List of scheduled monuments in South Somerset

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South Somerset shown within Somerset and England

South Somerset is a local government district in Somerset, England. The South Somerset district covers an area of 370 square miles (958 km2)[1] ranging from the borders with Devon and Dorset to the edge of the Somerset Levels. It has a population of approximately 162,000.[2] The administrative centre of the district is Yeovil.

A scheduled monument is a nationally important archaeological site or monument which is given legal protection by being placed on a list (or "schedule") by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport; Historic England takes the leading role in identifying such sites. The legislation governing this is the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979. The term "monument" can apply to the whole range of archaeological sites, and they are not always visible above ground. Such sites have to have been deliberately constructed by human activity. They range from prehistoric standing stones and burial sites, through Roman remains and medieval structures such as castles and monasteries, to later structures such as industrial sites and buildings constructed for the World Wars or the Cold War.[3]

There are 69 scheduled monuments in South Somerset.[4][5] Some of the oldest are Neolithic, Bronze Age or Iron Age including hillforts, such as Kenwalch's Castle and Bowl barrows. The Romano-British period is represented with several sites including the Low Ham Roman Villa which included an extensive mosaic floor, now on display in the Museum of Somerset.[6] Religious sites are represented by Muchelney Abbey, which was probably founded in the 8th century,[7] and Montacute Priory, a Cluniac priory of the Benedictine order, from the 11th.[8] Bruton Abbey was founded by the Benedictines before becoming a house of Augustinian canons. Stoke sub Hamdon Priory was formed in 1304 as a chantry college rather than a priory.[9] More recent sites include several motte-and-bailey castles such as Cary Castle,[10] and church crosses which date from the Middle Ages. Several packhorse bridges, such as Bow Bridge, Plox also appear in the list. The most recent monuments include the Round House, a village lock-up in Castle Cary dating from 1779, and several duck decoys[11][12][13] The monuments are listed below using the titles given in the English Heritage data sheets.

Monuments

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The date given is the date used by Historic England as significant for the initial building or that of an important part in the structure's description.
  2. ^ Sometimes known as OSGB36, the grid reference is based on the British national grid reference system used by the Ordnance Survey.
  3. ^ The "List Entry Number" is a unique number assigned to each listed building and scheduled monument by Historic England.

References

  1. ^ "An introduction to South Somerset" (PDF). South Somerset District Council. Retrieved 6 June 2012. 
  2. ^ "About Our District". South Somerset Council. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  3. ^ "Scheduled Monuments". Historic England. Retrieved 3 November 2015. 
  4. ^ "Scheduled Monuments". South Somerset Council. Retrieved 9 September 2014. 
  5. ^ "National Archeological Sites" (PDF). South Somerset Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  6. ^ "Museum of Somerset opens!". Victoria County History. Retrieved 9 September 2014. 
  7. ^ "Muchelney Abbey". Pastscape. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 September 2014. 
  8. ^ a b "Montacute Priory". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 12 July 2009. 
  9. ^ a b Pantin, W. A. (1959). "Chantry Priests' Houses and other Medieval Lodgings" (PDF). Medieval Archaeology. Society for Medieval Archaeology. 3: 219–224. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  10. ^ "Monument No. 200127". Pastscape National Monuments Record. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 
  11. ^ a b Byford, Enid (1987). Somerset Curiosities. Dovecote Press. p. 16. ISBN 0946159483. 
  12. ^ Warren, Derrick (2005). Curious Somerset. Sutton Publishing. p. 32. ISBN 978-0-7509-4057-3. 
  13. ^ a b "The Round House". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 March 2014. 
  14. ^ "Monument No. 200127". Patsscape National Monuments Record. English Heritage. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 
  15. ^ Richardson, Miranda. "An archaeological assessment of Castle Cary" (PDF). English Heritage Extensive Urban Survey. Somerset County Council. p. 4. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 November 2014. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 
  16. ^ Adkins, Lesley and Roy (1992). A field Guide to Somerset Archeology. Stanbridge: Dovecote press. p. 35. ISBN 0-946159-94-7. 
  17. ^ "Castle, Castle Cary". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 
  18. ^ a b "Bruton Abbey". Pastscape. English Heritage. Retrieved 30 December 2013. 
  19. ^ Balland's Castle, Penselwood, Somerset County Historic Environmental Record, accessed 18 July 2011.
  20. ^ a b Creighton, Oliver Hamilton. (2005) Castles and Landscapes: Power, Community and Fortification in Medieval England. London: Equinox. ISBN 978-1-904768-67-8.
  21. ^ "Almonry Barn, Almonry Farm, Muchelney". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  22. ^ R. W. Dunning (editor), A. P. Baggs, R. J. E. Bush, Margaret Tomlinson (1974). "Parishes: Long Sutton". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 3. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  23. ^ "Bineham deserted medieval village, Long Sutton". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  24. ^ "Round barrow, 110 m south west of Spittle Pond Cottages, Higher Wambrook". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  25. ^ "Wimble Toot, Babcary". Gatehouse. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  26. ^ "Wimble Toot". Pastscape. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  27. ^ "Bowl barrow on Charn Hill". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  28. ^ "Roman villa, West Coker". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  29. ^ "Monument No. 196297". Pastscape. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  30. ^ "Combe Beacon barrow". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 November 2014. 
  31. ^ "Dundon Hill". Pastscape. English Heritage. Archived from the original on 25 March 2012. Retrieved 2 February 2011. 
  32. ^ "Dundon Hillfort, Compton Dundon". Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 27 December 2010. 
  33. ^ "Churchyard cross, about 5 m south of nave, Church of t Aldhelm and St Eadburha". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  34. ^ "Churchyard Cross in churchyard of Church of St. Catherine". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  35. ^ "Cross in the churchyard of St John the Baptist 15 m south east of the church door". National heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  36. ^ "Deserted medieval settlement and associated fields, Lytes Cary". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  37. ^ "Deserted medieval settlement and associated fields, Lytes Cary, Charlton Mackrell". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 4 May 2013. 
  38. ^ a b Bush, Robin (1994). Somerset: The complete guide. Wimborne: The Dovecote Press Ltd. p. 137. ISBN 1-874336-26-1. 
  39. ^ Aston, Mick. "Medieval rural settlement" (PDF). Somerset County Council. Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  40. ^ "Duck decoy on Middle Moor". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  41. ^ "Duck decoy 700 m WNW of Rookery Farm". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  42. ^ a b Richardson, Miranda. "Milborne Port" (PDF). Somerset Urban Archaeological Survey. Somerset County Council. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2014. 
  43. ^ "Early Medieval and Medieval urban remains, Milborne Port". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  44. ^ "Ham Hill Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) citation sheet" (PDF). English Nature. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 October 2006. Retrieved 6 February 2011. 
  45. ^ "Ham Hill Iron Age Hillfort Publisher=wessex archeology". Retrieved 6 February 2011. 
  46. ^ "Hamdon Hill Camp". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 26 December 2010. 
  47. ^ "Haselbury Old Bridge". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  48. ^ "Haselbury Bridge". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  49. ^ "Horse Pool Camp". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 26 August 2011. 
  50. ^ "Whitestaunton Camp". National Monuments Record. English Heritage. Retrieved 5 October 2012. 
  51. ^ "Hillfort, Bounds Lane, Wambrook". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  52. ^ "Cotley Castle Hillfort, Wambrook, Chard, Somerset". Digital Digging. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  53. ^ a b Putnum, Bill. The Romans. Discover Dorset. The Dovecote Press. p. 39. ISBN 978-1874336747. 
  54. ^ Havinden, Michael. The Somerset Landscape. The making of the English landscape. London: Hodder and Stoughton. p. 67. ISBN 0-340-20116-9. 
  55. ^ White, Roger (2007). Britannia Prima. Stroud: Tempus. pp. 114, 133. 
  56. ^ "Kenwalch's Castle". National Monuments Record. English Heritage. Archived from the original on 2 October 2012. Retrieved 24 March 2011. 
  57. ^ "Kenwalch's Castle Hillfort.". Digital Digging. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  58. ^ Richardson, Miranda. "English Heritage Extensive Urban Survey An archaeological assessment of Ilchester" (PDF). Somerset County Council. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  59. ^ "Late Iron-Age enclosure (the 'oppidum'), S of Ilchester". Somerset Heritage. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  60. ^ "Low Ham Roman villa". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 19 October 2013. 
  61. ^ "Low Ham Roman villa, High Ham — South Somerset". Heritage at Risk. English Heritage. Retrieved 28 October 2015. 
  62. ^ Somerset County Council. "The Low Ham Roman Mosaic". Somerset County Council Museum Collections. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  63. ^ "Lower Woolston medieval settlement". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 16 November 2014. 
  64. ^ "Maperton medieval settlement". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  65. ^ "Marston Magna moated site and associated earthworks". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  66. ^ "Medieval bridge 100 m south west of Wyke House". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  67. ^ "Secular College, Parsonage Farm, Stoke sub Hamdon". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 16 December 2013. 
  68. ^ "Parsonage Farmhouse The Priory". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 15 December 2013. 
  69. ^ "Medieval settlement 190 m south west of Perry's Bridge". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  70. ^ "Medieval settlement 300 m east of Knight House Farm". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  71. ^ "Medieval settlement remains 100 m and 250 m north of Downhead Manor Farm". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  72. ^ "Roman villa, Melbury, Somerton". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  73. ^ "Monument No. 193540". Pastscape. English Heritage. 
  74. ^ "Moated site 800 m NNW of Pipplepen Farmhouse". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  75. ^ "Moated site, two fishponds and associated earthworks at Knight House Farm". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  76. ^ Parishes: Montacute, A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 3 (1974), pp. 210–224, accessed 13 July 2011; Richardson, p.3.
  77. ^ Montacute Castle, Pastscape National Monuments Record, English Heritage, accessed 14 July 2011.
  78. ^ Adkins L. and R. A. Adkins. (1989) "Excavation on St. Michael's Hill", Proceedings of the Somerset Archaeological and Natural History Society 133, pp.125–129.
  79. ^ Motte and Bailey Castle, Cockroad Wood, Charlton Musgrove, Somerset County Historic Environmental Record, accessed 18 July 2011.
  80. ^ Cockroad Wood Motte, Charlton Musgrove, Gatehouse website, accessed 18 July 2011.
  81. ^ "Muchelney Abbey". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  82. ^ "Muchelney Abbey". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 23 June 2014. 
  83. ^ Richardson, Miranda. "An archaeological assessment of Ilchester" (PDF). English Heritage Extensive Urban Survey. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  84. ^ Webster, Chris; Mayberry, Tom (2007). "The Roman Period". The archaeology of Somerset. Wellington: Somerset Books. p. 56. ISBN 978-0-86183-437-2. 
  85. ^ "Northover House, late Roman cemetery, Ilchester – South Somerset". Heritage at Risk. English Heritage. Retrieved 28 October 2015. 
  86. ^ "Pen Pits". Pastscape. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  87. ^ "Pill Bridge, Long Sutton". British Listed Buildings. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  88. ^ "Pill Bridge". Pastscape. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  89. ^ "Donyatt Pottery Kilns". Pastscape. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  90. ^ "Pottery kilns (Donyatt Site 2), south of Whitney Bottom, Donyatt". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  91. ^ "Promontory fort on Barrow Hill". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  92. ^ "Dovecote, about 370 metres South of Bruton Church (also known as Pigeon Tower), Park Wall (North side), Bruton". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 30 December 2013. 
  93. ^ "Dovecote about 370 metres South of Bruton Church". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 30 December 2013. 
  94. ^ "Supposed Roman Villa, Fair View House, Hambridge". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  95. ^ "Roman villa, Drayton". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  96. ^ "Roman settlement, Camel Hill, West Camel". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  97. ^ "Roman villa, N of Lufton". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  98. ^ "Roman villa and associated finds, north of Dunnock's Lane, East Coker". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  99. ^ "Roman villa, Roman Farm, Pitney". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  100. ^ "TimeTeam at Whitestaunton Manor". Chard Museum. Archived from the original on 4 July 2013. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  101. ^ "Whitestaunton Manor". Wessex Archaeology. Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  102. ^ "Butter Cross". Somerton Web Museum. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  103. ^ "Somerton Market Cross". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  104. ^ Warren, Derrick (2005). Curious Somerset. Stroud: Sutton Publishing. p. 32. ISBN 978-0-7509-4057-3. 
  105. ^ "House of Cluniac monks: The priory of Montacute". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 2. British History Online. Retrieved 12 July 2009. 
  106. ^ "Tintinhull Court,". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 8 June 2009. 
  107. ^ "Extant of Montacute Priory in 1301". Tintinhull local history. Retrieved 12 July 2009. 
  108. ^ "The Hanging Chapel". Images of England. Retrieved 6 November 2006. 
  109. ^ "The Hanging Chapel and a medieval gateway at The Hill No:33713". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 7 July 2009. 
  110. ^ "Bow Bridge". Images of England. English Heritage. Retrieved 3 July 2009. 
  111. ^ "Bow Bridge (also known as The Packhorse Bridge), Plox (North West side), Bruton". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 3 July 2009. 
  112. ^ "Bruton". A History of the County of Somerset: Volume 7: Bruton, Horethorne and Norton Ferris Hundreds (1999), pp. 18–42. British History Online. Retrieved 20 November 2010. 
  113. ^ "Bow Bridge, Bruton". Transport Heritage. Retrieved 20 November 2010. 
  114. ^ "Northay Barrow, Beetham Lane, Northay". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  115. ^ "Two bowl barrows 300 m north west of Northay Farm". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  116. ^ "Village cross". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  117. ^ "Village cross". National Heritage List for England. English Heritage. Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  118. ^ "Roman villa, Wadeford". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  119. ^ "Monument No. 191803". Pastscape. English Heritage. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
  120. ^ "West Mudford medieval settlement, 500 m SW of West Mudford Farm, Mudford". Somerset Historic Environment Record. Somerset County Council. Retrieved 21 September 2014. 
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