Tazewell County)

State Route 643 in Tazewell County is a 1.4 mile long road extending over Station Hill. Also known as Station Hill Road, it has 5 hairpin turns in its remarkably short length. The road extends from VA 624/Amonate Rd to VA 637/Dry Fork Rd.

SR 644

SR 645

SR 646

SR 647

SR 648

SR 649

SR 650

SR 651

SR 652

SR 653

SR 654

SR 655

SR 656

SR 657

SR 658

SR 659

SR 660

SR 661

SR 662

SR 663

SR 664

SR 665

SR 666

SR 667

SR 667 (Wythe County)

State Route 667 in Wythe County runs 7.1 miles (11.4 km)[2] along Old Stage Road, a former main road in the corridor of present U.S. Route 11 between northeast of Rural Retreat and Wytheville. The part of SR 667 east of SR 654 (Berea Road) at the Wytheville National Fish Hatchery was primary State Route 114 until 1938.

SR 668

SR 669

SR 670

SR 671

SR 672

SR 673

SR 674

SR 675

SR 676

SR 677

SR 678

SR 679

SR 680

SR 681

SR 682

SR 683

SR 684

SR 685

SR 686

SR 687

SR 688

SR 689

SR 690

SR 691

SR 692

SR 693

SR 694

SR 695

SR 696

SR 697

SR 698

SR 699

SR 700

SR 700 (Washington County)

State Route 700 in Washington County runs 31.06 miles (49.99 km)[3] in a general northeasterly direction from U.S. Route 58/U.S. Route 421 west of Bristol to State Route 645 near its junction with State Route 91 in Saltville. The southwesternmost 5.15 miles (8.29 km), ending just northeast of Benhams, was primary State Route 77 until 1942.

SR 703 (Northampton County)

State Route 703 in Northampton County is a secondary state highway. Also known as Butler's Bluff Drive, it begins at Kiptopeke Drive and loops around to Arlington Road.

SR 704 (Northampton County)

State Route 704 in Northampton County is a secondary state highway. Also known as Kiptopeke Drive, it begins at the Lankford Highway in Kiptopeke and continues into Kiptopeke State Park.

SR 711 (Chesterfield and Powhatan Counties)

State Route 711 in Chesterfield and Powhatan Counties is a secondary state highway which runs from State Route 147 west to U.S. Route 522. It was primary State Route 44 until 1952.

SR 712 (Brunswick County)

State Route 712 in Brunswick County is an old alignment of the present US 1 corridor, bypassed in 1925. It runs 12.62 miles (20.31 km)[4] from State Route 606, just south of U.S. Route 58 at Edgerton, north to US 1 at the Nottoway River. Until 1949, it was primary State Route 140.

SR 734 (Loudoun County)

SR 738 (Caroline, Hanover, and Spotsylvania Counties)

State Route 738 in Caroline, Hanover and Spotsylvania Counties, Virginia is a 38.38-mile (61.77 km)[5][6][7] secondary state highway between Richmond and Fredericksburg. It begins at State Route 646 northwest of Hanover, heading north and west to cross U.S. Route 1 at Gum Tree. From there it heads gradually west and north, mostly along an old alignment of State Route 1 (now US 1), through Coatesville, Chilesburg, and Partlow. SR 738 ends at an intersection with State Route 208 and State Route 606 at Snell; SR 208 continues northeasterly via Spotsylvania to US 1 south of Fredericksburg.

SR 738 (Fairfax County)

State Route 738 in Fairfax County is a two-lane secondary state highway beginning in McLean, VA at the intersection of SR-123/SR-309, heads northwest, intersecting with SR-193, and ends at the entry gate of Great Falls Park.

SR 744 (Lee County)

State Route 744 in Lee County extends for 3.7 miles (6.0 km)[8] from U.S. Route 58 Business east of Ewing south to the Tennessee state line. Its continuation in Tennessee is an unnumbered county road in the direction of Alanthus Hill and State Route 63. SR 744 was primary SR 62 until 1942.

SR 758 (Lee County)

State Route 758 in Lee County extends for 7.3 miles (11.7 km)[8] from U.S. Route 58 west of Jonesville south to the Tennessee state line. Its continuation in Tennessee is an unnumbered county road in the direction of State Route 63 at Mulberry Gap. SR 758 was primary SR 63 until 1946.

SR 762 (Smyth and Washington Counties)

State Route 762 in Smyth and Washington Counties runs 11.85 miles (19.07 km)[3][9] from State Route 91 at Lodi east to State Route 600 and State Route 660 at St. Clair Bottom and then north to Interstate 81 and State Route 107 in Chilhowie. Except for a realignment at St. Clair Bottom, SR 762 was primary State Route 79 until 1953. (The part west of St. Clair Bottom had been a primary state highway since 1924.)

SR 772 (Loudoun County)

State Route 772 in Loudoun County, Virginia is a secondary state highway. Otherwise known as Ryan Road, it is an east–west running road linking Route 621 (Evergreen Mills Road) and Route 617 with the Dulles Greenway and Ashburn via an Intersection with Route 659 in Brambleton. The intersection with the Dulles Greenway is the planned location for the western terminus of the proposed Silver Line of the Washington Metro.[10] Note that a section of SR 772 is now part of the Loudoun County Parkway.

SR 803 (Accomack County)

State Route 803 in Accomack County, also known as Causeway Road and Wallops Island Road, is a road that connects SR 679 (Atlantic Road) in Assawoman to the Wallops Island Flight Facility on Wallops Island.

SR 805 (Grayson County)

State Route 805 in Grayson County runs for 10.1 miles (16.3 km)[11] from US 21 south of Dry Run Gap to SR 94 at Providence. SR 805 was primary State Route 95 until 1953.

SR 5000 (James City County)

State Route 5000 in James City County is a secondary state highway. Known as Monticello Avenue, it runs for 3.7 miles (6.0 km) from VA 5 southwest of Williamsburg, Virginia to the junction of State Route 321, State Route 615, and State Route 613.[12]

See also

References

  1. ^ "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Nansemond Maintenance Area" (PDF). (501 KiB)
  2. ^ "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Wythe County" (PDF). (97.8 KiB)
  3. ^ a b "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Washington County" (PDF). (356 KiB)
  4. ^ "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Brunswick County" (PDF). (173 KiB)
  5. ^ "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Hanover County" (PDF). (679 KiB)
  6. ^ "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Caroline County" (PDF). (178 KiB)
  7. ^ "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Spotsylvania County" (PDF). (588 KiB)
  8. ^ a b "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Lee County" (PDF). (230 KiB)
  9. ^ "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Smyth County" (PDF). (201 KiB)
  10. ^ http://www.dullesmetro.com/stations/ryan.cfm
  11. ^ "2005 Virginia Department of Transportation Jurisdiction Report – Daily Traffic Volume Estimates: Grayson County" (PDF). (229 KiB)
  12. ^ "Google Maps". Google Maps. Retrieved 10 April 2018.
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